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London Bridge, London | Tourist Information


21-27 St.Thomas St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 3

02074036996

Many historical bridges named London Bridge have spanned the River Thames between the City of London and Southwark, in central London. The current crossing, which opened to traffic in 1974, is a box girder bridge built from concrete and steel. This replaced a 19th-century stone-arched bridge, which in turn superseded a 600-year-old medieval structure. This was preceded by a succession of timber bridges, the first built by the Roman founders of London.The current bridge stands at the western end of the Pool of London but is positioned upstream from previous alignments. The traditional ends of the medieval bridge were marked by St Magnus-the-Martyr on the northern bank and Southwark Cathedral on the southern shore. Until Putney Bridge opened in 1729, London Bridge was the only road-crossing of the Thames downstream of Kingston-upon-Thames. Its importance has been the subject of popular culture throughout the ages such as in the nursery rhyme "London Bridge Is Falling Down" and its inclusion within art and literature.The modern bridge is owned and maintained by Bridge House Estates, an independent charity overseen by the City of London Corporation. It carries the A3 road, which is maintained by the Greater London Authority. The crossing also delineates an area along the southern bank of the River Thames, between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, that has been designated as a business improvement district.

Arts and Entertainment Near London Bridge

London Dungeon
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28-34 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction in London, England, which recreates various gory and macabre historical events in a gallows humour style. It uses a mixture of live actors, special effects and rides.OverviewOpening in 1974, the attraction was initially designed as a museum of macabre history, but the Dungeon has evolved to become an actor-led, interactive experience. The Dungeon is operated by Merlin Entertainments. In 2013, the London Dungeon moved from its premises on Tooley Street to a new location in County Hall next to the London Eye.FormatThe London Dungeon features 18 shows, 20 actors and 3 rides. Visitors are taken on a journey through 1000 years of London’s history where they meet actors performing as some of London’s most infamous characters, including Jack the Ripper and Sweeney Todd. The Dungeon’s shows are staged on theatrical sets with special effects. The show incorporates events such as the Black Death and the Gunpowder Plot, and includes characters such as "The Torturer", "The Plague Doctor", and "The Judge". Guests are encouraged to participate in the shows. The experience also includes a "drop ride to doom", a free-fall ride staged as a public hanging.

Proud Cabaret
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
No. 1 Mark Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AH

City 0207 283 1940 / Camden 0207 482 3867

Modeled on a 1920s speakeasy, Proud Cabaret City is an elegant destination which offers fine dining and entertainment in surroundings which exude the illicit glamour of a bygone era. Designed by Danielle Proud, the venue has a sophisticated, decadent feel. Thursday through Saturday, from 6.30pm the kitchen serves superbly executed British cuisine, with space for 275 covers. There is also an informal bar menu serving lighter dishes. The extensive wine list is the perfect accompaniment, whilst the bartenders concoct both classic and contemporary cocktails. Proud Cabaret Camden is located in the South Gallery of the 200-year-old Grade II Listed Horse Hospital in the Stables Market. After being a stronghold for live bands and the alternative scene for many years, Camden now welcomes a more glamorous crowd. Formerly Proud Kitchen, the south gallery has undergone an extensive transformation to offer not only food but a glamorous, more decadent, 360 entertainment experience that is the perfect partner to the Proud Camden gallery and live music venue. Adding to the eclectic, buzzing atmosphere of Camden, Proud Cabaret Camden is the first offering of its kind in North London. An elegant, decadent space, it oozes the glamour and sophistication of a bygone era. Thursday through to Saturday Proud Cabaret Camden venues combine the country's highest class of performers with superbly executed dishes, wine lists and cocktail menus.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

555-555-5555

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. In 1614 the Globe Theatre was rebuilt. In 1642, under the force of the Puritans, the English Parliament issued an ordinance suppressing all stage plays in the theatres and in 1644 the Globe Theatre was demolished by the Puritans. A reproduction of the theatre was built in1997 and still stands today.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

London Bridge City
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom SE1 2DB

020 7403 4866

From London Bridge to Tower Bridge: a bustling, central riverside destination. London Bridge City includes More London, No.1 London Bridge, Cottons Centre and Hay's Galleria. Come and experience a changing programme of arts, entertainment and events, world-class food and drink against a backdrop of great architecture and historic markets.

The Miller Pub
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
96 Snowfield Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 3

02075606640

La Pollera Colora Latin Nightclub
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
6 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

07702630257

La Pollera Colora Latinclub situated in the heart of the City of London, right next to the newly developed Shard Building in London Bridge, is widely recognised amongst UK's Latin Music & Dance enthusiasts as the best place around to experience true Latin Atmosphere, Music & Drinks. The Nightclub with a Capacity of well over 500 People recently was voted "UK's Latin Nightclub of the Year" in the Latin American UK Awards (LUKAS) & has also acquired other Prestigious Awards since opening. The Nightclub itself has 2 Separate Dance Rooms on different levels featuring Pure Wooden Dance Floors to give the place a pure Latin Flavour, Great Air-Conditioning and very attentive Service. Bottle Table Service, is always available. A wide Variety of Thirst Quenching Latin Cocktails prepared by experienced Bar Tenders are also very enticing. Wether its a Cuban Mojito that tickles you fancy, to a Peruvian Pisco Sour or Brazilian Caipirinha all the cocktails will have you feeling the heat of Latin America. A Late Entertainment & Alcohol License will have all Party goers enjoying themselves to the early hours. The Nightclub opens every Thursday, Friday & Saturday as well as Bank Holidays & special dates like NYE & Boxing Day. Be sure to visit if you want to kick back and enjoy authentic Latin Experience in the Heart of the City of London. Both floors of the Nightclub are available for Private hire. We cater for Private Functions, Birthday Parties, Wedding Receptions and any other Private Events so please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Escape Rooms
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
R/O 134 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2TU

02074037179

Based on the Japanese online game 'Takagism', Escape Rooms is a real-life room escape game which requires players to work together to solve hidden puzzles to escape a locked themed room, before the 1-hour timer runs out. This exciting new concept, brings the popular online game into real life and gives players the opportunity to use their intuition, teamwork skills and intelligence to accomplish a unique and challenging task. The game is incredibly popular in Asia, the US and several European countries. Thousands of people have played worldwide and 99% say they would visit again. We are pleased to announce that Escape Rooms London Bridge is now open. We guarantee you an unforgettable experience full of fun, adventure and intrigue.

Nicholson's Pub
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queens Walk
London, United Kingdom

London Stone
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

Old billinsgate London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billinsgate Walk, 16 Lower Thames Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6 DX

Square Meal Exhibition, Old Billingsgate
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billingsgate Walk
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6DX

The Art Academy
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Mermaid Court 165A Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HR

+44 (0)207 407 6969

The Art Academy is an independent art school based in central London, offering a wide range of art education programmes to a diverse community of students, from beginners to postgraduates. Alongside full-time courses (3-year Diploma in Fine Art, 1-year Fine Art Foundation and 2-year Certificate courses), the Academy offers evening classes, part-time study, and weekend and short courses. The Art Academy is recognised for harnessing traditional and contemporary skills in the pursuit of students' individual creative vision, and for the unparalleled degree of individual attention offered by tutorial staff. The Art Academy offers an unrivalled selection of short courses for individuals who want to develop their skills and ideas, whether they have no previous instruction, or are returning to art school to further develop their skills

Lloyds Banking Group, Red Lion Court
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
44- 46 park street, SE1 9EQ
London, United Kingdom SE1 9EQ

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Londer Tower Brigde
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Rd,London SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

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The northern and shell Building
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Number 10 Lower Thames St
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6EN

Agenda Bar / Club (3 Mincing Lane. Central London) Ec3r 7aa
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
3 MINCING LANE. CENTRAL LONDON
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AA

07956557199

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

The City Flogger
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
120 Fenchurch St
London, United Kingdom EC3M 5

20-76233251

Innholders Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
30 College St
London, United Kingdom EC4R 2

020 7236 6703

Bridge Near London Bridge

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

Blackfriars Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Blackfriars Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9UD

020 7928 8998

Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower.HistoryThe first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995ft long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. It was later made toll free.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom

Official Facebook page of London Bridge railway station. In an emergency call 08457 11 41 41. Got a question? networkrail.co.uk/contactus

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

All Bar One Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
34 Shad Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 2YG

20-79409771

Dim T
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JP

02074037000

Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
River Thames
London, United Kingdom SE1 8

0870 500 0600

The Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. It is a steel truss railway bridge – sometimes known as the Charing Cross Bridge – flanked by two more recent, cable-stayed, pedestrian bridges that share the railway bridge's foundation piers, and which are named the Golden Jubilee Bridges.The north end of the bridge is Charing Cross railway station, and is near Embankment Pier and the Victoria Embankment. The south end is near Waterloo station, County Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, and the London Eye. Each pedestrian bridge has steps and lift access.

