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Bedford Towers, Brighton | Tourist Information


137 Kings Road
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2JG


Landmark Near Bedford Towers

End Of Brighton Pier
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Madeira Drive
Brighton, BN2 1

01273 609361

Dorset Gardens Methodist Church
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Dorset Gardens Methodist Church
Brighton, BN2 1GS

01273 605502

The Dorset Gardens Methodist Church is a Methodist church in the Kemptown area of the city of Brighton and Hove, England. Although it is a modern building—completed in 2003—it is the third Methodist place of worship on the site: it replaced an older, larger church which was in turn a rebuilding of Brighton's first Methodist church. Between them, the churches have played an important part in the history of Methodism in Brighton.HistoryOn 26 August 1808, Brighton's first Methodist church opened on the west side of Dorset Gardens, a street running northwards from St James's Street—a main route eastwards out of Brighton. The opposite side of Dorset Gardens had been developed with large houses in the 1790s. The church, which followed the Wesleyan Methodist doctrine, was built in red brick with rounded windows and a square entrance porch, Three of the four interior sides of the square building were galleried, and the church's choir occupied one section. In about 1840, a hall, gas lighting, new entrance (leading on to Dorset Gardens itself) and organ were added. The Minister at the time (1855) did not want the church to have an organ, however, and was not present at the dedication ceremony.Another red-brick building, somewhat larger and with an Italianate tower, was designed and constructed by Liverpool-based architect C. O. Ellison in 1884, with a new organ and electric lighting added in 1894. The brick was set off by terracotta dressings at regular intervals, and the overall style appears to have been influenced by Renaissance architecture. A large extension was built on the south side in 1929, and it is this part of the site upon which the present church stands. This was opened in April 2003, three years after the 1884 building was demolished, and cost £1.6 million.

Brighton Friends Meeting House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Ship Street
Brighton, BN1 1

01273 770258

The Brighton Friends Meeting House is a Friends meeting house (Quaker place of worship) in the centre of Brighton, part of the city of Brighton and Hove in East Sussex, England. The building, which dates from 1805, replaced an earlier meeting house of 1690 what was then a small fishing village on the Sussex coast. Located at the junction of Ship Street and Prince Albert Street in The Lanes, the heart of Brighton's "old town" area, its architectural and historic importance has been recognised by English Heritage's granting of Grade II listed status.HistoryThe Quaker community in Brighton had been prevented from congregating in public by the 1664 Conventicle Act, but some freedom was granted after the Act of Toleration 1689 was passed under William and Mary's joint sovereignty. By 1690, the community acquired a former malthouse and some adjoining land, which became their first permanent meeting house and a burial ground respectively. This stood near the junction of North Street and New Road, where the Pavilion Theatre now stands. When some pleasure gardens were laid out next to the meeting house in the 1790s, the community sold its grounds (known as Quaker's Croft and extending to 1acre) to the Prince Regent, and sold the building separately; it was immediately demolished by its new owner. They used the £1,800 funds to buy a plot of land east of Ship Street for £1,000 and build a new meeting house, accessed by a narrow passageway next to two cottages which came with the land. It had an attached caretaker's cottage, and opened for worship in 1805. A large extension was added to the north in 1850; and in 1876, another extension was built to house educational facilities. This is now used for various cultural activities as well.

St Paul's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
West Street
Brighton, BN1 2RS

+44 1273 203231

St Paul's Church, dedicated to the missionary and Apostle to the Gentiles Paul of Tarsus, is a Church of England parish church in Brighton in the English county of Sussex. It is located on West Street in the city centre, close to the seafront and the main shopping areas.History and constructionThe church was the fourth to have been built on the instruction of Rev. Henry Michell Wagner, Vicar of Brighton since 1824. His first was All Souls on Eastern Road, built between 1833 and 1834 but demolished in 1968. This was followed by Christ Church on Montpelier Road in Montpelier, near the boundary with Hove, to which King William IV, his Queen Consort Adelaide and his successor Queen Victoria had each contributed £50 towards the £4,500 cost of construction. This church was demolished in 1982. His third was the church of St John the Evangelist in Carlton Hill, on the edge of the Kemptown district. This church, which had again received a £50 donation from Queen Victoria, was consecrated in 1840, and became the Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity after it closed in 1980. St. Paul's is therefore the earliest of Rev. Wagner's churches to remain in use as a place of Anglican worship.

