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Highbury Square, London | Tourist Information


Avenell Rd
London, United Kingdom N51EY

020 7861 5525

Highbury Square is an apartment complex in Highbury, London. It was originally Arsenal Stadium: the home stadium of Arsenal F.C. until 2006 when they moved out and into the newly built Emirates Stadium nearby.HistoryThe building was originally constructed in 1913 and designed by Archibald Leitch as Arsenal Stadium in the Art Deco style. It remained the home of Arsenal for 93 years until 2006, when they moved into the new Emirates Stadium.The complex cost Arsenal £130 million to build. In 2009, Arsenal sold 150 apartments in Highbury Square to London & Stamford Property at a 20 per cent discount to market value because several buyers failed to complete apartment purchases. Arsenal cleared their debt on Highbury Square by 2010.RedevelopmentThe North Bank and Clock End were demolished while the older Grade II listed buildings of the East and West Stands remained as part of the development. The pitch was redeveloped into gardens. Several parts of Arsenal Stadium were retained including the marble halls, the bust of Herbert Chapman and the players' tunnel. It was opened officially in 2009, by Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger.DetailsHighbury Square has 650 flats. Former Arsenal player Robert Pirès owns one of the flats. Although it houses private residences, Highbury Square was due to have a public footpath through it. Drainage issues in 2010 prevented this footpath from being opened, which led to it being called a "gated community" by local councillors.

Community and Government Near Highbury Square

Stamford Hill
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
London
London, United Kingdom N16 5

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Stamford Hill is a district in north London.Like many London districts, Stamford Hill has never been an administrative unit and so has never been given formal boundaries; however it can be described as having a usual and a wider definition and these are described in the next section (Bounds).The area is particularly known for its 30,000 Hasidic Jews, making it the largest concentration of Haredi Jews in Europe. Due to the high fertility among this community, the area has one of highest birthrates in the UK, with a crude birth rate of more than 25 per 1,000 of the population - twice as high as the UK average.Stamford Hill is also the name of part of the A10 road running through the area from Stoke Newington High Street to the start of Tottenham High Road.BoundsInformal boundariesThe more usual, and loose, definition is centred on the physical feature of the hill and the neighbourhood’s location within the Ancient Parish and subsequent (with almost identical boundaries) Metropolitan Borough of Hackney. The association of Stamford Hill with part of the N16 postcode district is also useful in describing its extent.Northern boundary with Tottenham: Takes the northern boundary of the AP\MB of Hackney. This corresponds to the current boundary between the modern borough of Hackney and Haringey.

Stoke Newington Town Hall
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Stoke Newington Church St
London, United Kingdom N16 0

020 8356 5230

Amy Winehouse's House
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
30 Camden Square
London, United Kingdom

Finsbury Park
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Seven Sisters Rd
London, United Kingdom N4 2DH

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Stoke Newington Common
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Stoke Newington Common
London, United Kingdom N16 7ES

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Stoke Newington Common is an open space in Stoke Newington in the London Borough of Hackney. It is east of Stoke Newington High Street, with Northwold Road to the north, and it straddles the busy Rectory Road. The Common is 2.15ha in area.This is old common land that came under public ownership in 1872. It was originally known as Cockhanger Green and later became Shacklewell Common, but Shacklewell's contracting sphere of influence led to it being named for a time 'Newington Common' (not to be confused with Newington Green) until finally in the early 20th century it acquired its present name.Not merely the common's name has been mangled by time. Unlike its near neighbour, Hackney Downs, this land has been dissected by London's Victorian transport links. The deep cutting of the railway line between Stoke Newington and Rectory Road railway stations runs straight through the common from north to south, while the parallel Rectory Road making part of the A10 gyratory slices off another strip to the west. Finally the road called Stoke Newington Common carrying a busy bus route chops off a section to the south.The now buried and lost Hackney Brook once ran across the north of the common, but this has long been replaced by the busy Northwold Road. This was due to the increased population at the time of its burial reducing the brook to no more than an open sewer.

MG Fit in Fitness Training
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Unit 6 Balmes Road
London, United Kingdom N1 5TQ

+44 2072548789

Our Personal Trainers at MG Fit in Fitness had studied Sport Science as part of their education. We are committed, motivated and will always ensure training is kept fun, safe and as individual as you are. We believe our unique Sports Science Based Personal Training is the best way to improve your fitness, lose weight or win that race by way of you continual technique analysis, constant motivation and every session is varied and will always challenge you. MG Fit in Fitness can get you ready for any event, whether it's a taking on Tough Mudder or wishing to look and feel fabulous on your wedding day. You set the goal – we will get you there!

London Meridian College
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
627 Holloway Road
London, United Kingdom

Londra Alevi Kultur Merkezi
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
89 Ridley Road
London, United Kingdom E8 2

0771953760

Ingiltere Alevi Kultur Merkezi Ve Cem Evi
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
25A Kingsdown Rd LND N19 4LD
London, United Kingdom E8 2

07424420488

Islington Council
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
222 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 1

020 7527 2000

Parafia Devonia
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
e3 2as
London, United Kingdom N1 8

07825770360

Chestnuts Arts & Community Centre
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
280 St Ann's Road
London, United Kingdom N15 5BN

0208 802 4649

The centre has a range of community users groups servicing the community in activities such as education, health, fitness, yoga, dance, sewing, martial arts, counselling and youth provision. We also have a number of rooms for hire.

Lady Margaret Road
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
111 Lady Margaret Rd
London, United Kingdom NW5 2XS

020 7482 4712

Manor House tube station
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
316 Green Lanes
London, United Kingdom N4 1

020 7222 1234

Manor House is a station on the Piccadilly line of the London Underground, on the boundary between Travelcard Zone 2 and Zone 3. It straddles the border between the London Boroughs of Hackney and Haringey, the postal address and three of the entrances being in the former, and one entrance in the latter.DescriptionThe station, named after a nearby public house, is situated at the junction of Seven Sisters Road and Green Lanes and was designed by Charles Holden. Opened on 19 September 1932, it lies between Finsbury Park and Turnpike Lane tube stations. Like all stations on the Cockfosters extension, Manor House station set new aesthetic standards, not previously seen on London's Underground. The station was equipped with nine street level entrances, two of which gave access to tram routes to and from Tottenham, Edmonton and Stamford Hill via tramway island exits into Seven Sisters Road. The last of these tram services were withdrawn in 1938 and replaced by trolleybuses and the exits were removed in 1951.