Lambeth Bridge
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

020 7234 5800

Lambeth Bridge is a road traffic and footbridge crossing the River Thames in an east-west direction in central London, the river flows north at the crossing point. Downstream, the next bridge is Westminster Bridge; upstream the next is Vauxhall Bridge.The most conspicuous colour in the bridge's paint scheme is red, the same colour as the leather benches in the House of Lords which is at the southern end of the Palace of Westminster nearest the bridge. This is in contrast to Westminster Bridge which is predominantly green, the same colour as the benches in the House of Commons at the northern end of the Houses of Parliament.On the east side, in Lambeth are Lambeth Palace, the Albert Embankment, St. Thomas' Hospital, and the International Maritime Organization. On the west side, in Westminster, are Thames House (the headquarters of MI5), behind which is Horseferry House (the National Probation Service headquarters), and Clelland House and Abell House (the headquarters of HM Prison Service), and the Millbank Tower and Tate Britain. The Palace of Westminster is a short walk downstream to the north through the Victoria Tower Garden.

BFI IMAX
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Charlie Chaplin Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XR

The BFI IMAX is an IMAX cinema in the South Bank district of London, just north of Waterloo Station. It is owned by the British Film Institute and since July 2012 has been operated by Odeon Cinemas.The cinema is located in the centre of a roundabout junction with Waterloo Road to the south-east, Stamford Street to the north-east, York Road to the south-west and Waterloo Bridge to the north-west.HistoryThe BFI IMAX was designed by Bryan Avery of Avery Associates Architects and completed in May 1999. The screen is the largest in Britain (20m high and 26m wide). It has a seating capacity of just under 500 and a 12,000 Watt digital surround sound system. Although the site is surrounded by traffic and has an underground line just four metres below, the architects and engineers accounted for this in their design and the entire upper structure sits on anti vibration bearings to prevent noise propagation.The cinema won several awards at the time of opening, including a Design Council Millennium Product Award in 1999 and a Civic Trust Award in 2000.In 2009, the screen was replaced and a digital IMAX projector was installed alongside the existing 70mm projector. In July 2012, the BFI announced that Odeon Cinemas had been selected to operate it for the next five years, with the option of termination after three years. Odeon will maintain the film programmes, and booking of tickets online and per telephone. This also gives customers the opportunity to watch Operas on the giant screen. The BFI will retain a great deal of power over the cinema's operation however, including parts of the film schedule and the technical operation. The name will remain the same.

Strada Italiana, Tower Bridge, London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 More London Place, The Riverside
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JP

020 7403 8321

Nandos - London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
225-227 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

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Gauchos Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Gaucho Tower Bridge, 2 More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom E1W 1

020 7407 5222

wagamama
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment, London
London, United Kingdom

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Azzurro - London Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
35 Tooley St
London, United Kingdom SE1 2QJ

020 7407 5267

Millennium Bridge House / Old Mutual Place
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2 Lambeth Hill
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4GG

020 7002 7000

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Londer Tower Brigde
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Rd,London SE1 2UP
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

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Atlantics
Distance: 3.4 mi Tourist Information
82 Atlantic Rd
London, United Kingdom SW9 8PX

+44 (0) 20 7274 6899

Community and Government Near London Bridge

Guy's Hospital
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
London near London Bridge Station
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

020 7188 7188

Guy's Hospital is a large NHS hospital in the borough of Southwark in central London. It is part of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and one of the institutions that comprise the King's Health Partners, an academic health science centre. It is a large teaching hospital and is, with St Thomas' Hospital and King's College Hospital, the location of King's College London School of Medicine (formerly known as the GKT School of Medicine). The Tower Wing (formerly known as Guy's Tower) is the world's tallest hospital building, standing at with 34 floors.HistoryThe hospital was founded in 1721 by Thomas Guy, a publisher of unlicensed Bibles who had made a fortune in the South Sea Bubble. It was originally established as a hospital to treat "incurables" discharged from St Thomas' Hospital. Guy had been a Governor and benefactor of St Thomas' and his fellow Governors supported his intention by granting the south-side of St Thomas' Street for a peppercorn rent for 999 years. Guy is interred in the crypt of the Chapel of his foundation.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Tower 42
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
25 Old Broad Street
London, United Kingdom EC2N 1

020 7877 7842

Tower 42 is the third-tallest skyscraper in the City of London and the eighth tallest in Greater London. Its original name was the NatWest Tower, having been built to house NatWest's international headquarters. It is still commonly referred to as the NatWest Tower. Seen from above, the shape of the tower resembles that of the NatWest logo (three chevrons in a hexagonal arrangement).The tower, designed by Richard Seifert and engineered by Pell Frischmann, is located at 25 Old Broad Street. It was built by John Mowlem & Co between 1971 and 1980, first occupied in 1980, and formally opened on 11 June 1981 by Queen Elizabeth II.The construction cost was £72 million. It is 183m high, which made it the tallest building in the United Kingdom until the topping out of One Canada Square at Canary Wharf in 1990. It held the status of tallest building in the City of London for 30 years, until it was surpassed by the Heron Tower in December 2009.The building today is multi-tenanted and comprises Grade A office space and restaurant facilities, with one restaurant situated on the 24th floor, and the other, a champagne and seafood bar, on the 42nd floor. In 2011 it was bought by the South African businessman Nathan Kirsh for £282.5 million.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

020 7407 0043

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642.A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 230m from the site of the original theatre. From 1909, the current Gielgud Theatre was called "Globe Theatre", until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.LocationsExamination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the foundations lies beneath 67—70 Anchor Terrace, a listed building, no further excavations have been permitted.

Wagamama's Tower Hill, London Town
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tower Hill, London
London, United Kingdom EC3R 5

020 7283 5897

Lloyd's of London
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 7HA

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Lloyd's of London, generally known simply as Lloyd's, is an insurance market located in London's primary financial district, the City of London. Unlike most of its competitors in the industry, it is not an insurance company. It is a corporate body governed by the Lloyd's Act of 1871 and subsequent Acts of Parliament. It is a partially mutualised marketplace within which multiple financial backers, grouped in syndicates, come together to pool and spread risk. These underwriters, or "members", are a collection of both corporations and private individuals, the latter being traditionally known as "Names".The insurance business underwritten at Lloyd's is predominantly general insurance and reinsurance, although a small number of syndicates write term life assurance. The market has its roots in marine insurance and was founded by Edward Lloyd at his coffee house on Tower Street in around 1688. Today, it has a dedicated building on Lime Street, opened in 1986. Its motto is Fidentia, Latin for "confidence", and it is closely associated with the Latin phrase uberrima fides, or "utmost good faith".

30 ST MARY AXE
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
30 St Mary Axe
London, United Kingdom EC3A 8

More London Riverside
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside SE1 2AU
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AU

London Stone
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

122 Leadenhall Street
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 4

122 Leadenhall Street, or the Leadenhall Building, is a 225 m tall building on Leadenhall Street in London. The commercial skyscraper, opened in July 2014, was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and is informally known as "The Cheesegrater" because of its distinctive wedge shape. It is one of a number of new tall buildings recently completed or currently under construction in the City of London financial area, including 20 Fenchurch Street, 22 Bishopsgate, and The Scalpel.The building is opposite the Lloyd's building, also designed by Rogers, which is the home of the insurance market Lloyd's of London. Until 2007 the Leadenhall site was occupied by the P&O Tower, a building owned by the developer British Land and designed by Gollins Melvin Ward Partnership that was completed in 1968 as a brother to the still existing Commercial Union tower, now called St. Helen's. That building was demolished in preparation for redevelopment of the site. The project, initially delayed due to the financial crisis, was revived in 2010 and Oxford Properties co-developed the property in partnership with British Land.

The Leadenhall Building
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
122 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

Red Bull UK
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
155-171 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JP

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Southwark Crown Court
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 English Grounds
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7522 7200

Crown Court, Southwark, commonly known as the Southwark Crown Court, is one of three Crown Courts in the London SE1 postcode area, along with Inner London Crown Court and Blackfriars Crown Court. Opened in 1983, the brick building is located on the South Bank of the River Thames between London Bridge and Tower Bridge, next to Hay's Galleria. It contains 15 courtrooms, making it the fourth largest court centre in the country, and is a designated as a serious fraud centre.