St Paul's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
West Street
Brighton, BN1 2RS

+44 1273 203231

St Paul's Church, dedicated to the missionary and Apostle to the Gentiles Paul of Tarsus, is a Church of England parish church in Brighton in the English county of Sussex. It is located on West Street in the city centre, close to the seafront and the main shopping areas.History and constructionThe church was the fourth to have been built on the instruction of Rev. Henry Michell Wagner, Vicar of Brighton since 1824. His first was All Souls on Eastern Road, built between 1833 and 1834 but demolished in 1968. This was followed by Christ Church on Montpelier Road in Montpelier, near the boundary with Hove, to which King William IV, his Queen Consort Adelaide and his successor Queen Victoria had each contributed £50 towards the £4,500 cost of construction. This church was demolished in 1982. His third was the church of St John the Evangelist in Carlton Hill, on the edge of the Kemptown district. This church, which had again received a £50 donation from Queen Victoria, was consecrated in 1840, and became the Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity after it closed in 1980. St. Paul's is therefore the earliest of Rev. Wagner's churches to remain in use as a place of Anglican worship.

Sussex Heights
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
St. Margaret's Place
Brighton, BN1 2

01273 205179

Sussex Heights is a residential tower block in the centre of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Built between 1966 and 1968 on the site of a historic church, it rises to 334ft— as of March 2013 Sussex Heights is the 48th tallest building in the UK. Until 2005 it was the tallest residential tower in the UK outside London. Richard Seifert's design has been criticised for its overbearing scale and contrast with neighbouring Regency architecture, but it is acknowledged as an "imposing and prestigious" luxury apartment block with good facilities. Peregrine falcons have been resident at the top of the tower for several years, and have successfully bred. Until 2015, it was the tallest structure in Brighton, however it has now been exceeded by the i360 Tower, which stands 162 metres.HistoryCharles Busby was part of an architectural partnership (with Amon Wilds and his son Amon Henry Wilds) which gave Brighton much of its character in the 19th century. They met high demand for residential, ecclesiastical and public buildings of all types in the rich, fashionable town by producing elegant designs which combined contemporary architectural expectations with imaginative devices (such as prominent cornices, bold bay windows and columns with decorative capitals) in a distinctively "powerful and assertive" style. Busby has been described as the best architect of the three, having already achieved much by the age of 20. He moved to Brighton in 1822 and joined Amon and Amon Henry Wilds.

Chapel Royal, Brighton
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
164 North St
Brighton, BN1 1EA

01273 328767

The Chapel Royal is an 18th-century place of worship in the centre of Brighton, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Built as a chapel of ease, it became one of Brighton's most important churches, gaining its own parish and becoming closely associated with the Prince Regent and fashionable Regency-era society. It remains an active church.HistoryIn the 18th century, Brighton was a small town based on a declining fishing industry and still suffering the effects of damage caused by the Great Storm of 1703. Its population in the middle of the century was approximately 2,000. Its fortunes improved after a doctor from nearby Lewes, Richard Russell, wrote a treatise encouraging the use of seawater as a cure for illness, in particular glandular swellings. He recommended bathing in the sea and drinking the water at Brighton. This form of medical therapy became popular, and helped make the town a fashionable place to visit. Brighton became increasingly popular throughout the rest of the century, but received its next significant boost when the Prince Regent, son of King George III, made his first visit in 1783. By 1786 he had a home in the town—a rented farmhouse near the Old Steine, inland from the coast—and he later commissioned the architect John Nash to build a palace, the Royal Pavilion, for him on the site. The Prince was an infrequent churchgoer, and Brighton's only Anglican church, St Nicholas, was a long way from his home and up a steep hill. Furthermore, the ever-increasing number of visitors and residents caused overcrowding in the church. In 1789 the new Vicar of Brighton, Revd Thomas Hudson, decided to resolve these problems by building a new chapel near the Prince's house. He hoped to encourage the Prince to attend, and thereby worship more often than he had in the past, and considered that a more central chapel would relieve the pressure on the parish church.