Islington High Street
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Islington High Street.
London, United Kingdom N1

Join the trendies on the 38 or 73 on their way to the Angel for a wonderful afternoon and evening in one of our trendy bars or restaurants. Feel free to stay for a while.

Redmond Community Centre
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Kayani Avenue
London, United Kingdom N4 2HF

02088027580

Igreja a Voz de Deus
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
5 Rossmore Road, Marylebone, London, NW1 6NJ
London, United Kingdom N4 4

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
8 All Saints Street
London, United Kingdom N1 9

Embassy Of The State Of Eritrea
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
96 White Lion St
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 20 7713 0096

The Embassy of Eritrea in London is the diplomatic mission of Eritrea in the United Kingdom. It is the eastern-most embassy in the city (ignoring the Mission of Somaliland), being far removed from most other embassies which are predominantly located in Central or West London.

Hackney Cypriot Association
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
5 Balls Pond Road
London, United Kingdom N1 4AX

+44 (0) 20 7249 4494

Landmark Near Highbury Square

Union Chapel, Islington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Union Chapel, Compton Terrace
London, United Kingdom N1 2UN

+44 20 7226 1686

Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homeless in Islington, London, England. Built in the late 19th century in the Gothic revival style, the church is Grade I-listed. It is at the top end of Upper Street, near Highbury Fields.The VenueThe church hosts live music and comedy events, and was voted London's Best Live Music Venue by readers of Time Out magazine in 2012.Margins Homelessness ProjectThe Margins Project, based in the Union Chapel, provides a range of support services to people facing homelessness, crisis and isolation. It operates a Sunday drop-in that provides meals, showers and laundry facilities. It also offers help with accessing housing, employment and health services and weekly art classes.Church in the ChapelUnion Chapel is a Congregational church, which describes itself as "liberal, inclusive, non-hierarchical, and non-conformist" and meets every Sunday for worship. The church is also open on Wednesday mornings for private prayer, and a Bible study group meets Wednesday lunchtime.HistoryThe congregation first met in 1799 in a house in Highbury Grove as a union of evangelical Anglicans and non-conformists, and moved to a previous building on the present site in Compton Terrace, just off Upper Street, in 1806. The current building is in the Victorian gothic style of architecture. It was designed by James Cubitt of Loughton, and built between 1874 and 1877, with further additions from 1877 to 1890, while Henry Allon was pastor. The chapel was used for a major scene in the 1982 film, Who Dares Wins. Since 1982, the charity Friends of Union Chapel has helped restore and preserve the church and organise activities. Behind the church is the large Sunday School, built on the Akron Plan.

Clissold Park
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Stoke Newington
Stoke Newington, United Kingdom N16 9

020 8356 8428

Clissold Park is a designated community park (22.57ha) in Stoke Newington, within the London Borough of Hackney. Its facilities include children's playgrounds, sports fields, a bowling green, tennis courts, the café and some other attractions including terrapins in its lakes, as well as deer, quail, and rabbits. The park also comprises remains of the New River, and the Capital Ring has some of its paths running through a small section of the park.HistoryClissold House was built, in the latter half of the 18th century, for Jonathan Hoare, a City merchant, Quaker, philanphropist and anti-slavery campaigner. The park was created to be his idyll, and the stretch of water which wends its way around the house was once part of the New River, a canal that supplied London with clean water from Hertfordshire.

Highbury Fields
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Highbury Hill
London, United Kingdom N5 1AR

Highbury Fields is an open space in Highbury, in the London Borough of Islington. At 11.75 hectares (29 acres), it is the largest open space in the borough.It extends north from Highbury Corner almost as far as Highbury Barn. Besides parkland, Highbury Fields contains recreational facilities including tennis courts and Highbury Pool, which reopened after refurbishment in January 2007.Georgian and Victorian terracesThe elegant houses surrounding the Fields are good examples of Georgian and Victorian town houses and are highly desirable residences. These terraces lie on three roads: Highbury Place, Highbury Crescent, and Highbury Terrace.John Dawes bought much of the demesne and began the residential development of Highbury. He granted leases in 1774-9 for 39 houses on Highbury Place. These were designed and built by John Spiller, a speculative builder of Southwark. The terrace was completed in 1777. Famous residents include: 1. Walter Sickert, the Impressionist painter, lived here and ran a rather unsuccessful school for artists at from 1927-31. 22. This became the home of Charles, the character played by Hugh Grant in Four weddings and a funeral. 25. John Wesley stayed here. 25. Joseph Chamberlain lived here from 1845-54. 39. John Spiller moved in when the terrace was completed in 1777. ??. Abraham Newland, chief cashier of the Bank of England, never slept out of it for 25 years. His house on Highbury Place was for daytime use only. The next major development around what was to become Highbury Fields was the construction of Highbury Terrace. The central part of the terrace dates to 1789. By 1794 nos. 1-16 had been built.

Archway, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
93c Junction Rd
London, United Kingdom N19 5RE

2072639163

Archway is a district of the London Borough of Islington in inner north London, England. On the A1, it is centred on Archway Tower and tube station.Archway is of medium elevation between Highgate above and Islington below and has seven small parks and two large parks. West of Archway is Whittington Hospital, beyond which is a larger area divided between Highgate Cemetery and Waterlow Park.HistoryThe name derives from the Archway bridge built in part of south Highgate for the minor road between south Highgate and Crouch End, Hornsey in 1896, the predecessor of Hornsey Lane Bridge.A tunnel was attempted more than once for the Highgate bypass, to join the Great North Road by avoiding the steep Highgate Hill and narrow roads of Highgate village. However, these failed on collapsing. Instead, today's large cutting was recommended by John Rennie and a high, multi-arched road bridge across this. The first bridge of 1813 was designed by John Nash and demolished in 1901; its replacement occasionally colloquially termed "suicide bridge" after a spate of such incidents in the early 20th century dates from 1897. The minor road over is Hornsey Lane.

