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221B Baker Street, London | Tourist Information


221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 2ND

02072243688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

Landmark Near 221B Baker Street

Apsley House
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Apsley House
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park Corner, 149 Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

020 7499 5676

Apsley House, also known as Number One, London, is the London townhouse of the Dukes of Wellington. It stands alone at Hyde Park Corner, on the south-east corner of Hyde Park, facing south towards the busy traffic roundabout in the centre of which stands the Wellington Arch. It is a Grade I listed building.It is sometimes referred to as the Wellington Museum. The house is now run by English Heritage and is open to the public as a museum and art gallery, exhibiting 83 paintings from the Spanish royal collection. The 9th Duke of Wellington retains the use of part of the buildings. It is perhaps the only preserved example of an English aristocratic town house from its period. The practice has been to maintain the rooms as far as possible in the original style and decor. It contains the 1st Duke's collection of paintings, porcelain, the silver centrepiece made for the Duke in Portugal, c. 1815, sculpture and furniture. Antonio Canova's heroic marble nude of Napoleon as Mars the Peacemaker made 1802–10, holding a gilded Nike in the palm of his right hand, and standing to the raised left hand holding a staff. It was set up for a time in the Louvre and was bought by the Government for Wellington in 1816 (according to Nikolaus Pevsner) and stands in Adam's Stairwell.

Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hyde Park
London, SW7 1

+44 20 7298 2000

The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fountain is a memorial in London dedicated to Diana, Princess of Wales, who died in a car crash in 1997. It was designed to express Diana's spirit and love of children.The fountain is located in the southwest corner of Hyde Park, just south of the Serpentine lake and east of the Serpentine Gallery. Its cornerstone was laid in September 2003 and it was officially opened on 6 July 2004 by Queen Elizabeth II. Also present were Diana's younger brother Charles Spencer, her ex-husband Prince Charles, and her sons William and Harry.DesignThe fountain was designed by Kathryn Gustafson, an American landscape artist, and cost £3.6 million. Gustafson said she had wanted the fountain, which was built to the south of the Serpentine, to be accessible and to reflect Diana's "inclusive" personality. Gustafson said: "Above all I hope that it provides a fitting memorial for the princess and does credit to the amazing person that she was."ConstructionThe 545 individual pieces of Cornish granite were cut using sophisticated computer-guided cutting machines by S. McConnell & Sons, in Kilkeel, Northern Ireland.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Bridgewater House, Westminster
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
14 Cleveland Row
London, SW1A 1

Bridgewater House is a townhouse located at 14 Cleveland Row in the St James's area of London, England. It is a Grade I listed building.HistoryThe earliest known house on the site was Berkshire House, built in about 1626-27 for Thomas Howard, second son of the Earl of Suffolk and Master of the Horse to Charles I of England when he was Prince of Wales. Howard was later created Earl of Berkshire.After being occupied by Parliamentarian troops in the English Civil War, used for the Portuguese Embassy, and lived in by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, the house was lived in by Charles II's mistress Barbara Villiers, who was made Duchess of Cleveland in 1670, following which the house was known as Cleveland House. She refaced the old house and added new wings. After being owned for some years by a speculator, the house was sold in 1700 to John Egerton, 3rd Earl of Bridgewater, after which it passed by inheritance until 1948.Cleveland House was re-designed in the Palazzo style by Sir Charles Barry in 1840. The rebuilding was completed and renamed in 1854 for Lord Ellesmere, heir of the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. It is built in Bath stone with a slate roof in three storeys with a basement.