St Andrew's Church, Waterloo Street, Hove
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo Street
Brighton, BN3 1AQ

01223 324442

St Andrew's Church is a former Anglican church in the Brunswick Town area of Hove, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Although declared redundant in 1990, it was one of the area's most fashionable places of worship in the 19th century, when it was built to serve the wealthy residents of the Brunswick estate and surrounding areas. It is listed at Grade I, a designation used for buildings "of outstanding architectural or historic interest".HistoryThe area between Brighton, to the east, and the ancient centre of Hove, to the west, was farmland until the 1820s, when Brunswick Town was developed in response to the success of the Kemp Town estate in Brighton—a planned estate of high-class houses, servants' quarters and other buildings, all in the Regency style. Architect Charles Busby planned and built the Brunswick Town estate, which (together with other nearby residential development) helped the population of Hove to rise from 100 in 1801 to 2,500 in 1841.The only church nearby was St Andrew's, the ancient parish church; this was some distance away and had fallen into near-dereliction. The curate of the (now demolished) St Margaret's Church in Cannon Place, Brighton, Rev. Edward Everard, owned some land near the former Wick Farm, on which the Brunswick Town estate had been built. He was aware that there was no plan to build a church in the estate, so he decided to build a proprietary chapel on his land. Rev. Everard knew Charles Busby, but they had fallen out after a disagreement in 1824 over the commission for the Sussex County Hospital (now the Royal Sussex County Hospital) in Brighton: Everard was overruled by other members of the planning committee and had to break his promise that Busby would be allowed to design it. Therefore, Everard looked for a different architect to design and build the church, and Charles Barry—who had already built the hospital and St Peter's Church in Brighton—was chosen. The church has a blue plaque commemorating Barry.

St Andrew's Church, Waterloo Street, Hove
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Waterloo Street
Brighton, BN3 1AQ

01223 324442

St Andrew's Church is a former Anglican church in the Brunswick Town area of Hove, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. Although declared redundant in 1990, it was one of the area's most fashionable places of worship in the 19th century, when it was built to serve the wealthy residents of the Brunswick estate and surrounding areas. It is listed at Grade I, a designation used for buildings "of outstanding architectural or historic interest".HistoryThe area between Brighton, to the east, and the ancient centre of Hove, to the west, was farmland until the 1820s, when Brunswick Town was developed in response to the success of the Kemp Town estate in Brighton—a planned estate of high-class houses, servants' quarters and other buildings, all in the Regency style. Architect Charles Busby planned and built the Brunswick Town estate, which (together with other nearby residential development) helped the population of Hove to rise from 100 in 1801 to 2,500 in 1841.The only church nearby was St Andrew's, the ancient parish church; this was some distance away and had fallen into near-dereliction. The curate of the (now demolished) St Margaret's Church in Cannon Place, Brighton, Rev. Edward Everard, owned some land near the former Wick Farm, on which the Brunswick Town estate had been built. He was aware that there was no plan to build a church in the estate, so he decided to build a proprietary chapel on his land. Rev. Everard knew Charles Busby, but they had fallen out after a disagreement in 1824 over the commission for the Sussex County Hospital (now the Royal Sussex County Hospital) in Brighton: Everard was overruled by other members of the planning committee and had to break his promise that Busby would be allowed to design it. Therefore, Everard looked for a different architect to design and build the church, and Charles Barry—who had already built the hospital and St Peter's Church in Brighton—was chosen. The church has a blue plaque commemorating Barry.

Brighton Dome
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Church Street
Brighton, BN1 1UD

01273 709709

Brighton Unitarian Church
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
New Road
Brighton, BN1 1UF