Archway, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
93c Junction Rd
London, United Kingdom N19 5RE

2072639163

Archway is a district of the London Borough of Islington in inner north London, England. On the A1, it is centred on Archway Tower and tube station.Archway is of medium elevation between Highgate above and Islington below and has seven small parks and two large parks. West of Archway is Whittington Hospital, beyond which is a larger area divided between Highgate Cemetery and Waterlow Park.HistoryThe name derives from the Archway bridge built in part of south Highgate for the minor road between south Highgate and Crouch End, Hornsey in 1896, the predecessor of Hornsey Lane Bridge.A tunnel was attempted more than once for the Highgate bypass, to join the Great North Road by avoiding the steep Highgate Hill and narrow roads of Highgate village. However, these failed on collapsing. Instead, today's large cutting was recommended by John Rennie and a high, multi-arched road bridge across this. The first bridge of 1813 was designed by John Nash and demolished in 1901; its replacement occasionally colloquially termed "suicide bridge" after a spate of such incidents in the early 20th century dates from 1897. The minor road over is Hornsey Lane.

Odeon Holloway
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
419-427 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6LJ

0871 224 4007

Highbury
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, United Kingdom N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

Highbury
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, United Kingdom N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

Finsbury Park station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Seven Sisters Road
London, United Kingdom N4 2DH

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Finsbury Park station is a busy transport interchange in north London. The interchange consists of a National Rail station, a London Underground station and two bus stations, all interconnected. The main entrances are by the eastern bus station on Station Place. The National Rail ticket office here lies in between one entrance marked by the Underground roundel symbol, while the other is marked by the National Rail symbol, and provides direct access to the main line platforms. There is another exit by the western bus station along Wells Terrace, incorporating the Underground ticket office, plus a narrow side entrance to the south on the A503 Seven Sisters Road. The complex is located in Travelcard Zone 2.The station is named after the nearby Finsbury Park, one of the oldest of London's Victorian parks. It is also used by many Arsenal supporters on matchdays, as the club's ground is just a short walk away.When the Victoria line was built in the 1960s, the walls in Finsbury Park station were decorated with mosaics of duelling pistols, which can still be seen. This was based on a mistaken identification of Finsbury Park with Finsbury Fields, which was used by Londoners since medieval times for archery and sports, and also associated with 18th-century duels and one of the first hot air balloon flights. Finsbury Fields was close to the present-day Finsbury Square, 3mi south. At the same time the long entrance subways and the Wells Terrace booking hall (at the bus station end) were rebuilt to a high standard.

Stoke Newington Common
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Stoke Newington Common
London, United Kingdom N16 7ES

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Stoke Newington Common is an open space in Stoke Newington in the London Borough of Hackney. It is east of Stoke Newington High Street, with Northwold Road to the north, and it straddles the busy Rectory Road. The Common is 2.15ha in area.This is old common land that came under public ownership in 1872. It was originally known as Cockhanger Green and later became Shacklewell Common, but Shacklewell's contracting sphere of influence led to it being named for a time 'Newington Common' (not to be confused with Newington Green) until finally in the early 20th century it acquired its present name.Not merely the common's name has been mangled by time. Unlike its near neighbour, Hackney Downs, this land has been dissected by London's Victorian transport links. The deep cutting of the railway line between Stoke Newington and Rectory Road railway stations runs straight through the common from north to south, while the parallel Rectory Road making part of the A10 gyratory slices off another strip to the west. Finally the road called Stoke Newington Common carrying a busy bus route chops off a section to the south.The now buried and lost Hackney Brook once ran across the north of the common, but this has long been replaced by the busy Northwold Road. This was due to the increased population at the time of its burial reducing the brook to no more than an open sewer.

Piebury Corner The Pie Shop
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
209-211 Holloway Rd, London
London, United Kingdom N7 8DL

020 7700 5441

Piebury Corner is a Pie and a Pint shop selling award winning Pies, Scotch eggs, Craft Beers and Ciders from around the UK. All our pies are handmade and are available cold from the Deli or to eat in/take away with sides. Any pies left over at the end of the day go to 'The Pilion Trust' charity supporting young homeless people in Islington/Camden. DIRECTIONS The shop is 150 yards south of Holloway Road Tube Station (turn right out of the station). The stall (only open on Arsenal match days) is on the corner of Gillespie Road/Avenell Road (left out of Arsenal Tube Station.

Hen and Chickens Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
109 St Paul's Road
London, United Kingdom N1 2

020 7704 2001

The Hen and Chickens Theatre is a fringe venue for theatre and comedy situated above a pub at Highbury in the London Borough of Islington. The theatre management was awarded to actress Felicity Wren in 1999.The Mighty Boosh played here numerous times in their early comedy career

HM Prison Holloway
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
392 Camden Road
London, United Kingdom N7 0S

020 7979 4400

HM Prison Holloway is a closed category prison for adult women and young offenders in Holloway, London, England, operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service. It is the largest women's prison in western Europe. It was announced in 2015 that HMP Holloway will close due to its age and the fact it is unsuited to the needs of a modern prison.Holloway was used to imprison suffragettes including Constance Markeivicz (imprisoned for her part in the Irish Rebellion) Charlotte Despard, Mary Richardson, Dora Montefiore, Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington, and Ethel Smyth.In 2016, after the suspicious death of inmate Sarah Reed, her family claimed that the prison has forbidden them to examine the body.HistoryHolloway prison was opened in 1852 as a mixed-sex prison, but due to growing demand for space for female prisoners, particularly due to the closure of Newgate, it became female-only in 1903.BuildingHolloway Prison was completely rebuilt between 1971 and 1985 on the same site. The redevelopment resulted in the loss of the "grand turreted" gateway to the prison, which had been built in 1851; architectural critic Gavin Stamp was later to regret the loss and to note that the climate of opinion at the time was such that the Victorian Society felt unable to object.

Londra Aziziye Camii (Aziziye Mosque London)
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
117 - 119 Stoke Newington Road
London, United Kingdom N16 8BU

02072540046

The Aziziye Mosque (Turkish: Aziziye Camii) is a mosque in Stoke Newington, London, United Kingdom which is mainly attended by the British Turkish community. Originally built as a cinema, the building was first opened in 1913 as the Apollo Picture House and is among Hackney Council's "Locally Listed Buildings." In 1983, the UK Turkish Islamic Association (founded in 1979) bought and converted the building into an Ottoman style mosque with a capacity for 2,000 people. The mosque also has a Halal butchers, Aziziye Education Centre (weekend schools), Aziziye Wedding hall and a restaurant.