Skinners Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8 1/2 Downgate Hill, London, EC4R 2SP
London, United Kingdom EC4R 2SP

020 7236 5629

Resonance 104.4fm
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
144 Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1L

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Resonance104.4fm is the world’s first radio art station. A platform for sound and radio art, experimental art practice, specialist musics, free speech and deep thought, we broadcast original content from musicians, artists, scientists, instigators, critics and thinkers from London's kaleidoscopic communities. Resonance FM is a challenging model of community media hailed as "the best radio station in the world". www.resonancefm.com

London Metal Exchange
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
56 Leadenhall Street
London, United Kingdom

020 7264 5555

The London Metal Exchange is the futures exchange with the world's largest market in options and futures contracts on base and other metals. As the LME offers contracts with daily expiry dates of up to three months from trade date, weekly contracts to six months, and monthly contracts up to 123 months, it also allows for cash trading. It offers hedging, worldwide reference pricing, and the option of physical delivery to settle contracts. In July 2012, LME's shareholders voted to sell the exchange to Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing for £1.4 billion.It is located at 10 Finsbury Square in the London Borough of Islington, just to the north of the City of London.HistoryThe London Metal Market and Exchange Company was founded in 1877, but the market traces its origins back to 1571 and the opening of the Royal Exchange, London. Before the exchange was created, business was conducted by traders in London coffee houses using a makeshift ring drawn in chalk on the floor.At first only copper was traded. Lead and zinc were soon added but only gained official trading status in 1920. The exchange was closed during World War II and did not re-open until 1954. The range of metals traded was extended to include aluminium (1978), nickel (1979), tin (1989), aluminium alloy (1992), steel (2008), and minor metals cobalt and molybdenum (2010). The exchange ceased trading plastics in 2011. The total value of the trade is around $US 11.6 trillion annually.

Clothworkers
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
dunster court mincing lane
London, United Kingdom EC3R 7AH

020 7623 7041

Londinium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
8-18 London Bridge St
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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Londinium was a settlement established on the current site of the City of London around 43. Its bridge over the River Thames turned the city into a road nexus and major port, serving as a major commercial centre in Roman Britain until its abandonment during the 5th century.Following its foundation in the mid-1st century, early Londinium occupied the relatively small area of 1.4sqkm, roughly equivalent to the size of present-day Hyde Park, with a fortified garrison on one of its hills. In the year 60 or 61, the rebellion of the Iceni under Boudica forced the garrison to abandon the settlement, which was then razed. Following the Iceni's defeat at the Battle of Watling Street, the city was rebuilt as a planned Roman town and recovered within about a decade. During the later decades of the 1st century, Londinium expanded rapidly, becoming Great Britain's largest city. By the turn of the century, Londinium had grown to about 60,000 people, almost certainly replacing Camulodunum (Colchester) as the provincial capital and by the 2nd century, Londinium was at its height. Its forum and basilica were one of the largest structures north of the Alps, when the Emperor Hadrian visited Londinium in 122. Excavations have discovered evidence of a major fire that destroyed most of the city shortly thereafter, but the city was again rebuilt. By the second half of the 2nd century, Londinium appears to have shrunk in both size and population.

Tallow Chandlers' Hall
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
4 Dowgate Hill
London, United Kingdom

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

Landmark Near London Bridge

The Shard London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

Borough Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
8 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TL

+44 (0) 20 7407 1002

Community Guidelines We love to hear from our friends and visitors and encourage you all to post your photos and experiences about Borough Market. And if you ask us a question, we'll do our very best to answer it! The Page is not the place to advertise your own page or something that's not related to Borough Market. If you do, then we're sorry, but we'll remove your post. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed and you may be banned from our Page. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at the Market, you can email us directly at [email protected] You can find out more about our complaints procedure on our website: http://boroughmarket.org.uk/page/complaints-procedure. Thanks for following us on Facebook - we hope you enjoy our updates!

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

Monument to the Great Fire of London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Monument Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8AH

0207 626 2717

The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in the City of London, near the northern end of London Bridge, that commemorates the Great Fire of London.It stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 ft (62 m) tall and 202 ft (62 m) from the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Another monument, the Golden Boy of Pye Corner, marks the point near Smithfield where the fire was stopped. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be burnt down by the Great Fire.The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farynor, the king's baker, where the Great Fire began.The top of the Monument is reached by a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps. A mesh cage was added in the mid-19th century at the top to prevent people jumping off, after six people had committed suicide from the structure between 1788 and 1842.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

020 7407 0043

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642.A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 230m from the site of the original theatre. From 1909, the current Gielgud Theatre was called "Globe Theatre", until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.LocationsExamination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the foundations lies beneath 67—70 Anchor Terrace, a listed building, no further excavations have been permitted.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

The London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

London Stone
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Cannon Street Railway Bridge
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
103 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AG

020 7929 0831

Cannon Street Railway Bridge is a bridge in central London, crossing the River Thames. Downstream, the next bridge is London Bridge, and upstream Southwark Bridge. It carries trains over the river to Cannon Street station on the north bank. It was originally named Alexandra Bridge after Alexandra of Denmark who was the wife of the future King Edward VII.The bridge was designed by John Hawkshaw and John Wolfe-Barry for the South Eastern Railway. It was opened in 1866 after three years of construction. In its original form, it carried the railway over the Thames on five spans standing on cast-iron Doric pillars. It was subsequently widened between 1886–93 by Francis Brady and extensively renovated by British Rail between 1979–82, which resulted in many of its ornamental features being removed and the structure taking on an even more utilitarian appearance than before.It was the scene of the Marchioness disaster in 1989.

Hays Galleria
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Battle Bridge Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

St Magnus-the-Martyr
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street EC3R 6DN
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

020 7626 4481

St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge is a Church of England church and parish within the City of London. The church, which is located in Lower Thames Street near The Monument to the Great Fire of London, is part of the Diocese of London and under the pastoral care of the Bishop of London and the Bishop of Fulham. It is a Grade I listed building. The rector uses the title "Cardinal Rector", being one of three clerics in the Church of England to use the title Cardinal.St Magnus lies on the original alignment of London Bridge between the City and Southwark. The ancient parish was united with that of St Margaret, New Fish Street, in 1670 and with that of St Michael, Crooked Lane, in 1831. The three united parishes retained separate vestries and churchwardens. Parish clerks continue to be appointed for each of the three parishes.St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without. It is also twinned with the Church of the Resurrection in New York City.

The Shard
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group.

St Stephen's, Walbrook
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
39 Walbrook
London, United Kingdom EC4N 4

20-76269000

St Stephen Walbrook is a church in the City of London, part of the Church of England's Diocese of London. The present domed building was erected to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren following the destruction of its medieval predecessor in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is located in Walbrook, next to the Mansion House, and near to Bank and Monument Underground stations.Early historyThe original church of St Stephen stood on the west side of the Walbrook, a stream running southwards across the City of London from the City Wall near Moorfields to the Thames.The church was moved to its present site, on the east side of the Walbrook (later concealed in a culvert), in the 15th century. In 1429 Robert Chichely, acting as executor of will of the former Lord Mayor, Sir William Stondon, bought a piece of land on the east side of the Walbrook, and presented it to the parish. Several foundation stones were laid at a ceremony on 11 May 1429, and the church was consecrated ten years later, on 30 April 1439. At 125ft long and 67ft wide, it was considerably larger than the present building.The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It contained a memorial to the composer John Dunstaple. The wording of the epitaph had been recorded in the early 17th century, and was reinstated in the church in 1904, some 450 years after his death. The nearby church of St Benet Sherehog, also destroyed in the Great Fire, was not rebuilt; instead its parish was united with that of St Stephen.

Public Places and Attractions Near London Bridge

Shakespeare's Globe
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DT

020 7401 9919 (Box Office)

Please note: This page is monitored Monday - Friday 10am-6pm. If you have an urgent enquiry outside of these hours please call our General Information line on +44 (0)20 7902 1400. Thanks for dropping by our Facebook page. We love to hear from our friends and visitors and we encourage you to engage with information we post about the Globe. Tell us what you thought of our shows, or what you have discovered about Shakespeare. If you ask us a questions we will try our best to answer it. Our page is not the place to advertise your own productions or comments and events that are not related to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre you can email us directly at [email protected] Shakespeare's Globe

Imperial War Museum London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ
London, United Kingdom SE1 6

020 7416 5000

IWM London tells the stories of those whose lives have been shaped by war from the First World War to the present day. Follow us on Facebook and join our growing community of fans. Discover in-depth information about IWM London, special content, and discuss and share with others.