01273 696022

The Brighton Unitarian Church, previously known as Christ Church, is a Unitarian chapel in Brighton, England. Built in 1820 by prolific local architect Amon Henry Wilds on land sold to the fledgling Unitarian community by the Prince Regent, the stuccoed Greek Revival building occupies a prominent position near the corner of Church Road and New Road in the centre of Brighton, near the Royal Pavilion and the city's main theatres. It has had Grade II listed status since 1952. It is a member of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, the umbrella organisation for British Unitarians.HistoryBrighton in the late eighteenth century was turning from a fishing village to a fashionable resort, largely because of the patronage of the Prince Regent. New Road, as it is now known, was built on his instructions. The main north-south road leading out of the old town ran next to the Royal Pavilion, where he lived; noise and traffic disturbed him and made access to his stables difficult. He asked the architect of his stables to build a new road further to the west, and closed the original route. New Road was pedestrianised in 2007.A congregation of Baptists with Calvinist views had been established in Brighton since the 18th century. A rift developed from 1791, when William Stevens, a newcomer, introduced Universalist views. In 1793 or 1795, Stevens and 18 others (including the original pastor) were expelled. From 1797, a small but steadily growing congregation met at Stevens' house; by 1806 they had moved to a small chapel in Jew Street, near the Baptists' meeting place in Bond Street. A Unitarian missionary popularised the theology among the congregation, and assistance from the leader of the Unitarian community in nearby Ditchling, John Chatfield, enabled a meeting room to be bought. This opened in 1812.

St Nicholas' Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Dyke Road
Brighton, BN1 3

07746 198026

The Church of Saint Nicholas of Myra, usually known as St. Nicholas Church, is an Anglican church in Brighton, England. It is both the original parish church of Brighton and the oldest surviving building in Brighton. It is located on high ground at the junction of Church Street and Dyke Road in the city centre, very close to the main shopping areas. Due to its architectural significance the church is a Grade II* listed building.Early historyThe Domesday Book of 1086 records the presence of a church, valued at £12, in what was then the small fishing village of Bristelmestune. Shortly afterwards, it was granted to the Cluniac priory in nearby Lewes. Although there is no certainty over where this church was located, it is possible that it stood on the site of the present-day St. Nicholas church: although Bristelmestune was located some distance to the south immediately adjacent to the coast, the ground there was marshy and suffered from erosion, and was vulnerable to attacks from invaders. The higher ground of the hill where the present church stands would have been better strategically and defensively, as well as being highly visible to residents of the village and the fishermen at sea.Construction of the present churchIn its current form, St. Nicholas church dates from the mid-14th century, although the tower that was built at that time used some stones of Norman origin, which may have come from the original church. Also, a font from that period is preserved within the church. It was carved in around 1170 in Caen Stone, and in 2001 was relocated to a prominent position at the west end of the church - the latest of several moves over the centuries.

Palmeira Square
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
11 St Johns Rd
Hove, bn32j

Palmeira Square is a mid-19th-century residential development in Hove, part of the English city and seaside resort of Brighton and Hove. At the southern end it adjoins Adelaide Crescent, another architectural set-piece which leads down to the seafront; large terraced houses occupy its west and east sides, separated by a public garden; and at the north end is one of Hove's main road junctions. This is also called Palmeira Square, and its north side is lined with late 19th-century terraced mansions. Commercial buildings and a church also stand on the main road, which is served by many buses (some of which terminate there).The land was originally occupied by "the world's largest conservatory", the Anthaeum—a visitor attraction planned by botanist, author and building promoter Henry Phillips. The giant dome's collapse and total destruction on the day it was due to open in 1833 made Phillips go blind from shock, and the debris occupied the site for many years. Work began in the early 1850s and was largely complete in the mid-1860s, although commercial and residential buildings such as Palmeira House and Gwydyr Mansions continued to be added at the northern end throughout the late 19th century. English Heritage has listed the residential buildings on the western, eastern and northern sides of the square at Grade II for their architectural and historical importance, although one building has the higher Grade II* status because of its opulent custom-designed interior.