Holloway Road tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
299 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Holloway Road is a station on the London Underground. It is on the Piccadilly line between Caledonian Road and Arsenal stations, and in Travelcard Zone 2. The station opened on 15 December 1906.The station was constructed by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway and was built with two lift shafts, but only one was ever used for lifts. The second shaft was the site of an experimental spiral escalator which was built by the American inventor of escalators, Jesse W. Reno. The experiment was not successful and was never used by the public. In the 1990s, remains of the escalator equipment were excavated from the base of the lift shaft and stored at the London Transport Museum Depot in Acton. From the platforms, a second exit no longer in use is visible and leads to the back of the used lift shaft.The station is adjacent to the site of the former Holloway and Caledonian Road railway station.The station is close to the new Emirates Stadium, the new home of Arsenal football club. As part of the planning permission £5m was due to be spent expanding the current station to cope with increased passenger numbers on match days. However subsequent studies showed that to ensure the station could cope with the numbers the lifts would have to be replaced with escalators which would cost £60m. As a result, the redevelopment plans were put on hold and now at match times the station is exit only, and before a match eastbound trains do not call.

Finsbury Park Mosque
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
7-11 St. Thomas's Rd
London, United Kingdom N4 2Q

020 7424 5252

The Finsbury Park Mosque is a mosque located in Finsbury Park, London, London Borough of Islington, England.The mosque was affected by leadership disputes in the 1990s, allowing extremist Islamist preachers (many of whom were refugees from the Algerian Civil War) to take it over. In 1996 they installed Abu Hamza al-Masri as imam of the mosque, which subsequently developed a reputation as a centre of radical Islamism in London.In 2014, HSBC bank closed North London Central Mosque's bank account. Several reliable sources report that HSBC closed it because it donated some amount of money to the State of Palestine during the 2014 Israel–Gaza war.History and locationThe main building was opened in 1994 in a ceremony attended by Prince Charles. The mosque is located opposite Finsbury Park station, close to Arsenal Football Club's Emirates Stadium, in the London Borough of Islington.Former terrorism linksAl Qaeda operatives including "shoebomber" Richard Reid and Zacarias Moussaoui attended the mosque. In 2002, The Guardian reported that weapons training had taken place inside the building.

Essex Road railway station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
181 Essex Rd
London, United Kingdom N1 8

3457-484950

Essex Road railway station is a National Rail station in Canonbury in the London Borough of Islington. It is on the Northern City Line between and and is in Travelcard Zone 2. The station is at the junction of Essex Road, Canonbury Road and New North Road, with the present entrance on Canonbury Road. Operated by Great Northern, it is the only deep level underground station in London served solely by National Rail trains. Between 1933 and 1975 the station was operated as part of the London Underground, as a short branch of the Northern line. Between 1922 and 1948 the station name was Canonbury & Essex Road. The name reverted to the original form in 1948.HistoryThe station was opened on 14 February 1904 by the Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR) on its underground route between the Great Northern Railway (GNR) station at Finsbury Park and the Metropolitan Railway (MR) and City & South London Railway (C&SLR) station at Moorgate in the City of London.

Abney Park
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Abney Park Trust, Stoke Newington High Street
London, United Kingdom N16 0LH

0207 275 7557

Abney Park Cemetery is an oasis for nature in the middle of Stoke Newington. An atmospheric former cemetery with a ruined chapel and an incredible wild and overgrown atmosphere. Check out our page for information on walks, courses and other activities.

Landmark Near Highbury Square

Union Chapel, Islington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Union Chapel, Compton Terrace
London, United Kingdom N1 2UN

+44 20 7226 1686

Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homeless in Islington, London, England. Built in the late 19th century in the Gothic revival style, the church is Grade I-listed. It is at the top end of Upper Street, near Highbury Fields.The VenueThe church hosts live music and comedy events, and was voted London's Best Live Music Venue by readers of Time Out magazine in 2012.Margins Homelessness ProjectThe Margins Project, based in the Union Chapel, provides a range of support services to people facing homelessness, crisis and isolation. It operates a Sunday drop-in that provides meals, showers and laundry facilities. It also offers help with accessing housing, employment and health services and weekly art classes.Church in the ChapelUnion Chapel is a Congregational church, which describes itself as "liberal, inclusive, non-hierarchical, and non-conformist" and meets every Sunday for worship. The church is also open on Wednesday mornings for private prayer, and a Bible study group meets Wednesday lunchtime.HistoryThe congregation first met in 1799 in a house in Highbury Grove as a union of evangelical Anglicans and non-conformists, and moved to a previous building on the present site in Compton Terrace, just off Upper Street, in 1806. The current building is in the Victorian gothic style of architecture. It was designed by James Cubitt of Loughton, and built between 1874 and 1877, with further additions from 1877 to 1890, while Henry Allon was pastor. The chapel was used for a major scene in the 1982 film, Who Dares Wins. Since 1982, the charity Friends of Union Chapel has helped restore and preserve the church and organise activities. Behind the church is the large Sunday School, built on the Akron Plan.

Clissold Park
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Stoke Newington
Stoke Newington, United Kingdom N16 9

020 8356 8428

Clissold Park is a designated community park (22.57ha) in Stoke Newington, within the London Borough of Hackney. Its facilities include children's playgrounds, sports fields, a bowling green, tennis courts, the café and some other attractions including terrapins in its lakes, as well as deer, quail, and rabbits. The park also comprises remains of the New River, and the Capital Ring has some of its paths running through a small section of the park.HistoryClissold House was built, in the latter half of the 18th century, for Jonathan Hoare, a City merchant, Quaker, philanphropist and anti-slavery campaigner. The park was created to be his idyll, and the stretch of water which wends its way around the house was once part of the New River, a canal that supplied London with clean water from Hertfordshire.

