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Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London | Tourist Information


Malet Place
London, United Kingdom WC1E 7

+44 (0) 20 7679 2884

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is part of University College London Museums & Collections. The museum contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material. It ranks behind only the collections of the Cairo Museum, The British Museum and the Ägyptisches Museum, Berlin in number and quality of items.HistoryThe museum was established as a teaching resource for the Department of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology at University College at the same time as the department was established in 1892. The initial collection was donated by the writer Amelia Edwards. The first Edwards Professor, William Matthew Flinders Petrie conducted many important excavations, and in 1913 he sold his collections of Egyptian antiquities to University College, transforming the museum into one of the leading collections outside Egypt. Petrie excavated dozens of major sites in the course of his career, including the Roman Period cemeteries at Hawara, famous for the beautiful mummy portraits in classical Roman style; Amarna, the city of king Akhenaten, known as the first king to believe in one God; and the first true pyramid, at Meydum, where he uncovered some of the earliest evidence for mummification.The collection and library were arranged in galleries within the university and a guidebook published in 1915. Initially, the collection's visitors were students and academics; it was not then open to the general public. Petrie retired from UCL in 1933, though his successors continued to add to the collections, excavating in other parts of Egypt and the Sudan. During the Second World War (1939–1945) the collection was packed up and moved out of London for safekeeping. In the early 1950s it was moved into a former stable, where it remains adjacent to the science library of UCL.

Art Museum Near Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre
London, SE1 8XX

+44 (0)20 7960 4200

Opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 1968, it is an outstanding example of sixties brutalist architecture and is one of the few remaining buildings of this style. It was designed by a group of young architects, including Dennis Crompton, Warren Chalk and Ron Herron. The Hayward Gallery is named after the late Sir Isaac Hayward, the former leader of the London County Council.

National Gallery
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, WC2N 5DN

020 7747 2885

Exhibitions: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/ Events: http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on Our social media code of conduct: http://bit.ly/1IN7xJt

Royal Academy of Arts
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Burlington House, Piccadilly
London, W1J 0BD

02073008000

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 St Martin's Place
London, WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

Opera Lounge London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
22 Charing Cross Road
London, W1C 9EL

+447795651897

The Courtauld Gallery
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, WC2R 0RN

+44 (0)20 7848 2526

Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masteries such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Badaged Ear.'

London Film Museum Events
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
45 Wellington Street
London, WC2E 7

020 7202 7043

Our venue located in the Covent Garden Piazza has a modern elegant feel and is the perfect space, featuring 4 cellars steeped in history, originally used as the flower cellars for the Covent Gardent market. It features the fantastic Bond in Motion exhibition creating a talking point for any event. For more information about hiring any of our spaces please call 020 7202 7043.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Rose Issa Projects
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
82 Great Portland St
London, W1W 7NW