St Michael's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Road
Brighton, BN1 3FU

01273822284

St. Michael's Church (in full, St. Michael and All Angels) is an Anglican church in Brighton, England, dating from the mid-Victorian era. Located on Victoria Road in the Montpelier area, to the east of Montpelier Road, it is one of the largest churches in the city of Brighton and Hove. The church is a Grade I listed building.Origins and the local areaThe church serves the loosely defined Montpelier and Clifton Hill areas of Brighton, which lie west of the major Dyke Road and cover the steep slopes between the Seven Dials district and the seafront. St Stephen's Church had served parts of the district since 1851, when it had been moved to Montpelier Place from its previous location in Castle Square, close to the Royal Pavilion. However, it was not convenient for the area as a whole, with most of its parishioners being drawn instead from the streets to the south of the church.Development of the Montpelier and Clifton Hill areas started in the 1820s, and by the 1840s they had essentially taken the form they remain in today, with a range of high-quality houses, many in the form of Regency terraces and crescents such as Clifton Terrace. However, one area of open land remained: at the time (the 1850s) it was known as Temple Fields, and consisted of a field, a pond and a partly built house. This was chosen as the site for a new church to serve the area. On present-day maps, Temple Fields is the area bounded by Denmark Terrace, Clifton Hill, Powis Road and Victoria Road. The church faces three streets: St. Michael's Place, Powis Road and Victoria Road (on which the main entrance is located).

St Peter's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
York Place
Brighton, BN1 4GU

01273 676051

St Peter's Church is a church in Brighton in the English city of Brighton and Hove. It is near the centre of the town, on an island between two major roads, the A23 London Road and A270 Lewes Road. Built from 1824–28 to a design by Sir Charles Barry, it is arguably the finest example of the pre-Victorian Gothic Revival style. It is a Grade II* listed building. It was the parish church of Brighton from 1873 to 2007 and is sometimes unofficially referred to as "Brighton's cathedral".History of the buildingSt Peter's Church was founded as a chapel of ease associated with Brighton's oldest church and its existing parish church, St Nicholas'. The contract to design the new church was won in open competition by Charles Barry, then only in his mid-twenties. It was built in an approximation of the 14th- and 15th-century Perpendicular or Late Gothic style, typical of the so-called Commissioners' churches, of which St Peter's was one. It was not a revival of its style in the manner of Barry's pupil Augustus Pugin, but, as Nikolaus Pevsner described it, " remedies this fault by remarkable inventiveness and boldness".

The Love Sex and Intimacy Fair
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
The Hove Centre, Norton Road
Hove, BN3 4AH

07764 300174

We will have numerous talks and workshops exploring a variety of fascinating aspects of sexuality, love, intimacy in a safe environment of acceptance and tolerance. Subjects include: Internet Dating, Exploring intimacy, intimacy workshops for couples, sensual massage, Tantra, Sexuality (labels or variations of normal), Burlesque, The female orgasm, Male sexuality, Sexual health. There will also be an exhibition with stands from many different suppliers and services relating to sex, intimacy and relationships.

Hobgoblin Brighton
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
31 York Place
Brighton, BN1 4GU

01273 682933

Montpelier Cresent
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
20 Montpelier Crescent
Brighton, BN1 3JF

Church of the Sacred Heart, Hove
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
39 Norton Road
Hove, BN3 3BF

01273 732843

The Church of the Sacred Heart is a Roman Catholic church in Hove, part of the English city of Brighton and Hove. It is the oldest of Hove's three Roman Catholic churches, and one of eleven in the city area. It has been designated a Grade II Listed building.HistoryRoman Catholic worship was prohibited in Britain between the time of the English Reformation and the late 18th century. At that time, some Acts of Parliament were passed to remove some of the restrictions. The Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 allowed Roman Catholic churches to be built for the first time. In Hove's neighbour, Brighton, a community quickly established itself and built a permanent church, St John the Baptist's, in 1835. Hove's community took longer to become established; by the 1830s they were meeting secretly in a chapel established in a private house, but there had been no thought of building a permanent church. The first plans were made in the 1870s, when the former priest in charge of St Mary Magdalen's Church in Brighton, Fr George Oldham, left money in his will for the establishment of a mission church. He died in 1875, and the decision to establish Hove's first church was made the following year. Finding a site was troublesome: the original choice, on Tisbury Road, was abandoned in favour of one opposite Hove Town Hall, which the Church authorities bought for £3,746. Although an architect—John Crawley, a London-based ecclesiastical designer who had built several churches in Sussex and Hampshire—had been selected, not enough money was available to execute his proposed design immediately; and during the delay, the West Brighton Estate Company (which owned the surrounding land and the houses on it) complained about the supposed negative effect a Roman Catholic church would have on house prices. The Company bought the land back from the Church and agreed to help them find a new site; after Denmark Villas in the far northeast of Hove was considered and rejected, land on the west side of Norton Road was selected in October 1879. John Crawley's plans were approved a year later, and building work started on 3 November 1880 with the laying of the foundation stone.