Highbury Fields
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Highbury Hill
London, United Kingdom N5 1AR

Highbury Fields is an open space in Highbury, in the London Borough of Islington. At 11.75 hectares (29 acres), it is the largest open space in the borough.It extends north from Highbury Corner almost as far as Highbury Barn. Besides parkland, Highbury Fields contains recreational facilities including tennis courts and Highbury Pool, which reopened after refurbishment in January 2007.Georgian and Victorian terracesThe elegant houses surrounding the Fields are good examples of Georgian and Victorian town houses and are highly desirable residences. These terraces lie on three roads: Highbury Place, Highbury Crescent, and Highbury Terrace.John Dawes bought much of the demesne and began the residential development of Highbury. He granted leases in 1774-9 for 39 houses on Highbury Place. These were designed and built by John Spiller, a speculative builder of Southwark. The terrace was completed in 1777. Famous residents include: 1. Walter Sickert, the Impressionist painter, lived here and ran a rather unsuccessful school for artists at from 1927-31. 22. This became the home of Charles, the character played by Hugh Grant in Four weddings and a funeral. 25. John Wesley stayed here. 25. Joseph Chamberlain lived here from 1845-54. 39. John Spiller moved in when the terrace was completed in 1777. ??. Abraham Newland, chief cashier of the Bank of England, never slept out of it for 25 years. His house on Highbury Place was for daytime use only. The next major development around what was to become Highbury Fields was the construction of Highbury Terrace. The central part of the terrace dates to 1789. By 1794 nos. 1-16 had been built.

Archway, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
93c Junction Rd
London, United Kingdom N19 5RE

2072639163

Archway is a district of the London Borough of Islington in inner north London, England. On the A1, it is centred on Archway Tower and tube station.Archway is of medium elevation between Highgate above and Islington below and has seven small parks and two large parks. West of Archway is Whittington Hospital, beyond which is a larger area divided between Highgate Cemetery and Waterlow Park.HistoryThe name derives from the Archway bridge built in part of south Highgate for the minor road between south Highgate and Crouch End, Hornsey in 1896, the predecessor of Hornsey Lane Bridge.A tunnel was attempted more than once for the Highgate bypass, to join the Great North Road by avoiding the steep Highgate Hill and narrow roads of Highgate village. However, these failed on collapsing. Instead, today's large cutting was recommended by John Rennie and a high, multi-arched road bridge across this. The first bridge of 1813 was designed by John Nash and demolished in 1901; its replacement occasionally colloquially termed "suicide bridge" after a spate of such incidents in the early 20th century dates from 1897. The minor road over is Hornsey Lane.

Archway, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
93c Junction Rd
London, United Kingdom N19 5RE

2072639163

Archway is a district of the London Borough of Islington in inner north London, England. On the A1, it is centred on Archway Tower and tube station.Archway is of medium elevation between Highgate above and Islington below and has seven small parks and two large parks. West of Archway is Whittington Hospital, beyond which is a larger area divided between Highgate Cemetery and Waterlow Park.HistoryThe name derives from the Archway bridge built in part of south Highgate for the minor road between south Highgate and Crouch End, Hornsey in 1896, the predecessor of Hornsey Lane Bridge.A tunnel was attempted more than once for the Highgate bypass, to join the Great North Road by avoiding the steep Highgate Hill and narrow roads of Highgate village. However, these failed on collapsing. Instead, today's large cutting was recommended by John Rennie and a high, multi-arched road bridge across this. The first bridge of 1813 was designed by John Nash and demolished in 1901; its replacement occasionally colloquially termed "suicide bridge" after a spate of such incidents in the early 20th century dates from 1897. The minor road over is Hornsey Lane.

Odeon Holloway
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
419-427 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6LJ

0871 224 4007

Highbury
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, United Kingdom N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

Highbury
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, United Kingdom N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

Finsbury Park station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Seven Sisters Road
London, United Kingdom N4 2DH

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Finsbury Park station is a busy transport interchange in north London. The interchange consists of a National Rail station, a London Underground station and two bus stations, all interconnected. The main entrances are by the eastern bus station on Station Place. The National Rail ticket office here lies in between one entrance marked by the Underground roundel symbol, while the other is marked by the National Rail symbol, and provides direct access to the main line platforms. There is another exit by the western bus station along Wells Terrace, incorporating the Underground ticket office, plus a narrow side entrance to the south on the A503 Seven Sisters Road. The complex is located in Travelcard Zone 2.The station is named after the nearby Finsbury Park, one of the oldest of London's Victorian parks. It is also used by many Arsenal supporters on matchdays, as the club's ground is just a short walk away.When the Victoria line was built in the 1960s, the walls in Finsbury Park station were decorated with mosaics of duelling pistols, which can still be seen. This was based on a mistaken identification of Finsbury Park with Finsbury Fields, which was used by Londoners since medieval times for archery and sports, and also associated with 18th-century duels and one of the first hot air balloon flights. Finsbury Fields was close to the present-day Finsbury Square, 3mi south. At the same time the long entrance subways and the Wells Terrace booking hall (at the bus station end) were rebuilt to a high standard.

Stoke Newington Common
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
7 Stoke Newington Common
London, United Kingdom N16 7ES

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Stoke Newington Common is an open space in Stoke Newington in the London Borough of Hackney. It is east of Stoke Newington High Street, with Northwold Road to the north, and it straddles the busy Rectory Road. The Common is 2.15ha in area.This is old common land that came under public ownership in 1872. It was originally known as Cockhanger Green and later became Shacklewell Common, but Shacklewell's contracting sphere of influence led to it being named for a time 'Newington Common' (not to be confused with Newington Green) until finally in the early 20th century it acquired its present name.Not merely the common's name has been mangled by time. Unlike its near neighbour, Hackney Downs, this land has been dissected by London's Victorian transport links. The deep cutting of the railway line between Stoke Newington and Rectory Road railway stations runs straight through the common from north to south, while the parallel Rectory Road making part of the A10 gyratory slices off another strip to the west. Finally the road called Stoke Newington Common carrying a busy bus route chops off a section to the south.The now buried and lost Hackney Brook once ran across the north of the common, but this has long been replaced by the busy Northwold Road. This was due to the increased population at the time of its burial reducing the brook to no more than an open sewer.