London Dungeon
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28-34 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction in London, England, which recreates various gory and macabre historical events in a gallows humour style. It uses a mixture of live actors, special effects and rides.OverviewOpening in 1974, the attraction was initially designed as a museum of macabre history, but the Dungeon has evolved to become an actor-led, interactive experience. The Dungeon is operated by Merlin Entertainments. In 2013, the London Dungeon moved from its premises on Tooley Street to a new location in County Hall next to the London Eye.FormatThe London Dungeon features 18 shows, 20 actors and 3 rides. Visitors are taken on a journey through 1000 years of London’s history where they meet actors performing as some of London’s most infamous characters, including Jack the Ripper and Sweeney Todd. The Dungeon’s shows are staged on theatrical sets with special effects. The show incorporates events such as the Black Death and the Gunpowder Plot, and includes characters such as "The Torturer", "The Plague Doctor", and "The Judge". Guests are encouraged to participate in the shows. The experience also includes a "drop ride to doom", a free-fall ride staged as a public hanging.

London Bridge
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom

Official Facebook page of London Bridge railway station. In an emergency call 08457 11 41 41. Got a question? networkrail.co.uk/contactus

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

Darwin Brasserie - Sky Garden, the Walkie Talkie Building
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6

0333 772 0020

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2A 2LL

020 7947 6000

The Ten Bells Pub
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
84 Commercial Street
London, United Kingdom E1 6LY

0871 951 1000 (ref 2425)

London Bridge City
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside
London, United Kingdom SE1 2DB

020 7403 4866

From London Bridge to Tower Bridge: a bustling, central riverside destination. London Bridge City includes More London, No.1 London Bridge, Cottons Centre and Hay's Galleria. Come and experience a changing programme of arts, entertainment and events, world-class food and drink against a backdrop of great architecture and historic markets.

BFI IMAX
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Charlie Chaplin Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XR

The BFI IMAX is an IMAX cinema in the South Bank district of London, just north of Waterloo Station. It is owned by the British Film Institute and since July 2012 has been operated by Odeon Cinemas.The cinema is located in the centre of a roundabout junction with Waterloo Road to the south-east, Stamford Street to the north-east, York Road to the south-west and Waterloo Bridge to the north-west.HistoryThe BFI IMAX was designed by Bryan Avery of Avery Associates Architects and completed in May 1999. The screen is the largest in Britain (20m high and 26m wide). It has a seating capacity of just under 500 and a 12,000 Watt digital surround sound system. Although the site is surrounded by traffic and has an underground line just four metres below, the architects and engineers accounted for this in their design and the entire upper structure sits on anti vibration bearings to prevent noise propagation.The cinema won several awards at the time of opening, including a Design Council Millennium Product Award in 1999 and a Civic Trust Award in 2000.In 2009, the screen was replaced and a digital IMAX projector was installed alongside the existing 70mm projector. In July 2012, the BFI announced that Odeon Cinemas had been selected to operate it for the next five years, with the option of termination after three years. Odeon will maintain the film programmes, and booking of tickets online and per telephone. This also gives customers the opportunity to watch Operas on the giant screen. The BFI will retain a great deal of power over the cinema's operation however, including parts of the film schedule and the technical operation. The name will remain the same.

Whitecross Street Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Whitecross Street
London, United Kingdom EC1Y 8NS

020 7527 3830

Tower 42
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
25 Old Broad Street
London, United Kingdom EC2N 1HQ

Paternoster Square
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Paternoster Square
London, United Kingdom EC4M 7

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Paternoster Square is an urban development, owned by the Mitsubishi Estate Co., next to St Paul's Cathedral in the City of London. The area, which takes its name from Paternoster Row, centre of the London publishing trade, was devastated by aerial bombardment in The Blitz during World War II. It is now the location of the London Stock Exchange which relocated there from Threadneedle Street in 2004. It is also the location of investment banks such as Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch and Nomura Securities Co., and of fund manager Fidelity Investments.Pater noster is Latin for "Our Father", the incipit of the Lord's Prayer. The Square lies near the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest part of the City of London.World War II bombingThe City of London was hit by one of the heaviest night raids of The Blitz on the night of 29 December 1940. Buildings on Paternoster Row, housing the publishing companies Simpkins and Marshall, Hutchinsons, Blackwoods, and Longmans and Collins were destroyed. St Paul's Cathedral remained intact.

Marlin Apartments Empire Square, London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
34 Long Lane
London, United Kingdom SE1 4NH

+44 (0)20 7378 2100

More London Riverside
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
More London Riverside SE1 2AU
London, United Kingdom SE1 2AU

The Mermaid Theatre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2 Puddle Dock
London, United Kingdom EC4V 3DB

+44 (0) 20 7236 1919

British Film Institute
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
21 Stephen St
London, United Kingdom W1T 1

020 7255 1444

Old billinsgate London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Old Billinsgate Walk, 16 Lower Thames Street
London, United Kingdom EC3R 6 DX

Mansion House Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
38 Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 6JD

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

The Woolhouse
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
74 Back Church Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 1LU

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Wool House is a grade II listed Victorian wool warehouse at 74 Backchurch Lane, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It was originally five storeys tall, and spanned a total of 137,455 square feet. An additional floor was constructed on the roof in the early 2000s, creating an additional 12,000 square feet of floorspace. The warehouse is one of two that were constructed on Backchurch lane in the late 1880s for Browne & Eagle, a wool storage firm. Wool House underwent a series of redevelopments in the early 21st century. The first of these took place between 1998 and 2003, when the building was refurbished and converted into office space. An extra floor constructed from lightweight materials was also added. In 2005 the offices closed down and the building was redesigned for residential usage. The residential conversion was completed in October 2006. The Wool House is now owned by Octagon Investments which is part of the Yianis Group owned by property magnate John Christodoulou who according to the Times Rich List 2007 is the 82nd wealthiest person in Britain with an estimated personal fortune of £835m.

Public Transportation Near London Bridge

Embankment Pier
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom WC2N 6NU

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Great Eastern Walk
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7Q

08457 484950

Liverpool Street est une station du métro de Londres en correspondance avec la gare de Liverpool Street. La station est sur la Central line, la Circle line, la Hammersmith & City line et la Metropolitan line en zone 1.Lieu remarquable à proximité Gare de Liverpool StreetVoir aussiArticles connexes Attentats du 7 juillet 2005 à Londres Liste des stations du métro de Londres Liste des stations fermées du métro de Londres Stansted Express

Platform Nine and Three Quarters
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
King's Cross Station
London, United Kingdom NW1 2

St Pancras Southeastern High Speed
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
London St Pancras International, Euston Road
London, United Kingdom N1C 4

03457114141

Westminster Millennium Pier
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom SW1A 2JH

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Crowne Plaza London St. James
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
45-51 Buckingham Gate
London, United Kingdom SW1E 6

+44 (0) 20 7834 6655

Holiday Inn King's Cross
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
1 King's Cross Road
London, United Kingdom WC1X 9HX

+44 (0) 20 7833 3900

Blackfriars station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
174 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

02072365474

Blackfriars, also known as London Blackfriars, is a central London railway station and connected London Underground station located in the City of London. Its platforms span the River Thames, occupying the length of Blackfriars Railway Bridge, a short distance downstream from Blackfriars Bridge. Since 2011 there have been station buildings, with passenger entrances, on both sides of the river; the north bank entrance is on the south side of Queen Victoria Street and the south bank entrance, opened in 2011, is adjacent to Blackfriars Road. It is the only London station to span the Thames, with entrances on both banks.The main line station was opened by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway company with the name St. Paul's in 1886. The Underground station opened in 1870 with the arrival of the Metropolitan District Railway. The station was renamed Blackfriars in 1937. National Rail services are now provided by Southeastern and Thameslink while the Underground station is now served by both the District line and, since 1949, the Circle line. The Underground station was closed for renovation work for nearly three years between 2009 and 2012. The station falls within fare zone 1.

Premier Inn London Kings Cross
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
26-30 York Way
London, United Kingdom N1 9AA

0871 527 8672

Right at the hub of London's rail network, Premier Inn King's Cross puts the capital and Europe on your doorstep. With easy connections across the UK, France and Belgium, the world's your oyster.