St Bartholomew's Church, Brighton
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Ann Street
Brighton, BN1 4

01273 620491

St Bartholomew's Church, dedicated to the apostle Bartholomew, is an Anglican church in Brighton, England. The neo-gothic building is located on Ann Street, on a sloping site between Brighton railway station and the A23 London Road, adjacent to the New England Quarter development. It is notable for its height - dominating the streets around it and being visible from many parts of the city - and its distinctive red-brick construction.History and constructionThe Revd Henry Michell Wagner, who had occupied the position of Vicar of Brighton since 1824, died in 1870, giving his son, the Revd Arthur Douglas Wagner (the curate of St Paul's Church in West Street), the opportunity to continue and improve his father's proposals for new parish churches in Brighton. He undertook three such schemes in the 1870s, two in conjunction with his two half-brothers, but Saint Bartholomew's is the only church which was his sole responsibility throughout.In 1868, Arthur Wagner had built a temporary church on Providence Place, a back street parallel with the main London Road, along with a school accommodating 400 pupils. After his father's death, he resolved to build a more impressive new church in the same area. The original plan, which was submitted to the Town Council in 1871 and approved on 7 June of that year, consisted of a combined church and school building, 322 feet in length, 46 feet wide, and 41¾ feet high. This was amended shortly afterwards to reduce the number of bays in the interior from 13 to 11½; the additional space formed a "courtyard" area between the church and the existing school building, which was to be retained.

St. Bartholomew's
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Ann Street
Brighton, BN1 4GP

01273 620491

Duke of York's Picture House, Brighton
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Preston Circus
Brighton, BN1 4NA

0871 902 5728

The Duke of York's Picture House is an art house cinema in Brighton, England, which lays claim to being the oldest cinema in continuous use in Britain. According to cinema historian Allen Eyles, the cinema "deserves to be named Britain's oldest cinema". In 2012 it was voted best Cinema in the UK.The Duke of York's cinema was built at the cost of £3000 by actress-manager Violet Melnotte-Wyatt. It opened on 22 September 1910 and was one of Brighton's first picture palaces and also one of the first cinemas in the world. It was built on the site of the Amber Ale Brewery, the walls of which still form the rear part of the auditorium. The architects were Clayton & Black. The building remains largely unaltered, it even retains one of its boxes in the balcony area. The original colour scheme was red and cream.The Duke of York's was always a quality cinema for the more discerning patron, its marketing tag-line for many years was "Bring her to the Duke's, it is fit for a Duchess." The name came from the West End theatre which its first proprietor Mrs Melnotte-Wyatt was also associated with. Being slightly outside the town centre, the Duke's catered for its local audience and this has been its saving grace. While other cinemas in Brighton came and went, The Duke of York's has remained in continuous operation.The cinema has operated as an arts cinema since 1981 and has passed through several owners and hosted illegal punk rock concerts. The cinema was in a shabby state when it was purchased in 1994 by Picturehouse Cinemas who have invested in the building and returned it to its former glory.

Ralli Hall
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
81 Denmark Villas
Hove, BN3 3TH

01273 202254

Ralli Hall
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
81 Denmark Villas
Hove, BN3 3TH

01273 202254

Ralli Hall is a community centre, events venue, theatre stage, business hub and impressive main hall in Hove, part of the English coastal city of Brighton and Hove. Built in 1913 as a memorial to Stephen Ralli, a member of a wealthy Greek family who had donated money to many causes throughout Brighton and Hove, it was used for about 60 years as a church hall linked to Hove's parish church. The Brighton & Hove Jewish community subsequently bought it, and in 1976 it came back into use as a community and social centre for Jewish and other groups. The Wrenaissance-style brick structure occupies a prominent corner site in a conservation area and provides a visual contrast to the older villas around it. English Heritage has listed the building at Grade II for its architectural and historical importance.HistoryThe Ralli family, the first members of which moved to England in the 1820s from Chios in Greece, established a successful trading empire in London in the 19th century. Their business focused on grain and shipping, and by 1873 the five pioneering brothers and six other relatives had a listing on the Baltic Exchange. Stephen Augustus Ralli, son of Augustus Ralli, made his fortune in grain and owned houses in London and the seaside resort of Hove: he lived at St Catherine's Lodge on Kingsway from 1894 until his death in 1902.