Piebury Corner The Pie Shop
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
209-211 Holloway Rd, London
London, United Kingdom N7 8DL

020 7700 5441

Piebury Corner is a Pie and a Pint shop selling award winning Pies, Scotch eggs, Craft Beers and Ciders from around the UK. All our pies are handmade and are available cold from the Deli or to eat in/take away with sides. Any pies left over at the end of the day go to 'The Pilion Trust' charity supporting young homeless people in Islington/Camden. DIRECTIONS The shop is 150 yards south of Holloway Road Tube Station (turn right out of the station). The stall (only open on Arsenal match days) is on the corner of Gillespie Road/Avenell Road (left out of Arsenal Tube Station.

Hen and Chickens Theatre
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
109 St Paul's Road
London, United Kingdom N1 2

020 7704 2001

The Hen and Chickens Theatre is a fringe venue for theatre and comedy situated above a pub at Highbury in the London Borough of Islington. The theatre management was awarded to actress Felicity Wren in 1999.The Mighty Boosh played here numerous times in their early comedy career

HM Prison Holloway
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
392 Camden Road
London, United Kingdom N7 0S

020 7979 4400

HM Prison Holloway is a closed category prison for adult women and young offenders in Holloway, London, England, operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service. It is the largest women's prison in western Europe. It was announced in 2015 that HMP Holloway will close due to its age and the fact it is unsuited to the needs of a modern prison.Holloway was used to imprison suffragettes including Constance Markeivicz (imprisoned for her part in the Irish Rebellion) Charlotte Despard, Mary Richardson, Dora Montefiore, Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington, and Ethel Smyth.In 2016, after the suspicious death of inmate Sarah Reed, her family claimed that the prison has forbidden them to examine the body.HistoryHolloway prison was opened in 1852 as a mixed-sex prison, but due to growing demand for space for female prisoners, particularly due to the closure of Newgate, it became female-only in 1903.BuildingHolloway Prison was completely rebuilt between 1971 and 1985 on the same site. The redevelopment resulted in the loss of the "grand turreted" gateway to the prison, which had been built in 1851; architectural critic Gavin Stamp was later to regret the loss and to note that the climate of opinion at the time was such that the Victorian Society felt unable to object.

Londra Aziziye Camii (Aziziye Mosque London)
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
117 - 119 Stoke Newington Road
London, United Kingdom N16 8BU

02072540046

The Aziziye Mosque (Turkish: Aziziye Camii) is a mosque in Stoke Newington, London, United Kingdom which is mainly attended by the British Turkish community. Originally built as a cinema, the building was first opened in 1913 as the Apollo Picture House and is among Hackney Council's "Locally Listed Buildings." In 1983, the UK Turkish Islamic Association (founded in 1979) bought and converted the building into an Ottoman style mosque with a capacity for 2,000 people. The mosque also has a Halal butchers, Aziziye Education Centre (weekend schools), Aziziye Wedding hall and a restaurant.

Holloway Road tube station
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
299 Holloway Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 6

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

Holloway Road is a station on the London Underground. It is on the Piccadilly line between Caledonian Road and Arsenal stations, and in Travelcard Zone 2. The station opened on 15 December 1906.The station was constructed by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway and was built with two lift shafts, but only one was ever used for lifts. The second shaft was the site of an experimental spiral escalator which was built by the American inventor of escalators, Jesse W. Reno. The experiment was not successful and was never used by the public. In the 1990s, remains of the escalator equipment were excavated from the base of the lift shaft and stored at the London Transport Museum Depot in Acton. From the platforms, a second exit no longer in use is visible and leads to the back of the used lift shaft.The station is adjacent to the site of the former Holloway and Caledonian Road railway station.The station is close to the new Emirates Stadium, the new home of Arsenal football club. As part of the planning permission £5m was due to be spent expanding the current station to cope with increased passenger numbers on match days. However subsequent studies showed that to ensure the station could cope with the numbers the lifts would have to be replaced with escalators which would cost £60m. As a result, the redevelopment plans were put on hold and now at match times the station is exit only, and before a match eastbound trains do not call.

Finsbury Park Mosque
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
7-11 St. Thomas's Rd
London, United Kingdom N4 2Q

020 7424 5252

The Finsbury Park Mosque is a mosque located in Finsbury Park, London, London Borough of Islington, England.The mosque was affected by leadership disputes in the 1990s, allowing extremist Islamist preachers (many of whom were refugees from the Algerian Civil War) to take it over. In 1996 they installed Abu Hamza al-Masri as imam of the mosque, which subsequently developed a reputation as a centre of radical Islamism in London.In 2014, HSBC bank closed North London Central Mosque's bank account. Several reliable sources report that HSBC closed it because it donated some amount of money to the State of Palestine during the 2014 Israel–Gaza war.History and locationThe main building was opened in 1994 in a ceremony attended by Prince Charles. The mosque is located opposite Finsbury Park station, close to Arsenal Football Club's Emirates Stadium, in the London Borough of Islington.Former terrorism linksAl Qaeda operatives including "shoebomber" Richard Reid and Zacarias Moussaoui attended the mosque. In 2002, The Guardian reported that weapons training had taken place inside the building.

Essex Road railway station
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
181 Essex Rd
London, United Kingdom N1 8

3457-484950

Essex Road railway station is a National Rail station in Canonbury in the London Borough of Islington. It is on the Northern City Line between and and is in Travelcard Zone 2. The station is at the junction of Essex Road, Canonbury Road and New North Road, with the present entrance on Canonbury Road. Operated by Great Northern, it is the only deep level underground station in London served solely by National Rail trains. Between 1933 and 1975 the station was operated as part of the London Underground, as a short branch of the Northern line. Between 1922 and 1948 the station name was Canonbury & Essex Road. The name reverted to the original form in 1948.HistoryThe station was opened on 14 February 1904 by the Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR) on its underground route between the Great Northern Railway (GNR) station at Finsbury Park and the Metropolitan Railway (MR) and City & South London Railway (C&SLR) station at Moorgate in the City of London.

Abney Park
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Abney Park Trust, Stoke Newington High Street
London, United Kingdom N16 0LH

0207 275 7557

Abney Park Cemetery is an oasis for nature in the middle of Stoke Newington. An atmospheric former cemetery with a ruined chapel and an incredible wild and overgrown atmosphere. Check out our page for information on walks, courses and other activities.