Tower Millennium Pier
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DT

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

London King's Cross Theatre
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
Good's Way, King's Cross, London, N1C 4UR
London, United Kingdom N1C 4UR

0844 871 7604

Festival Pier
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Riverside Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XZ

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Holborn tube station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
88-94 Kingsway
London, United Kingdom WC2B 6

020 7222 1234

Holborn is a London Underground station in Holborn, central London. It is served by the Central and Piccadilly lines. On the Central line the station is between Tottenham Court Road and Chancery Lane stations; on the Piccadilly line it is between Covent Garden and Russell Square. The station is located at the junction of High Holborn and Kingsway and is in Travelcard Zone 1. Close by are the British Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Red Lion Square, Bloomsbury Square and Sir John Soane's Museum.Located at the junction of two earlier tube railway schemes, the station was opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR). The station entrances and below ground circulation were largely reconstructed for the introduction of escalators and the opening of Central line platforms in 1933, making the station the only interchange between the lines. Before 1994, Holborn was the northern terminus of the short and little-frequented Piccadilly line branch to Aldwych and two platforms originally used for this service are disused. One of the disused platforms has been used for location filming when a London Underground station platform is needed.

Pimlico Station
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
2 Bessborough Street
London, United Kingdom SW1V 2JA

Pimlico Station er en London Underground-station i Pimlico, City of Westminster. Den er på Victoria line mellem Victoria og Vauxhall i takstzone 1. Stationen åbnede den 14. september 1972, mere end et år efter driften på resten af banen var begyndt. Pimlico Station var en sen tilføjelse til den sidste del af Victoria line mellem Victoria og Brixton, og er den eneste station på banen, hvor der ikke er skiftemulighed med en anden Underground- og/eller fjerntogsbane. Det var den sidste Underground-station, der åbnede, før den første del af Piccadilly lines Heathrow-forlængelse blev åbnet til Hatton Cross i 1975. Hovedindgangen er på hjørnet af Bessborough Street og Rampayne Street. Den er en del af en kontorblok, der indtil 2006 udelukkende blev benyttet af Office for National Statistics, bortset fra stationen og en aviskiosk. Der er to øvrige indgange, i Lupus Street og på den anden side af Bessborough Street. Disse har både ramper og trapper, hvilket giver adgang for kørestolsbrugere. Der er dog stadig nogle få trin ned til billethallen.

Vauxhall bus station
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Vauxhall Cross
London, United Kingdom SW8 2LE

+44 343 222 1234

Vauxhall Bus Station serves the area of Vauxhall in the London Borough of Lambeth, England. The station is owned and maintained by Transport for London and is the second busiest in London.The bus station, which is adjacent to the Vauxhall railway and tube stations, is situated on Bondway between Wandsworth Road, Kennington Road and Parry Street.Only one route terminates there, route 156.LayoutIn 2004, bus stops were moved from outlying roads to a central point at the Vauxhall Cross road junction to create an improved transport interchange.The bus station was designed by Arup Associates. It incorporates two cantilevered arms that contain 167 solar panels, which provide a third of the bus station's electricity.The nine stands are served by Transport for London contracted operators Abellio London, Arriva London, London Central and London General.ConnectionsDirectly south next to the bus station is Vauxhall station for London Underground Victoria line and National Rail South West Trains.

Camberwell Bus Garage
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Warner Road
London, United Kingdom SE5 9NE

020 7064 5700

Tower Hill tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station at Tower Hill in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. The station is in fare zone 1. It is a short distance from Tower Gateway DLR station and Fenchurch Street railway station.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which formerly surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.ServicesTrain frequencies vary throughout the day, but the typical off-peak service pattern is:District line:Eastbound:12 tph to Upminster6 tph terminate at Tower Hill6 tph to Ealing Broadway6 tph to Richmond6 tph to WimbledonEastbound:6 tph to Hammersmith via Aldgate6 tph to Edgware Road via Embankment

O Neil's Kings Cross St Pancras
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
73-77 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 2

Bankside Pier
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bankside, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DT

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Blackfriars Millennium Pier
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
The Old Pumphouse, Paul's Walk
London, United Kingdom EC4V 3QR

03432221234

London River Services is responsible for managing this pier.

Tourist Attraction Near London Bridge

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

+44 (0)20 7403 3761

An iconic London landmark and one of Britain's best loved historic sites, Tower Bridge is open to the public 363 days a year. Within the Bridge's iconic structure and magnificent Victorian Engine rooms, the Tower Bridge Exhibition is the best way of exploring the most famous bridge in the world! Come learn about this incredible feat of Victorian engineering, discover how the Bridge is raised and enjoy stunning panoramic views across London from our high-level walkways, 42 metres above the River Thames. Opening Times: 10:00 - 18:30 (last admission 17:30) Facebook is a public page. Please bear this in mind when posting your comments, especially regarding personal information. Further information on the City of London Corporation can be found at www.cityoflondon.gov.uk. The City of London Corporation is always happy to hear from you but please keep posts relevant. All comments will be monitored by Facebook and the City and any comments that are offensive or inappropriate will be removed. People who persistently cause conflict or offence to others will be removed and blocked from our social media pages.

Brick Lane Market
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Brick Lane
London, United Kingdom E1 6SB

Shakespeare's Globe
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DT

020 7401 9919 (Box Office)

Please note: This page is monitored Monday - Friday 10am-6pm. If you have an urgent enquiry outside of these hours please call our General Information line on +44 (0)20 7902 1400. Thanks for dropping by our Facebook page. We love to hear from our friends and visitors and we encourage you to engage with information we post about the Globe. Tell us what you thought of our shows, or what you have discovered about Shakespeare. If you ask us a questions we will try our best to answer it. Our page is not the place to advertise your own productions or comments and events that are not related to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. Likewise if you post spam or abusive messages, your post will be removed. If you're unhappy at anytime with the service or experience you have at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre you can email us directly at [email protected] Shakespeare's Globe

The View from The Shard
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9EX

+44(0)844 499 7111

The View from The Shard is situated at the top of The Shard – the tallest building in Western Europe, and is London’s newest visitor attraction. At almost twice the height of any other viewing platform in London, The View from The Shard offers visitors a 360 degree view of London for up to 40 miles. Advanced tickets are £25.95 for adults and £19.95 for children. Visits are queue and crowd free, and visitors are allowed to stay and enjoy the view for as long as they like. www.theviewfromtheshard.com

Southbank Centre
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 8XX

20-74012636

Hello, and welcome to the official Southbank Centre Facebook page. Keep up to date with our latest news, forthcoming events and festivals and please feel free to comment and review as we love to hear what you think. Southbank Centre includes: › Royal Festival Hall › Hayward Gallery › Queen Elizabeth Hall › Purcell Room › Saison Poetry Library

London Dungeon
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
28-34 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

The London Dungeon is a tourist attraction in London, England, which recreates various gory and macabre historical events in a gallows humour style. It uses a mixture of live actors, special effects and rides.OverviewOpening in 1974, the attraction was initially designed as a museum of macabre history, but the Dungeon has evolved to become an actor-led, interactive experience. The Dungeon is operated by Merlin Entertainments. In 2013, the London Dungeon moved from its premises on Tooley Street to a new location in County Hall next to the London Eye.FormatThe London Dungeon features 18 shows, 20 actors and 3 rides. Visitors are taken on a journey through 1000 years of London’s history where they meet actors performing as some of London’s most infamous characters, including Jack the Ripper and Sweeney Todd. The Dungeon’s shows are staged on theatrical sets with special effects. The show incorporates events such as the Black Death and the Gunpowder Plot, and includes characters such as "The Torturer", "The Plague Doctor", and "The Judge". Guests are encouraged to participate in the shows. The experience also includes a "drop ride to doom", a free-fall ride staged as a public hanging.

Tower Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Tower Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 2UP

Blackfriars Bridge
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Blackfriars Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9UD

020 7928 8998

Blackfriars Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge over the River Thames in London, between Waterloo Bridge and Blackfriars Railway Bridge, carrying the A201 road. The north end is near the Inns of Court and Temple Church, along with Blackfriars station. The south end is near the Tate Modern art gallery and the Oxo Tower.HistoryThe first fixed crossing at Blackfriars was a 995ft long toll bridge designed in an Italianate style by Robert Mylne and constructed with nine semi-elliptical arches of Portland stone. Beating designs by John Gwynn and George Dance, it took nine years to build, opening to the public in 1769. It was the third bridge across the Thames in the then built-up area of London, supplementing the ancient London Bridge, which dated from several centuries earlier, and Westminster Bridge. It was originally named "William Pitt Bridge" (after the Prime Minister William Pitt the Elder) as a dedication, but its informal name relating to the precinct within the City named after the Blackfriars Monastery, a Dominican priory which once stood nearby, was generally adopted. It was later made toll free.