Ralli Hall
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
81 Denmark Villas
Hove, BN3 3TH

01273 202254

Ralli Hall is a community centre, events venue, theatre stage, business hub and impressive main hall in Hove, part of the English coastal city of Brighton and Hove. Built in 1913 as a memorial to Stephen Ralli, a member of a wealthy Greek family who had donated money to many causes throughout Brighton and Hove, it was used for about 60 years as a church hall linked to Hove's parish church. The Brighton & Hove Jewish community subsequently bought it, and in 1976 it came back into use as a community and social centre for Jewish and other groups. The Wrenaissance-style brick structure occupies a prominent corner site in a conservation area and provides a visual contrast to the older villas around it. English Heritage has listed the building at Grade II for its architectural and historical importance.HistoryThe Ralli family, the first members of which moved to England in the 1820s from Chios in Greece, established a successful trading empire in London in the 19th century. Their business focused on grain and shipping, and by 1873 the five pioneering brothers and six other relatives had a listing on the Baltic Exchange. Stephen Augustus Ralli, son of Augustus Ralli, made his fortune in grain and owned houses in London and the seaside resort of Hove: he lived at St Catherine's Lodge on Kingsway from 1894 until his death in 1902.

Local Business Near Bedford Towers

Coalition
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
171-181 Kings Rd Arches
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

01273 722385

Coalition is Brighton's best loved venue. Situated on the seafront we offer upfront club nights at the weekend, the most exciting mid week student nights and a massive live music programme to boast about. We also have a huge terrace for sun-drenched days serving a range delicious hot food, Barista Coffee & Cocktails. If you haven't already visited Coalition for our late night offerings, then here's just a taste of what you missed this year... Lianne La Havas, Ghostpoet, Modestep, Doorly, Scoobius Pip, The Rapture, Submotion Orchestra, Aluna George, The Glitch Mob, WU Lyf, Wiley, Yasmin, Diplo, Dillon Francis, Jessie J, Four Tet, Arrested Development, Best Coast, Alice Russell, Shabazz Palaces, Marques Toliver, Natty, Koreless, The Milk, Slow Club, Hadouken, Great Escape Festival, Caribou, Kito, High Rankin, Tempah T, Ratatat, Herman Dune, Theme Park, EZ, Rudimental, Darren Emerson, Vivian Girls, Matt Berry, The Vaselines, We Are Scientists, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, Ms Dynamite, Skrillex, Toro Y Moi, Steve-O, Yuksek, Major Look, Carte Blanche: Medhi and Riton, Craig Finn, Jungle Brothers, Bonobo, Ash, Talvin Singh, Carl Barat, Just Blaze & Alchemist... http://drinkinbrighton.co.uk/coalition Twitter: @coalition_btn Instagram: @coalition_btn Blog: http://brightoncoalition.wordpress.com/

Fortune of war
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
156-157 Kings Road Arches Brighton, East Sussex
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1NB

01273 205065

Bistro du Vin
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
2 Ship Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

1273-718588

The Globe
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
78 Middle Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1AL

01273770685

Comfy armchairs, a Punkah fan, a copper panelled ceiling and rustic tables coupled with the deep red and dark wood colouring make up the decor. There is also a basement bar seating area that plays home to a library, snaking rope lights and modern art on the walls.