Sports Venue and Stadium Near Highbury Square

Emirates Stadium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
75 Drayton Park
Islington, United Kingdom N5 1BU

Emirates Stadium has quickly established itself as one of the world's most stunning and spectacular sports stadia. Along with state-of-the-art facilities, the Club have incorporated stunning features from our Highbury history and personal touches from inspirational Arsenal manager, Arsène Wenger. With a capacity of over 60,000, the Emirates provides the perfect home for London's most successful club. Take a virtual tour: http://www.arsenal.com/emirates-stadium/virtual-tour

Highbury Fields
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Highbury Hill
London, United Kingdom N5 1AR

Highbury Fields is an open space in Highbury, in the London Borough of Islington. At 11.75 hectares (29 acres), it is the largest open space in the borough.It extends north from Highbury Corner almost as far as Highbury Barn. Besides parkland, Highbury Fields contains recreational facilities including tennis courts and Highbury Pool, which reopened after refurbishment in January 2007.Georgian and Victorian terracesThe elegant houses surrounding the Fields are good examples of Georgian and Victorian town houses and are highly desirable residences. These terraces lie on three roads: Highbury Place, Highbury Crescent, and Highbury Terrace.John Dawes bought much of the demesne and began the residential development of Highbury. He granted leases in 1774-9 for 39 houses on Highbury Place. These were designed and built by John Spiller, a speculative builder of Southwark. The terrace was completed in 1777. Famous residents include: 1. Walter Sickert, the Impressionist painter, lived here and ran a rather unsuccessful school for artists at from 1927-31. 22. This became the home of Charles, the character played by Hugh Grant in Four weddings and a funeral. 25. John Wesley stayed here. 25. Joseph Chamberlain lived here from 1845-54. 39. John Spiller moved in when the terrace was completed in 1777. ??. Abraham Newland, chief cashier of the Bank of England, never slept out of it for 25 years. His house on Highbury Place was for daytime use only. The next major development around what was to become Highbury Fields was the construction of Highbury Terrace. The central part of the terrace dates to 1789. By 1794 nos. 1-16 had been built.

The Castle Climbing Centre
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Green Lanes
London, United Kingdom N4 2HA

020 82117000

Indoor Rock Climbing and Bouldering. Parking outside is safe, there are yellows lines but it is private land so it is ok..

Club Level, Emirates Stadium
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Hornsey Road
London, United Kingdom N7 7

0845 262 0001

Alexander Palace
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
N22 7AY
London, United Kingdom N22 7AY

020 8365 2121

Highbury
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
26 Highbury Park
Harlow, United Kingdom N5 1EY

20-72262339

Highbury is a district in the London Borough of Islington.HistoryEarly HighburyThe area now known as Islington was part of the larger manor of Tolentone, which is mentioned in the Domesday Book. Tolentone was owned by Ranulf brother of Ilger and included all the areas north and east of Canonbury and Holloway Road. The manor house was situated by what is now the east side of Hornsey Road near the junction with Seven Sisters Road. After the manor decayed, a new manor house was built in 1271 (see below) to the south-east; to differentiate it from the original manor and because it was on a hill, it was called Highbury, from which the area takes its name.The site for Highbury Manor was possibly used by a Roman garrison as a summer camp. During the construction of a new Highbury House in 1781, tiles were found that could have been Roman or Norman; unfortunately these have been lost.Highbury ManorOwnership of Highbury eventually passed to Alicia de Barrow, who in 1271 gave it to the Priory of St John of Jerusalem, also known as the Knights Hospitallers in England. The wealthy Lord Prior built Highbury manor as a substantial stone country lodging with a grange and barn.In 1381, during the Peasants' Revolt, Jack Straw led a mob of 20,000 rioters who "so offended by the wealth and haughtiness" of the Knights Hospitallers destroyed the manor house. The Lord Prior at the time, Robert Hales, who had taken refuge in the Tower of London, was captured and beheaded on Tower Hill. Jack Straw and some of his followers used the site as a temporary headquarters; consequently the derelict manor became known for the next 500 years as Jack Straw’s Castle. This should not be confused with the better known Jack Straw’s Castle, formerly a pub and now residential flats at Whitestone Ponds, Hampstead, which was named after the semi-legendary leader of the revolt.

Market Road Pitches
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Market Road, Islington N7 9PL
London, United Kingdom N7 9PL

Arsenal Football Supporters Club
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
154 St Thomas's Rd
London, United Kingdom N5 1LQ

020 7226 1627

Fitness First Angel
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
361-373 City Road
London, United Kingdom EC1V 1AS

02072390390

Tottenham Hotspur (White Heart Lane)
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
748 High Road · London, United Kingdom ·
London, United Kingdom N17 0AP

+44 (0) 870 420 5000

CrossFit Evolving
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Archway 3, 303 Holloway Road
London, United Kingdom N7 8HS

07867805007

A CrossFit Box based in North London. Open since 2011 Email us for details

Fighting Fit Fencing
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Mount Carmel School, Archway
London, United Kingdom N19 3EU

020 36375707

Fighting Fit Fencing is a fencing club open to all ages, levels and abilities. We specialise in the art of Foil fencing but have many members who also fence epee and sabre. We have our own dedicated fencing venue allowing our members the opportunity to fence anytime they choose. All kit & equipment is provided free of charge. FREE taster sessions available to come along and meet our staff, members and supporters. Would love to see you at club soon.

Premier Fitness Club
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Unit 5, 13 to 18 Clifton House, 46 Clifton Terrace, Finsbury Park
London, United Kingdom N4 3JP

02075613265, www.premierfitness-club.co.uk

Premier Fitness Club is a state-of-the-art fitness and training club, home to the highly-acclaimed Premier trained PTs, equipped with the very latest Techno Gym equipment to offer members the most effective workout possible. The fitness club is fully staffed with Premier qualified fitness professionals who are on hand to offer support and advice and personal training.