0207 243 3250

Rose Issa is a curator, writer and producer who has championed visual art and film from the Middle East for more than 30 years. She has lived in London since the 1980s showcasing upcoming and established artists, producing exhibitions with public and private institutions worldwide, and running a publishing programme. Through curating numerous exhibitions and film festivals, she introduced Western audiences to many artists who have since become stars of the international scene, including: Chant Avedissian, Ayman Baalbaki, Shadi Ghadirian, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Bahman Ghobadi, Hassan Hajjaj, Farhad Moshiri, Abbas Kiarostami, Rashid Koraichi and Nja Mahdaoui among many more. As well as holding exhibitions at her own project space in London, Rose Issa collaborates as a co-curator with private and public institutions such as the Beirut Exhibition Center (2010-11); the Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool (2010); Tate Britain, London (2008); the European Parliament, Brussels (2008); the State Museum of Oriental Art, Moscow (2007); the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (2007); ING Bank, Geneva (2007); the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2006); the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin (2004); The CCCB (Contemporary Cultural Centre), Barcelona (2003); the IFA - Institut fur Auslandsbezeihungen (2002-3), Stuttgart; the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam (1996-1997); the Barbican Art Centre, London (2001, 1995); and Leighton House Museum, London (ongoing, since 1992). She also advises and lends works to public and private institutions, including the CAB Art Centre, Brussels (2013); the Boghossian Foundation, Brussels (2012); the Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia (2009); Paul Klee Museum, Bern (2009); Belvedere Museum, Vienna (2009); The British Museum; the Imperial War Museum; The Museum of Mankind; the Victoria & Albert Museum; The Written Art Foundation, Wiesbaden; The National Museums of Scotland; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Smithsonian Institution (Sackler/Freer Gallery and National Museum of African Arts); the World Bank, Washington DC; and The National Gallery of Jordan. Rose Issa was a Jury member for the National Pavillions at the 50th Venice Biennale (2003) and sat on the Jury for the Arab British Centre (2013) and MOPCAP (the Magic of Persia, 2013). Publications Founder of the publishing unit Rose Issa Projects and Beyond Art Production, Rose publishes monographs and comprehensive catalogues addressing the current concerns and trends of the visual arts scene from the Arab world, Iran and Turkey. Recent titles include: Maliheh Afnan: Familiar Faces (2013); Nermine Hammam: Cairo Year One (2012); Raeda Saadeh: Reframing Palestine (2012), Farhad Ahrarnia: Canary in a Coal Mine (2011), Ayman Baalbaki: Beirut Again and Again (2011), Selma Gurbuz: Shadow of My Self (2011), Omid Salehi: a Photographer’s Journey Through Iran (2011), Fathi Hassan (2010); Parastou Forouhar: Art, Life and Death in Iran (2010) and Maliheh Afnan: Traces, Faces, Places (2009). Rose has also co-published the two major overviews on contemporary photography from the Middle East: Arab Photography Now (with Kehrer Verlag, 2011) and Iranian Photography Now (with Hatjie Kantz, 2008). Film from the Arab World and Iran In 1982 Rose Issa launched the first-ever Arab Film Festival in Paris and worked with the Delegations Etrangères at the Cannes Film Festival (1983-1985). For a further 26 years until 2008, she curated Arab and Iranian film seasons in Britain and abroad. She was special advisor to The Berlinale (2003-2007); the International Rotterdam Film Festival (1996-2002); the London International Film Festival (1987-2003); and The British Film Institute (1988-1995). She also curated Arab and Iranian film seasons at The National Film Theatre (“Hollywood on the Nile”, 2003; “Art and Life: The New Iranian Cinema”, 1999; “First Arab Film Festival”, 1987); the Barbican (“Unveiled Lives: Women and Iranian Cinema”, 2001; “Melodramas, Comedies, and Mysteries: North African Film”, 1995). In addition she curated a season of Iranian films for Britain’s Channel 4 (2005) and collaborated with them on “Cinema Iran”, a series of documentaries on Iranian cinema. She also realised the documentary, “Moving Pictures: Tunisian Women Film Directors”, for BBC2 TV (1995).

Brunei Gallery, SOAS
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
10, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London, WC1H 0XG

+44 (0)20 7898 4046

Running a programme of changing visiting exhibitions from Africa, Asia and the Middle East combined with the permanent rotating selection from SOAS's own collections on display in the Foyle Special Collections Gallery and with a Japanese influenced Roof Garden, The Brunei Gallery, SOAS makes a stimulating haven in the heart of London.

Gagosian Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
6-24 Britannia Street
London, WC1X 9JD

+44.20.7841.9960

Local Business Near Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

InterContinental London Park Lane
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7QY

+442074093131

Wellington Lounge
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
1 Hamilton Pl
London, United Kingdom W1J 7NS

020 7409 3131

The Wellington Lounge The Intercontinental Hotel
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
One Hamilton Place, Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1J 7QY

02074093131

City Cruises - London Eye To Greenwich
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Riverside Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

RAF Club, 128 Piccadilly
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
128 Piccadilly
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

Hard Rock Cafe London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
150 Old Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

20-76290382

Shell Centre
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
York Rd
London, United Kingdom SE1 7NA