Park Lane Hotel
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Piccadilly
London, W1J 7

The Sheraton Grand London Park Lane is a 5 Star hotel on Piccadilly, London.The hotel opened in 1927 as The Park Lane Hotel to designs by architects Adie, Button and Partners, in a grand Art Deco style, and was constructed by the developer Sir Bracewell Smith. The building is a fine example with a mansard roof and Portland stone facade. The building is Grade II listed and has 303 bedrooms on eight floors with the front overlooking Green Park towards Buckingham Palace.The hotel was bought by ITT Sheraton in April 1996 for $70 million. ITT Sheraton was itself bought by Starwood Hotels in 1998. Starwood sold their leasehold on the hotel to Sir Richard Sutton’s Settled Estates in 2014, but continues to operate the property, under a long-term management contract. Though the hotel was a Sheraton property from 1996 on, it did not actually begin using the Sheraton name for twenty years, until July 19, 2016, when it was renamed Sheraton Grand London Park Lane upon the completion of a major renovation.The hotel is featured in the films The End of the Affair, The Winds of War and The Golden Compass.

Embassy of Japan, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hell on Earth for Dolphins
London,

The Embassy of Japan in London is the diplomatic mission of Japan in the United Kingdom. It occupies a large Victorian building on Piccadilly opposite Green Park, which is Grade II listed.

Hilton London Hyde Park Hotel
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
129 Bayswater Road
London, W2 4RJ

The Hilton London Hyde Park is a hotel situated on Bayswater Road, overlooking Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens in central London. It was opened in July 1999.The building was originally the Coburg Court Hotel, first opened in 1907, and it was later renamed the Coburg Hotel in the early 1960s.The Coburg Hotel was used as a filming location in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972). Richard Blaney and Babs Milligan check into the Coburg as "Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wilde". Filming took place at the hotel during September 1971. The interiors of the Coburg Hotel were mostly recreated at Pinewood Studios, except for the policemen's point-of-view shot showing the fire escape, which was filmed by assistant director Colin M. Brewer from a fifth-floor room.The current hotel is the first Hilton Hotels & Resorts hotel in London with a state-of-the-art meeting room featuring an interactive projection and speaker system.

Bavarian Village
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Serpentine Road, Hyde Park
London, W2 2UH

LIKE US http://www.facebook.com/bavarian.village WATCH US http://www.youtube.com/thebavarianvillage

Bonhams London to Brighton Veteran Car Run supported by Hiscox
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Serpentine Road, Hyde Park
London, W2 2UH

The annual November event attracts entrants from all over the globe and for the owners of these highly valuable veteran cars it represents a rare opportunity to take their extraordinary automobiles on the historic 60-mile run from Hyde Park in central London to the seafront on the Sussex resort of Brighton.

St James's Street
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Spencer House/27 St. James's Pl
London, SW1A 1LE

20-74951771

St James's Street is the principal street in the district of St James's, central London. It runs from Piccadilly downhill to St James's Palace and Pall Mall. The main gatehouse of the palace is at the southern end of the road, and in the 17th century Clarendon House faced down the street across Piccadilly on the site of most of Albemarle Street.St James's Street was built up without an over-all plan but received a boost with Lord St Albans' planned construction of St. James's Square. Today St James's Street contains several of London's best known gentlemen's clubs, such as Brooks's, the Carlton Club and White's, some exclusive shops and various offices. A series of small side streets on its western side lead to some extremely expensive properties overlooking Green Park, including Spencer House and the Royal Over-Seas League at the end of Park Place.Two 18th-century yards survive behind the noble frontages and giant orders of columns or pilasters of the street. One is Blue Ball Yard, with stables built in 1742. The other is Pickering Place, with four informal Georgian brick houses of 1731. Jermyn Street leads off St James's Street to the east. The nearest tube station is Green Park to the west on Piccadilly.

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

Embassy of Qatar, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
1 South Audley St
London, W1K 1

+442074932200

The Embassy of Qatar at 1 South Audley Street in Mayfair, London is the diplomatic mission of Qatar in the United Kingdom. The embassy is housed in a Grade II listed three storey house designed by the architect Frederick Pepys Cockerell and completed after his death by George Aitchison.The exterior of the house is richly decorated with a terracotta freize depicting putti.Qatar also maintains a Cultural and Military Section at 21 Hertford Street, Mayfair and a Health Section at 30 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington.In 2013 there was a protest outside the embassy against the alleged mistreatment of migrant workers in Qatar.