The London Bridge Experience & Tombs
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
2-4 Tooley Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2S

0207 403 6333

Voted the UK's Best Year Round Scare Attraction for three years running, the London Bridge Experience and The London Tombs are two gruesome London tourist attractions not to be missed. Whether you are looking for somewhere scary to take the family, a despicable destination for a school trip, corporate event, celebrate Halloween or a treacherous tourist attraction, you've come to the right place! You'll be taken on a journey through the history of this exciting area of London, from the Roman invasion, right up to the present day with the exciting development of the London Bridge Quarter and the Shard! It is also the perfect place to celebrate Halloween with our 'Phobobophobia' extreme scares show - Halloween's most hellish event. The London Bridge Experience and London Tombs are two attractions for one price!

Whitechapel Gallery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London, United Kingdom E1 7

+44 (0)207 522 7888

For over a century the Whitechapel Gallery has premiered world-class artists from modern masters such as Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Frida Kahlo to contemporaries such as Sophie Calle, Lucian Freud, Gilbert & George and Mark Wallinger. With beautiful galleries, exhibitions, artist commissions, collection displays, historic archives, education resources, inspiring art courses, dining room and bookshop, the Gallery is open all year round, so there is always something free to see. The Gallery is a touchstone for contemporary art internationally, plays a central role in London’s cultural landscape and is pivotal to the continued growth of the world’s most vibrant contemporary art quarter.

Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC2R 1

+44 (0) 20 7947 6000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

The Medieval Banquet, London
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Ivory House, St Katharine Docks
London, United Kingdom E1W 1BP

020 7480 5353

Centrally located in the beautiful and historic setting of St Katharine Docks alongside the River Thames, just a two minute walk from Tower Bridge and the Tower of London, join Henry VIII and his court of knights, troubadours, contortionists, magicians, jugglers, minstrels and medieval tumblers at this most royal of banquets and enjoy a four course feast with beer and red wine brought to your table throughout the meal by our dancing wenches.

Smithfield, London
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
31-32 Watling St
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2

020 7248 3151

Smithfield is a locality in the ward of Farringdon Without situated at the City of London's northwest in central London, England. The principal street of the area is West Smithfield.A number of valued City institutions are located in the area, such as St Bartholomew's Hospital, the Charterhouse, and Livery Halls notably those of the Butchers' and Haberdashers' Companies, but Smithfield is best known for its ancient meat market, dating from the 10th century, which is now London's only remaining wholesale market in continuous operation since medieval times. The area also contains London's oldest surviving church, St Bartholomew-the-Great, founded in 1123 AD.Smithfield has borne witness to many bloody executions of heretics and political rebels over the centuries, including major historical figures such as Scottish patriot Sir William Wallace and Wat Tyler, leader of the Peasants' Revolt, among many other religious reformers and dissenters.

Jack The Ripper Tours
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate East Underground Station
London, United Kingdom E1

020 8530-8443

The Jack the Ripper Tour that is led by published authors and experts on the case. Founded in 1982 by Blue Badge Guide Richard Jones this is the original Aldgate East Jack the Ripper Walk that features genuine Victorian photographs that show the streets are walking through as they were in 1888.

Southwark Tavern, London Bridge
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
22 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1TU

+44 (0)20 7403 0257

The Old Operating Theatre Museum
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
9A St Thomas Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9RY

+4420 7 188 2679

HMS President
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

The Shard
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 2TH

The London Stone
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5AD

020 7626 8246

Train Station Near London Bridge

London Bridge Station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21 Railway Approach
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

03457 11 41 41

London Bridge is the oldest railway station in London, and one of the busiest. Owned and operated by Network Rail. All the history of the station at networkrail.co.uk/virtualarchive/london-bridge/

London Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge (King William Street)
London, United Kingdom SE1

London Fenchurch Street Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 4AJ

Station enquiries 08457 11 41 41

Fenchurch Street was the first railway station to be located within the City of London. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

London Cannon Street Station
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 6AP

03457 11 41 41

Cannon Street station is at the heart of London's financial district and it is closed on Sundays. Owned and operated by Network Rail.

Bank London Underground and DLR Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Bank/Monument Complex, Princes Street
London, United Kingdom EC3V 3LA

08432221234

These transport services are managed by Transport for London.

Liverpool Street London Underground Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Liverpool Street
London, United Kingdom EC2M 7PP

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Blackfriars station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
174 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4

02072365474

Blackfriars, also known as London Blackfriars, is a central London railway station and connected London Underground station located in the City of London. Its platforms span the River Thames, occupying the length of Blackfriars Railway Bridge, a short distance downstream from Blackfriars Bridge. Since 2011 there have been station buildings, with passenger entrances, on both sides of the river; the north bank entrance is on the south side of Queen Victoria Street and the south bank entrance, opened in 2011, is adjacent to Blackfriars Road. It is the only London station to span the Thames, with entrances on both banks.The main line station was opened by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway company with the name St. Paul's in 1886. The Underground station opened in 1870 with the arrival of the Metropolitan District Railway. The station was renamed Blackfriars in 1937. National Rail services are now provided by Southeastern and Thameslink while the Underground station is now served by both the District line and, since 1949, the Circle line. The Underground station was closed for renovation work for nearly three years between 2009 and 2012. The station falls within fare zone 1.

wagamama
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Clink Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DG

020 7403 3659

London Bridge London Underground Station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
21 Duke Street Hill
London, United Kingdom SE1 2SW

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Tower Hill London Underground Station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trinity Square
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4DJ

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Aldgate London Underground Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Aldgate High Street
London, United Kingdom EC3N 1AH

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Monument London Underground Station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
King William Street
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9AA

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Moorgate London Underground Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Moorfields
London, United Kingdom EC2Y 9AE

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

The Green Man Pub - Bank Tube Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
No. 1 Poultry Bank Station exit 9 City of London
London, United Kingdom EC2R 8EJ

020 7248 3529

St. Paul's London Underground Station
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Cheapside
London, United Kingdom EC2V 6AA

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

BPP London Liverpool Street
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
3 London Wall Buildings, Fl 4th
London, United Kingdom EC2M 5PD

Tower Hill tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
24-25 Great Tower St
London, United Kingdom EC3N 4

020 7222 1234

Tower Hill is a London Underground station at Tower Hill in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate, and on the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. The station is in fare zone 1. It is a short distance from Tower Gateway DLR station and Fenchurch Street railway station.The entrance to Tower Hill station is a few metres from one of the largest remaining segments of the Roman London Wall which formerly surrounded the historic City of London. The station was built on the site of the former Tower of London tube station that closed in 1884. The present Tower Hill station opened in 1967 and replaced a nearby station with the same name but which was originally called Mark Lane, that was slightly farther west.ServicesTrain frequencies vary throughout the day, but the typical off-peak service pattern is:District line:Eastbound:12 tph to Upminster6 tph terminate at Tower Hill6 tph to Ealing Broadway6 tph to Richmond6 tph to WimbledonEastbound:6 tph to Hammersmith via Aldgate6 tph to Edgware Road via Embankment

Blackfriars London Underground Station
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
179 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4DD

08432221234

This transport service is operated by Transport for London.