The Shell Centre, in London, is one of the two central offices of oil major Shell (the other is in The Hague). It is located on Belvedere Road in the London Borough of Lambeth. It is a prominent feature on the South Bank of the River Thames near County Hall, and now forms the backdrop to the London Eye.The current Shell Centre comprises the tower building and three adjoining nine-storey wings (collectively formerly known as the "Upstream Building"). The original development also included a separate building known as the "Downstream Building", which was separated from the Upstream Building by the railway viaduct between Charing Cross and Waterloo East. The Downstream Building was disposed of by Shell in the 1990s and is now a block of residential apartments known as the White House, and has been heightened by a storey.Site history and layoutThe Shell Centre occupies part of the site cleared for the 1951 Festival of Britain. The areas closer to the River Thames now include Jubilee Gardens and the South Bank Centre. Jubilee Gardens remained undeveloped prior to its laying out as an open space, largely because of a restrictive covenant in favour of Shell that restricts any building on the part of the site directly between the Shell Tower and the River Thames. The naming of the Shell Centre buildings perpetuated the split of the Festival site into distinct Upstream and Downstream areas – separated by the railway viaduct approach to Hungerford Bridge.

Jubilee Gardens
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7

The Mall Royale
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom Sw1

David Chipperfield Architects
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
11 York Rd Building 11
London, United Kingdom SE1 7NX

020 7620 4800

Cookbook Cafe At The Intercontinental Hotel, Park Lane
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
PARK LANE
London, United Kingdom W1J 7

The Mall, London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1

The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east. Before it terminates at Whitehall it is met by Horse Guards Road and Spring Gardens where the Metropolitan Board of Works and London County Council were once based. It is closed to traffic on Sundays, public holidays and on ceremonial occasions.HistoryThe Mall began as a field for playing pall-mall. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was a fashionable promenade, bordered by trees.The Mall was envisioned as a ceremonial route in the early 20th century, matching the creation of similar ceremonial routes in other cities such as Berlin, Mexico City, Oslo, Paris, Saint Petersburg, Vienna and Washington, D.C. These routes were intended to be used for major national ceremonies. As part of the development – designed by Aston Webb – a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace, and the Victoria Memorial was erected.

Black & Blue
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
1-2 Rochester Walk, Borough Market
London, United Kingdom SE1 9AF

020 7357 9922

No.4 Hamilton Place
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
4 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7BQ

+44 (0)20 7670 4314

No.4 Hamilton Place is as much about exceptional details as it is about an exceptional location. Not only is the building itself listed the bow windows and the baroque staircase are too, though those features are stunning, there is arguably even more delight in the very fine Edwardian details – from the door handles, Louis XVI gilt cornicing and chandeliers, right down to the magnificent window latches. No.4 Hamilton Place may have an air of old luxury, but as far as service, comfort and technology are concerned, our guests demand the highest standards and services.

Royal Aeronautical Society
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
4 Hamilton Place
London, United Kingdom W1J 7BQ

+44 (0) 20 7670 4300

Azzurro Waterloo
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Arches 146 Sutton Walk
London, United Kingdom SE1 7ND

Playboy Club London
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
14 Old Park Lane
London, United Kingdom W1K 1

020 7491 8586

The eagerly awaited new gaming and entertainment venue spread over two floors, brings the Iconic Playboy Bunny back to Mayfair, 30 years after she left town. Traditional table games with Bunny dealers coupled with the latest in electronic roulette and slots will be the place to place your bets. The Ground floor has been designed to provide sexy yet sophisticated entertainment. The highly acclaimed Salvatore Calabrese brings a mix of high class cocktails in his self titled bar, a great way to start your evening or end your day. Want something with a little more energy, Baroque has the best of London's table service, naturally served by a Playboy Bunny. Playboy Club London will be exclusive to members and offer the ultimate fora London entertainment venue, 24 hours a day. To register your interest in membership visit www.playboyclublondon.com

Playboy Club Mayfair
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
14 Old Park Lane, London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

St James's Palace
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Rd, St James's SW1A 1DD
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1BS

Gold Duke Of Edingbrugh Presentations-St James Palace
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Marlborough Road St James's
London, United Kingdom SW1A 1BS

020 7930 4832