High Commission of The Bahamas, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
10 Chesterfield Street
London, W1J 5JL

02074084488

The High Commission of The Bahamas in London is the diplomatic mission of The Bahamas in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, W1J 5

+44 (0) 20 7917 3000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
30 Charles Street
London, W1J 5

+44 (0) 20 7917 3000

The Embassy of Saudi Arabia in London (officially the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia) (السفارة السعودية الملكية في لندن) is the diplomatic mission of Saudi Arabia in the United Kingdom. Saudi Arabia also maintains a Defence Attaché’s Office at 26 Queen's Gate, South Kensington, a Diplomatic Office of the Cultural Bureau at 630 Chiswick High Road, Gunnersbury, a Medical Section at 60 Queen Anne Street, Marylebone, a Commercial Section at 15/16 Queen Street, Mayfair, an Islamic Affairs Section at 2nd Floor, Park Lorne, 111 Park Road, Lisson Grove and an Information Section at 18 Seymour Street, Marylebone.The embassy is situated in Crewe House, a detached mansion designed and constructed by Edward Sheppard in 1730, set in its own grounds. Built in the Georgian style, it is a Grade II* listed building. The house was considerably altered in the late 18th and early 19th-century. Much of its neo-classical interior dates from the early 19th-century, and some of Shepard's original plasterwork ceilings may survive.

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane,
London, W1K 1QA

020 7629 8888

Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester is a restaurant located in The Dorchester, a hotel in Park Lane, London. It is one of 27 restaurants operated by French chef Alain Ducasse: the head chef is Jean-Philippe Blondet, who replaced Jocelyn Herland in January 2016. Since 2010, it has been one of four UK-sited restaurants to hold three Michelin stars. It opened in 2007 to mixed opinions, but the reviews have since improved.DescriptionAt the time of opening, Alain Ducasse at the Dorchester was one of 27 restaurants around the world operated by Ducasse. He intended the restaurant to have "the modernity of Beige in Tokyo, the seriousness of La Plaza Athénée in Paris and the flavours of Le Louis XV in Monaco meeting the energy of London."The Head Chef was originally intended to be Nicola Canuti, but Canuti was replaced before opening by Jocelyn Herland, who moved from Ducasse's La Plaza Athénée in Paris. Patrick Jouin designed the interior of the restaurant, in light coffee and cream colours. The tables feature ceramic vegetables as centrepieces, handmade butter dishes in pink marble, and Porthault linen tablecloths.The restaurant features a special table for up to six diners called the "Table Lumière", which is surrounded by a thin white curtain which allows diners at the table to view out into the restaurant but prevents other diners from viewing in, and is lit by 4,500 fibre optic lights. Diners who book this table are allowed to select from a choice of tableware and menus, described by the restaurant as being a bespoke dining experience.

Embassy of Myanmar, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
19A Charles St
London, W1J 5DX

+44 (0) 207 499 4340

The Embassy of Myanmar in London, also referred to as the Embassy of Burma, is the diplomatic mission of Myanmar in the United Kingdom.

Embassy of Egypt, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
26 South Street
London, W1K 2XD

20-74993304

The Embassy of Egypt in London is the diplomatic mission of Egypt in the United Kingdom.Egypt also maintains several other buildings in London: a Consulate General at 2 Lowndes Street, Belgravia, a Press & Information Office at 299 Oxford Street, a Cultural Office at 4 Chesterfield Gardens, Mayfair and a Medical Office at 47 Longridge Road, Earl's Court.There have been several protests outside the embassy in recent years: in 2011 during the protests against Hosni Mubarak, in 2013 following the violent clashes in Cairo between supporters and opponents of Mohammed Morsi and also in 2013 there was a protest against the rise of sexual attacks against women in Egypt.