Fenchurch Seafood Bar & Grill, 20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch St
London, United Kingdom EC3M 3BY

0333 772 0020

Mansion House Station
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
38 Cannon Street
London, United Kingdom EC4N 6JD

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Landmark Near London Bridge

Fishmongers Hall
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Fishmongers' Hall, London Bridge
London, United Kingdom EC4R 9EL

0207 626 3531

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, United Kingdom SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

Billingsgate Fish Market
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Billingsgate
Sheffield, United Kingdom

Billingsgate Fish Market is located in Poplar in London which is the United Kingdom's largest inland fish market. It takes its name from Billingsgate, a ward in the south-east corner of the City of London, where the riverside market was originally established. In its original location in the 19th century, Billingsgate was the largest fish market in the world.HistoryCity of LondonBillingsgate Wharf, close to Lower Thames Street, became the centre of a fish market during the 16th and 17th centuries but did not become formally established until an Act of Parliament in 1699.In 1850, the market according to Horace Jones, "consisted only of shed buildings... The open space on the north of the well-remembered Billingsgate Dock was dotted with low booths and sheds, with a range of wooden houses with a piazza in front on the west, which served the salesmen and fishmongers as shelter, and for the purposes of carrying on their trade." In that year the market was rebuilt to a design by J.B. Bunning, the City architect.Bunning's buildings was soon found to be insufficient for the increased trade, and in 1872 the Corporation obtained an Act to rebuild and enlarge the market, which was done to plans by Bunning's successor as City architect Sir Horace Jones. The new site covered almost twice the area of the old, incorporating Billingsgate Stairs and Wharf and Darkhouse Lane. Work began in 1874, and the new market was opened by the Lord Mayor on 20 July 1877. The new buildings, Italianate in style, had on their long frontages towards Thames Street the river, a pedimented centre and continuous arcade, flanked at each end by a pavilion tavern. The general market, on a level with Thames Street, had an area of about 30,000 square feet, and was covered with louvre glass roofs, 43ft high at the ridge. A gallery 30ft wide was allocated to the sale of dried fish, while the basement, served as a market for shellfish.

London Bridge bus station
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge Unit 10
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SP

020 7357 0069

London Bridge bus station serves the London Bridge area of the city of London and is situated at the London Bridge tube and rail station.There are three stands at the station which are situated on the station forecourt.London Buses routes 17, 43, 48, 141, 149 and 521 and night routes N21 and N343 serve the station.New bus stationA new bus station was built as part of the new Shard London Bridge "Gem" development which was open in 2012.

Pudding Lane
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Pudding lane
London, United Kingdom

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Pudding Sokağı İngiltere'nin başkenti Londra'da bulunan dar bir geçittir. 1666 yılında çıkan Büyük Londra Yangını'nın başlangıç noktası olan Thomas Farryner'ın ekmek fırını bu sokakta yer almıştır. Londra Köprüsü'ne yakın bir alandadır. Tarihçi John Stow'un söylediklerine göre sokak adını, eski İngilizcede iç organ demek olan Pudding sözcüğünden almıştır. Bu da söylenceye göre Thames Nehri'ndeki çöp kayıklarına kasapların atmış olduğu sakatatı taşıyan at arabalarından düşen hayvan iç organlarıdır.

St Clement's, Eastcheap
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Clement's Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 7AE

020 7623 5454

St Clement Eastcheap is a Church of England parish church in Candlewick Ward of the City of London. It is located on Clement's Lane, off King William Street and close to London Bridge and the River Thames.Clement was a disciple of St Peter the Apostle and was ordained as Bishop of Rome in the year 93 AD. By legend, Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the Black Sea, which led to his adoption as a patron saint of sailors. The dedication to St Clement is unusual in London, with only one other ancient church there dedicated to this saint, namely St Clement Danes, Westminster. It is also located a little north of the Thames, but further west from Eastcheap and outside the old City boundary, just beyond the Temple Bar on the Strand.HistoryMedieval periodEastcheap was one of the main streets of medieval London. The name 'Eastcheap' derives from the Saxon word 'cheap', meaning a market, and Eastcheap was so called to distinguish it from Westcheap, later to become Cheapside. The southern end of Clement's Lane opened onto Eastcheap until the 1880s when the construction of King William Street separated Clement's Lane from Eastcheap, which still remains nearby as a street.

Hay's Galleria
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
2 Battlebridge Lane, Southwark
London, United Kingdom SE1 2

020 7403 3583

Hay's Galleria is a mixed use building in the London Borough of Southwark situated on the south bank of the River Thames including offices, restaurants, shops and flats. Originally a warehouse and associated wharf for the port of London, it was redeveloped in the 1980s. It is a Grade II listed structure.HistoryHay's WharfHay's Galleria is named after its original owner, the merchant Alexander Hay, who acquired the property - then a brewhouse - in 1651. In around 1840 John Humphrey Jnr acquired a lease on the property. He asked William Cubitt (who was father-in-law to two of Humphrey's sons) to convert it into a 'wharf', in fact an enclosed dock, in 1856 and it was renamed Hay's Wharf.During the nineteenth century, the wharf was one of the chief delivery points for ships bringing tea to the Pool of London. At its height, 80% of the dry produce imported to London passed through the wharf, and on this account the Wharf was nicknamed 'the Larder of London'. The Wharf was largely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Southwark in June 1861 and then continued in use for nearly a century until it was badly bombed in September 1940 during the Second World War. The progressive adoption of containerisation during the 1960s led to the shipping industry moving to deep water ports further down the Thames and the subsequent closure of Hay's Wharf in 1970.

St Dunstan-in-the-East
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
St Dunstan's Hill
London, United Kingdom EC3R 8

St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan's Hill, halfway between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. The church was largely destroyed in the Second World War and the ruins are now a public garden.HistoryThe church was originally built in about 1100. A new south aisle was added in 1391 and the church was repaired in 1631 at a cost of more than £2,400.It was severely damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rather than being completely rebuilt, the damaged church was patched up between 1668 and 1671. A steeple was added in 1695–1701 to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren. It was built in a gothic style sympathetic to main body of the church, though with heavy string courses of a kind not used in the Middle Ages. It has a needle spire carried on four flying buttresses in the manner of that of St Nicholas in Newcastle. The restored church had wooden carvings by Grinling Gibbons and an organ by Father Smith, which was transferred to the abbey at St Albans in 1818.In 1817 it was found that the weight of the nave roof had thrust the walls seven inches out of the perpendicular. It was decided to rebuild the church from the level of the arches, but the state of the structure proved so bad that the whole building was taken down. It was rebuilt to a design in the perpendicular style by David Laing (then architect to the Board of Customs) with assistance from William Tite. The foundation stone was laid in November 1817 and the church re-opened for worship in January 1821. Built of Portland stone, with a plaster lierne nave vault, it was 115 feet long and 65 feet wide and could accommodate between six and seven hundred people. The cost of the work was £36,000. Wren's tower was retained in the new building.

The Shard London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

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The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group. HOUSE RULES Welcome to The Shard, in the heart of London Bridge. We hope our Facebook page can be a place where our community can feel free to express their feelings and opinions about The Shard or share their experiences with our building, our businesses or our neighbourhood. We welcome feedback, both positive and negative, and we aim to respond to comments that necessitate an answer promptly. Our Facebook house rules are designed to serve as a guideline to ensure our online community can enjoy our Facebook page in a pleasant environment. Guidelines First of all, we ask that you please use polite language and tone at all times. Please be mindful that our page attracts a wide audience and we ask that your comments are respectful and on-topic. It’s the policy of The Shard’s Facebook team that we don’t normally moderate Facebook posts, but we won’t tolerate abusive language, disruptive behaviour or illegal or objectionable content. This includes any material which might be defamatory, offensive, infringing, obscene, lewd, pornographic, violent, abusive, insulting, threatening, harassing, discriminatory, blasphemous, indecent or otherwise unlawful or objectionable. It also includes any material which is aggressive, argumentative or likely to be construed as bullying. No spamming or repetition, please, nor off-topic material in subject-specific threads or areas. We also will not tolerate language, content, postings or links that we consider racist, sexist, homophobic or grossly off-topic. If we consider a posting to fit any of these categories, it will be removed from our Facebook page. Get in Touch There’s a chance we might miss something, so if you are concerned that a user is breaking these rules on our Facebook page, please do let us know. Or if you feel we’ve hidden your post unnecessarily, we’re happy to provide an explanation. You can message us directly via this Facebook page or you can email us via [email protected] And do please keep in mind that the comments expressed within our Facebook page, unless an official post from The Shard, come from you – our community of fans – and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Shard.

London Stone
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
109 Cannon St
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

02076268246

London Stone is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance. These assertions however, are completely unsubstantiated.DescriptionThe present London Stone is only the upper portion of a once much larger object, as described below under History. The surviving portion is a block of oolitic limestone approximately 53 cm wide, 43 cm high, and 30 cm front to back (21 × 17 × 12 inches). A study in the 1960s indicated that the stone is Clipsham Limestone, a good-quality stone from Rutland transported to London for building purposes in both the Roman and medieval periods. More recently Kevin Hayward has suggested that it may be Bath stone, the stone most used for monuments and sculpture in early Roman London and in Saxon times.