Little Bay Opera Restaurant Brighton
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
60-64 Kings Road
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

01273 731330

Bar De La Mer
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
124 Kings Road
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2

01273 739046

Gemini
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
白鳥町
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2FN

01273 327888

Saturday Take-Down at WAHOO
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
79-81 West Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2RA

01273719364

SATURDAY TAKE-DOWN is SATURDAYS leading party night out on West Street, Brighton. Cheapest Entry in town. Request Friendly DJ DAN V playing the best in: RnB, Chart Hits and Club Classics £2 Drinks Deals ALL NIGHT Free Shots on Entry!! STUDENT DISCOUNT!!!! Number 1 for STAG AND HEN PARTYS FANCY DRESS APPROVED!!!! Large Groups Welcome!! Discounted Entry on GUESTLIST

Coach House Bar and Restaurant
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
59 Middle Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1

01273 719000

The Loft
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
10 Ship Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1AZ

01273 328439

Located on Ship Street above Smugglers Bar, The Loft is a spacious 250 capacity venue. Available to hire for parties, functions and club nights it can cater for a wide range of events. Whether you are looking for somewhere to dance over the weekend or somewhere to host a party The Loft is the place for you.

ODEON
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
ODEON Brighton, Kingswest, West Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2RE

01273 329977

Brighton Centre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
King's Road
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2

01273 290131

Brighton Centre is a conference and exhibition centre located in Brighton, England. It is the largest of its kind in southern England, and is regularly used for conferences of the British political parties and other bodies of national importance. The venue has the capacity to accommodate up to 5,000 delegates, although rooms in the building can be used for weddings and banquets. It has also been used as a live music venue since it was opened by James Callaghan on 19 September 1977. It was designed in a Brutalist style by architects Russell Diplock & Associates, who made extensive use of textured concrete.The venue is situated in the centre of Brighton on the sea front and is within 200 metres of major hotels. In 2004, it was estimated that the centre generates £50 million in revenue for Brighton.The second phase of redevelopment was completed in January 2012; a refurbishment of its main entrance resulted in a transformation of its outside façade. In addition to this, the venue’s restaurant, which is regularly used as a relaxation space for larger conferences, now features floor-to-ceiling windows with uninterrupted views of the seafront and new interiors.As part of Brighton's "CIty Plan", it has been proposed that the building be knocked down to make way of an extension to the Churchill Square shopping centre.Notable eventsBing Crosby's final performance was at the Brighton Centre on 10 October 1977. He died of a heart attack four days later, while at a golf tournament in Spain.On 11 December 1982, The Jam played their last gig in the Conference Room at the Brighton Centre.

Brighton Media Centre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
15-17 Middle Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1AL

+44 (0) 1273 201 100

The Brighton Media Centre is a not-for-profit organisation. Our two buildings are maintained by our in-house maintenance team and staffed by our reception and management team, always on hand when you need us! * Friese-Greene, only a minute from the seafront and a 10 minute walk from the train station. Various exciting events are held here throughout the year. This venue incorporates two flexible performance spaces, exhibition space, a secret garden and a bar. Our flexible Spaces can be adapted to a number of different functions- trade shows, functions, performances, book launches, work shops, networking events, yoga lessons or art fairs and exhibitions. We seat up to 60 people for a performance and can hold more with standing room in these spaces. A stage and lighting can be provided upon request. There is wheelchair access, a lift and disabled toilets are available in our Friese-Greene House building. * Old Steyne House, at 21-22 old Steyne, is a bright and roomy period building a pebble’s throw from the beach and a ten minute stroll from Brighton Station. Excellent views over the Steine and its Victorian fountain. A great choice of suites and a meeting room make this a very popular choice for people looking to set up business in central Brighton. The BMC holds a full Alcohol & Performance Licence.

Sticky Mike's Frog Bar
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
9 Middle Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 1AL

Vodka Revs
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
77 West Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2RA

01273 806090

Travelodge Hotel - Brighton Seafront
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
West Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2RQ

0871 984 6405

Brighton Seafront Travelodge has everything you need for a good night's sleep, offering great value rooms close to the town's vibrant promenade, within easy walking distance of the rail station.

The Grand Hotel - Brighton, the Royal Suite
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
97-99 Kings Roafd
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2FW

Brighton Centre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
King's Road
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2GR

01273 290131

Nu Posto Brighton
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
14 West Street
Brighton, United Kingdom BN1 2RE

Ice Café
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
106-107 kings road arches
Brighton, United Kingdom bn1 2fn

Ice Café is one of the most welcoming places on the brighton shoreline wether you are looking for somewhere to have a family meal , just want to get out the cold for a cup of tea or your just looking for some good conversation we are always happy to help