Embassy of Egypt, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
26 South Street
London, W1K 2XD

20-74993304

The Embassy of Egypt in London is the diplomatic mission of Egypt in the United Kingdom.Egypt also maintains several other buildings in London: a Consulate General at 2 Lowndes Street, Belgravia, a Press & Information Office at 299 Oxford Street, a Cultural Office at 4 Chesterfield Gardens, Mayfair and a Medical Office at 47 Longridge Road, Earl's Court.There have been several protests outside the embassy in recent years: in 2011 during the protests against Hosni Mubarak, in 2013 following the violent clashes in Cairo between supporters and opponents of Mohammed Morsi and also in 2013 there was a protest against the rise of sexual attacks against women in Egypt.

Park Lane
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Park Lane, South Kensington, London. UK.
London, W1K 7

Park Lane is a major road in the City of Westminster, in Central London. It is part of the London Inner Ring Road and runs from Hyde Park Corner in the south to Marble Arch in the north. It separates Hyde Park to the west from Mayfair to the east. The road has a number of historically important properties and hotels and has been one of the most sought after streets in London, despite being a major traffic thoroughfare.The road was originally a simple country lane on the boundary of Hyde Park, separated by a brick wall. Aristocratic properties appeared during the late 18th century, including Breadalbene House, Somerset House and Londonderry House. The road grew in popularity during the 19th century after improvements to Hyde Park Corner and more affordable views of the park, which attracted the nouveau riche to the street and led to it becoming one of the most fashionable roads to live on in London. Notable residents included the 1st Duke of Westminster's residence at Grosvenor House, the Dukes of Somerset at Somerset House and the British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli at No. 93. Other historic properties include Dorchester House, Brook House and Dudley House. In the 20th century, Park Lane became well known for its luxury hotels, particularly The Dorchester, completed in 1931, which became closely associated with eminent writers and international film stars. Flats and shops began appearing on the road, including penthouse flats. Several buildings suffered damage during World War II, yet the road still attracted significant development, including the Park Lane Hotel and the London Hilton on Park Lane, and several sports car garages. A number of properties on the road today are owned by some of the wealthiest businessmen from the Middle East and Asia. Current residents include business mogul Mohamed Al-Fayed and former council leader Dame Shirley Porter.

Burlington House
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
31 Burlington Arcade
London, W1J 0PG

Burlington House is a building on Piccadilly in London. It was originally a private Palladian mansion, and was expanded in the mid-19th century after being purchased by the British government. The main building is at the northern end of the courtyard and houses the Royal Academy, while five learned societies occupy the two wings on the east and west sides of the courtyard and the Piccadilly wing at the southern end. These societies, collectively known as the Courtyard Societies are:Geological Society of London (Piccadilly/east wing)Linnean Society of London (Piccadilly/west wing)Royal Astronomical Society (west wing)Society of Antiquaries of London (west wing)Royal Society of Chemistry (east wing) Burlington House is most familiar to the general public as the venue for the Royal Academy's temporary art exhibitions.HistoryThe house was one of the earliest of a number of very large private residences built on the north side of Piccadilly, previously a country lane, from the 1660s onwards. The first version was begun by Sir John Denham about 1664. It was a red-brick double-pile hip-roofed mansion with a recessed centre, typical of the style of the time, or perhaps even a little old fashioned. Denham may have acted as his own architect, or he may have employed Hugh May, who certainly became involved in the construction after the house was sold in an incomplete state in 1667 to Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Burlington, from whom it derives its name. Burlington had the house completed.