St Mary Abchurch
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Abchurch Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4N 5

20-76260306

St Mary Abchurch is a Church of England church off Cannon Street in the City of London. Dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it is first mentioned in 1198–1199. The medieval church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and replaced by the present building.HistoryMedieval churchThe church dates back to the twelfth century and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The additional name "Abchurch" may be a variant of "Upchurch", referring to its position on comparatively high ground.The patronage of the church belonged to the convent of St Mary Overy, Southwark, until around 1455, when it passed to the master and chaplains of the college of Corpus Christi at the church of St Laurence Pountney. After the Reformation, Archbishop Parker persuaded Elizabeth I to grant the church to his college, Corpus Christi, Cambridge, which has appointed the incumbent ever since."Restored and beautified" in 1611 at the cost of the parishioners, St Mary's was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666.RebuildingThe church was rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren in 1681–1686. The parish was united with that of the nearby church of St Laurence Poutney, also destroyed in the Great Fire but not rebuilt.Wartime damage and repairA bomb hit the church in September 1940 during the London Blitz. The greatest damage was to the dome. Godfrey Allen repaired the church between 1948–1953.

The Shard
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
32 London Bridge Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 9SG

The iconic Shard, at 310m high (1,016 ft), is Europe’s first vertical town. Designed by Renzo Piano, its 72 floors comprise a 26-floor office complex, three world-class restaurants, a 19-floor five-star Shangri-La Hotel, 13 floors of exclusive residential apartments and the UK’s highest viewing galleries. The Shard is the tallest building in the European Union and was opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The Shard is jointly owned by the State of Qatar and the Sellar Property Group.

Hop Exchange
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
24 Southwark Street
London, United Kingdom SE1 1

The Hop Exchange is a Grade II listed building at No. 24 Southwark Street, London, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. Opened in 1867 and designed by R.H. Moore it served as the centre for hop trading for the brewing industry.OverviewHops, introduced to England from the Netherlands, are still used in the brewing industry. They are harvested from farms (known as "hop gardens") in Kent, and in the 19th century they were brought by railway to London Bridge Station, or by boat up the River Thames. They were then stored in the many warehouses in the Borough area.The purpose of the Hop Exchange was to provide a single market centre for dealers in hops. A glass roof allowed business on the trading floor of the Great Hall to be conducted under natural light. There were many similar outcry floor exchanges across London, such as the Coal, Metal and Stock exchanges, but wartime bombing, fires, redevelopment and modernisation have left the Hop Exchange the only one still standing. However, a fire in 1920 led to the top two storeys being removed, and the Hop Exchange was then converted into offices.

St Margaret Pattens
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
18 Rood Lane
London, United Kingdom EC3M 1HS

20-76236630

St Margaret Pattens is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Eastcheap near the Monument. The dedication is to St. Margaret of Antioch.HistoryThe church was first recorded in 1067, at which time the church was probably built from wood. It was rebuilt in stone at some unknown subsequent date but fell into disrepair and had to be demolished in 1530. It was rebuilt in 1538 but was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. The present church was built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687. It is one of only a few City churches to have escaped significant damage in the Second World War.In 1954 St Margaret Pattens ceased to be a parish church and became one of the City’s guild churches, within the living of the Lord Chancellor and under the jurisdiction of the Bishop of London. They have a regular weekday, rather than Sunday congregation, drawn mostly from people who work in offices nearby.The church was designated a Grade I listed building on 4 January 1950.BuildingThe church's exterior is notable for its 200-ft high spire, Wren's third highest and the only one that he designed in a medieval style. This is sometimes referred to as Wren's only "true spire". Its interior is a simple rectangle with some unusual fittings – the only canopied pews in London, dating from the 17th century. These were intended for the churchwardens. The initials "CW" which appear in one of the pews have been thought to refer to Christopher Wren, but they may also signify "church warden." Other features in the interior include a punishment box carved with the Devil's head where wrongdoers had to sit during the church service.

HMS Belfast
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
The Queen's Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 2JH

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

20 Fenchurch Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
20 Fenchurch Street
London, United Kingdom EC3M 6

20 Fenchurch Street is a commercial skyscraper in London that takes its name from its address on Fenchurch Street, in the historic City of London financial district. It has been nicknamed 'The Walkie-Talkie' because of its distinctive shape. Construction was completed in spring 2014, and the top-floor 'sky garden' was opened in January 2015. The 34-storey building is 160m tall, making it the sixth-tallest building in the City of London and the 12th tallest in London.Designed by architect Rafael Viñoly and costing over £200 million, 20 Fenchurch Street features a highly distinctive top-heavy form which appears to burst upward and outward. A large viewing deck, bar and restaurants are included on the top three floors; these are, with restrictions, open to the public.The tower was originally proposed at nearly 200m tall but its design was scaled down after concerns about its visual impact on the nearby St Paul's Cathedral and Tower of London. It was subsequently approved in 2006 with the revised height. Even after the height reduction there were continued concerns from heritage groups about its impact on the surrounding area. The project was consequently the subject of a public inquiry; in 2007 this ruled in the developers' favour and the building was granted full planning permission. In 2015 it was awarded the Carbuncle Cup for the worst new building in the UK in the previous 12 months.

Lime Street, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Bootlegger, 25-26 Lime Street
London, United Kingdom

Lime Street is a minor road in the City of London between Fenchurch Street to the south and Leadenhall Street to the north. Its name comes from the lime burners who once sold lime from there for use in construction.It is perhaps best known as the current home of the world's largest insurance market, Lloyd's of London, since its newest building was opened on the street in 1986. Opposite Lloyd's, the Willis Building is the global headquarters of insurance broker Willis. A 35-storey building has been proposed at 52-54 Lime Street, and upon approval and completion by 2017 will become the European headquarters of global insurer W. R. Berkley.The northern portion of the street is pedestrianised. Vehicular through-access to Leadenhall Street is prevented by a firegate, forcing drivers to bear right onto Fenchurch Avenue, from which a left turn onto Billiter Street returns vehicles to Leadenhall Street.Nearby is the Norman Foster-designed and gherkin-shaped skyscraper 30 St Mary Axe, and the Leadenhall Building. Leadenhall Market is on Lime Street's western side, adjacent to Lloyd's.

Lloyd's Coffee House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Gracechurch Street 55
London, United Kingdom EC3V 9

020 7621 0911

Lloyd's Coffee House was a coffee shop in London opened by Edward Lloyd (c. 1648–15 February 1713) originally on Tower Street in around 1688. The establishment was a popular place for sailors, merchants and shipowners, and Lloyd catered to them with reliable shipping news. The shipping industry community frequented the place to discuss insurance deals among themselves. The dealing that took place led to the establishment of the insurance market Lloyd's of London, Lloyd's Register and several related shipping and insurance businesses.Just after Christmas 1691, the coffee shop relocated to Lombard Street. Merchants continued to discuss insurance matters here until 1774 when the participating members of the insurance arrangement formed a committee and moved to the Royal Exchange on Cornhill as the Society of Lloyd's.Traces of the coffee houseThe 17th century original shop frontage of Lloyd's Coffee House is owned by Lloyd's of London and has been re-erected on display at the National Maritime Museum. A blue plaque in Lombard Street commemorates the coffee house's second location (now occupied at ground level by Sainsbury's supermarket). It was fictionalized in the 1936 film Lloyd's of London.

Globe Theatre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
21 New Globe Walk, Bankside, London
London, United Kingdom SE1 9

020 7407 0043

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeare's playing company, the Lord Chamberlain's Men, on land owned by Thomas Brend and inherited by his son, Nicholas Brend and grandson Sir Matthew Brend, and was destroyed by fire on 29 June 1613. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614 and closed by an Ordinance issued on 6 September 1642.A modern reconstruction of the Globe, named "Shakespeare's Globe", opened in 1997 approximately 230m from the site of the original theatre. From 1909, the current Gielgud Theatre was called "Globe Theatre", until it was renamed (in honour of John Gielgud) in 1994.LocationsExamination of old property records has identified the plot of land occupied by the Globe as extending from the west side of modern-day Southwark Bridge Road eastwards as far as Porter Street and from Park Street southwards as far as the back of Gatehouse Square. However, the precise location of the building remained unknown until a small part of the foundations, including one original pier base, was discovered in 1989 beneath the car park at the rear of Anchor Terrace on Park Street. The shape of the foundations is now replicated on the surface. As the majority of the foundations lies beneath 67—70 Anchor Terrace, a listed building, no further excavations have been permitted.