Albany (London)
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, W1J 0DS

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

Albany (London)
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Albany Courtyard, Piccadilly
London, W1J 0DS

The Albany, or simply Albany, is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, London.BuildingThe Albany was built in 1770–74 by Sir William Chambers for the newly created 1st Viscount Melbourne as Melbourne House. It is a three-storey mansion, seven bays (windows) wide, with a pair of service wings flanking a front courtyard. In 1791, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany abandoned Dover House, Whitehall (now a government office), and took up residence. In 1802 the Duke in turn gave up the house and it was converted by Henry Holland into 69 bachelor apartments (known as "sets"). This was achieved by subdividing the main block and its two service wings, and by adding two new parallel long buildings covering most of the garden, running as far as a new rear gate building on Burlington Gardens. Holland's new buildings of 1802-3 flank a covered walkway supported on thin iron columns and with an upswept roof. The blocks are white painted render in a simpler Regency style than Chambers' work. Most sets are accessed off common staircases without doors, like Oxbridge colleges and the Inns of Court.HistorySince its conversion, the Albany has been a prestigious set of bachelor apartments in London. The residents have included such famous names as the poet Lord Byron and the future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, and numerous members of the aristocracy.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley Street, Mayfair
London, W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Grosvenor Chapel
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
24 South Audley Street, Mayfair
London, W1K 2

020 7499 1684

Grosvenor Chapel is an Anglican church in what is now the City of Westminster, in England, built in 1730s. It inspired many churches in New England. It is situated on South Audley Street in Mayfair.HistoryThe foundation stone of the Grosvenor Chapel was laid on 7 April 1730 by Sir Richard Grosvenor, 4th Baronet, owner of the surrounding property, who had leased the site for 99 years at a peppercorn rent to a syndicate of four “undertakers” led by Benjamin Timbrell, a prosperous local builder.The new building was completed and ready to use by April 1731.Soon after the original 99-year lease ran out in 1829 the chapel was brought within the parochial system as a chapel of ease to St George's, Hanover Square.The chapel has been the spiritual home to a number of famous people including John Wilkes, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington, and his wife (parents to the Duke of Wellington), Florence Nightingale, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bishop Charles Gore.During the Second World War men and women of the American armed forces were welcomed to the chapel for their Sunday services, as recorded on a tablet outside the west wall, and after the war the congregation regularly included such people as the writer Rose Macaulay and Sir John Betjeman, Poet Laureate from 1972 until his death in 1984.

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, W1J 0BD

02073008000

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount Street
London, W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
114 Mount Street
London, W1K 3

02074937811

The Church of the Immaculate Conception, Farm Street, also known as Farm Street Church, is a Roman Catholic parish church run by the Society of Jesus in Mayfair, central London. Its main entrance is in Farm Street, though it can also be accessed from the adjacent Mount Street Gardens. Sir Simon Jenkins, in his book England's Thousand Best Churches, describes the church as "Gothic Revival at its most sumptuous".

Landmark Near 221B Baker Street

St George's Fields, Westminster
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
1 St. Georges Fields
London, United Kingdom W2 2

St George's Fields are a former burial ground of St George's, Hanover Square, lying between Connaught Street and Bayswater Road de-consecrated and sold off by the Church Commissioners in the 1970s to be built upon by The Utopian Housing Association, a housing trust.The architects, Design 5, used a ziggurat style of building (similar to the Brunswick by Patrick Hodgkinson), retaining much of the open space whilst creating 300 dwellings. Parts of the double walls surrounding the burial ground - reputedly designed to frustrate grave robbers - have been preserved along with a number of tombstones.The burial ground was also used for years as an archery ground, hence the nearby Archery Close and one of the new buildings being called Archery Steps.The estate is now in private ownership although the grounds of St George's Fields are opened to the public once a year under the London Garden Square Scheme when one of London's oldest plane trees, with a girth of over 18ft, may be seen set amongst the other trees.Although the buildings on the estate are not listed they have been included within the Bayswater Road Conservation Area established by the City of Westminster to preserve the amenities of this historic area.Within ten minutes walk is London Paddington station The nearest London Underground stations are Marble Arch Lancaster Gate on the Central line and the edgware road station.

Oxford Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
City of Westminster, West End
London, United Kingdom W1K 1NA

Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis.The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch.

Chiltern Firehouse
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
1 Chiltern Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 7

020 7073 7676

The Chiltern Firehouse is a restaurant and hotel located at 1 Chiltern Street, Marylebone, London, England occupying the Grade II listed building of the former Marylebone Fire Station, also known as Manchester Square Fire Station. It is owned by André Balazs, a hotel chain owner, who also owns the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, California and The Mercer Hotel in New York City. The head chef is Nuno Mendes.Manchester Square Fire StationThe Manchester Square Fire Station was built in 1889, by the London County Council Architect's Department, "in the Vulliamy manner". "Red brick with stone dressings; tiled roof. Free Tudor-Gothic style". It initially served as a fire station, and was one of the first fire stations in London. The original architect was Robert Pearsall. Originally known as Manchester Square Fire Station (Manchester Square is nearby), it was decommissioned in June 2005 by the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. For some years subsequently, it had been in occasional use as an exhibition space for local artists, as there was a long and complex planning process to convert it to a luxury hotel and restaurant. David Archer of Archer Humphryes Architects acted as lead architect for the project.

Embassy of Sweden, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11 Montagu Place
London, United Kingdom W1H 2

+44 20 7917 6400

The Embassy of Sweden in London is the diplomatic mission of Sweden in the United Kingdom. It is located by Montagu Square in Marylebone, just down the road from the embassy of Switzerland, and has housed the Swedish embassy since 1983.The Swedish ambassador's residence is located is a separate building at 27 Portland Place. Sweden also maintains a Trade Council at 259-269 Old Marylebone Road, Marylebone.

Marylebone Gardens
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
35 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom w1u 4qa

Marylebone or Marybone Gardens was a London pleasure garden sited in the grounds of the old manor house of Marylebone and frequented from the mid-17th century, when Marylebone was a village separated from London by fields and market gardens, to the third quarter of the 18th century.Early historyIt was situated in the area which is now between Marylebone Road, Marylebone High Street, Weymouth Street, and Harley Street; its site was developed as Beaumont Street and part of Devonshire Street.Originally consisting of two bowling greens adjoining the Rose of Normandy tavern on the east side of Marylebone High Street, its size was increased to about eight acres by acquisition of land from Marylebone Manor House, which had been converted into a hunting lodge by Henry VIII and was later used as a boarding school, eventually being demolished in 1791. The Marylebone Gardens, surrounded by a high brick wall and set about with fruit trees, had a carriage entrance in the High Street of Marylebone village and another entrance from the fields at the back. Its center was an open oval bowling green encompassed by a wide gravelled walk and many smaller walks and greens surrounded by clipped quickset hedges, "kept in good order, and indented like town walls."

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Ze Wunderhouse
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
22 Broadley St
London, United Kingdom NW8 8AE

London Central Mosque
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Regents Lodge, 146 Park Rd, London NW8 7RG
London, United Kingdom NW8 7

020 7724 3363

The London Central Mosque is a mosque located near Regent's Park in London, United Kingdom. It was designed by Sir Frederick Gibberd, completed in 1978, and has a prominent golden dome. The main hall can accommodate over 5,000 worshippers, with women praying on a balcony overlooking the hall. The mosque holds a chandelier and a vast carpet, with very little furniture.The inside of the dome is decorated with broken shapes in the Islamic tradition. There is also a small bookshop and halal café on the premises. The mosque is joined to the Islamic Cultural Centre which was officially opened by King George VI in 1944. The land was donated by George VI to the Muslim community of Britain in return for the donation of land in Cairo by King Farouk of Egypt and Sudan on which to build an Anglican cathedral.History1900 - 1931 Several efforts were made to build a mosque in London, including one, initiated by Lord Headley, a convert to Islam.1937 This project (Nizamia Mosque, later changed to present name) was funded by the Nizam of Hyderabad and the foundation stone of the mosque was laid on Friday, 4 June 1937, by HH Prince Azam Jah eldest son of Mir Osman Ali Khan the last ruler of Hyderabad State.