Somers Town Community Sports Centre
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
134 Chalton Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 1RX

020 7419 4365

Pancras Square Leisure Centre
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
5 Pancras Square
London, United Kingdom NW1 1

0207 974 5555

Finsbury Park Athletics Track
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
8B Endymion Rd
London, United Kingdom N4 1EE

020 8802 9139

Moreno Boxing
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Bailey Place, Gillett Square
London, United Kingdom N16 8BA

00447949510959

We are not a traditional boxing gym – we operate in a modern studio gym providing for small group classes of a maximum of 12 participants per class. Our boxing classes are delivered by expert trainers fully qualified in personal training and sports science, who also have experience as competitive boxers. Founder Carlos Moreno is a 3 x international boxing champion, a 2014 national champion and was ranked number 8 in England in 2013. He founded Moreno Boxing in order to impart and share his knowledge with fitness enthusiasts who want a break from the traditional boxing clubs and fitness gyms, those seeking to learn a new craft while also getting fitter in the process. Our classes are effectively non-contact and our clients do not need to get involved in sparring or be hit if they do not wish, we want our clients to have a unique and enjoyable boxing training experience in a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. We focus heavily on teaching correct and effective boxing technique in a way that helps our clients build the necessary muscles and cardiovascular endurance to be able to increase their fitness levels while learning proper boxing.

DOWE Dynamics GYM
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
1 Central Hall Buildings
London, United Kingdom n19 3ub

020 7281 2267

Get 3 Months Free Membership*Friendly 1st Class Qualified Staff *Professional Personal Trainers *High Quality Equipment *Separate Cardio Vascular Area *Consultation Room for Personalised Programmes *Best Diet & Nutrition Advice *Treatment Rooms

Tennis & Squash at Coolhurst
Distance: 1.8 mi Tourist Information
Court Side
London, United Kingdom N8 8EY

0208 340 4272

Somerston Community Sports Centre
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
134 Chalton Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 1RX

+44 (0) 20 7419 4365

Landmark Near Highbury Square

Finsbury Park Mosque
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
7-11 St. Thomas's Rd
London, United Kingdom N4 2Q

020 7424 5252

The Finsbury Park Mosque is a mosque located in Finsbury Park, London, London Borough of Islington, England.The mosque was affected by leadership disputes in the 1990s, allowing extremist Islamist preachers (many of whom were refugees from the Algerian Civil War) to take it over. In 1996 they installed Abu Hamza al-Masri as imam of the mosque, which subsequently developed a reputation as a centre of radical Islamism in London.In 2014, HSBC bank closed North London Central Mosque's bank account. Several reliable sources report that HSBC closed it because it donated some amount of money to the State of Palestine during the 2014 Israel–Gaza war.History and locationThe main building was opened in 1994 in a ceremony attended by Prince Charles. The mosque is located opposite Finsbury Park station, close to Arsenal Football Club's Emirates Stadium, in the London Borough of Islington.Former terrorism linksAl Qaeda operatives including "shoebomber" Richard Reid and Zacarias Moussaoui attended the mosque. In 2002, The Guardian reported that weapons training had taken place inside the building.

Drayton Park
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
66 Drayton Park
London, United Kingdom N5 1

3457-484950

Drayton Park est une rue de Londres située dans le borough londonien d'Islington, quartier de Highbury. Son code postal est N5. On y trouve le siège de l'Arsenal Football Club situé au numéro 75 ainsi que son stade de l'Emirates Stadium.Ce site est desservi par la gare de Drayton Park.Voir aussiLien externeDescription sur londontown.com

The Bridge
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
121 Fonthill Road
London, United Kingdom N4 3HH

+447453366751 - +447472978924

Highbury Fields
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Highbury Hill
London, United Kingdom N5 1AR

Highbury Fields is an open space in Highbury, in the London Borough of Islington. At 11.75 hectares (29 acres), it is the largest open space in the borough.It extends north from Highbury Corner almost as far as Highbury Barn. Besides parkland, Highbury Fields contains recreational facilities including tennis courts and Highbury Pool, which reopened after refurbishment in January 2007.Georgian and Victorian terracesThe elegant houses surrounding the Fields are good examples of Georgian and Victorian town houses and are highly desirable residences. These terraces lie on three roads: Highbury Place, Highbury Crescent, and Highbury Terrace.John Dawes bought much of the demesne and began the residential development of Highbury. He granted leases in 1774-9 for 39 houses on Highbury Place. These were designed and built by John Spiller, a speculative builder of Southwark. The terrace was completed in 1777. Famous residents include: 1. Walter Sickert, the Impressionist painter, lived here and ran a rather unsuccessful school for artists at from 1927-31. 22. This became the home of Charles, the character played by Hugh Grant in Four weddings and a funeral. 25. John Wesley stayed here. 25. Joseph Chamberlain lived here from 1845-54. 39. John Spiller moved in when the terrace was completed in 1777. ??. Abraham Newland, chief cashier of the Bank of England, never slept out of it for 25 years. His house on Highbury Place was for daytime use only. The next major development around what was to become Highbury Fields was the construction of Highbury Terrace. The central part of the terrace dates to 1789. By 1794 nos. 1-16 had been built.

Clissold Park
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Stoke Newington
Stoke Newington, United Kingdom N16 9

020 8356 8428

Clissold Park is a designated community park (22.57ha) in Stoke Newington, within the London Borough of Hackney. Its facilities include children's playgrounds, sports fields, a bowling green, tennis courts, the café and some other attractions including terrapins in its lakes, as well as deer, quail, and rabbits. The park also comprises remains of the New River, and the Capital Ring has some of its paths running through a small section of the park.HistoryClissold House was built, in the latter half of the 18th century, for Jonathan Hoare, a City merchant, Quaker, philanphropist and anti-slavery campaigner. The park was created to be his idyll, and the stretch of water which wends its way around the house was once part of the New River, a canal that supplied London with clean water from Hertfordshire.

Studio Four
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
231 Stoke Newington Church Street
London, United Kingdom N169HP

02078129188

Knipe Towers
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
2A Crane Grove
London, United Kingdom N78LE

02077006977

Arts and Media School, Islington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Turle Rd
London, United Kingdom N4 3

(020) 7281 5511

Arts and Media School Islington, is a small co-educational secondary school and is located towards the north of the London Borough of Islington. It is classified as a comprehensive trust foundation school. Susan Service was appointed headteacher in 2016 after having served as the deputy head of curriculum for 5 years.HistoryThe Victorian building, still in use today, was originally Montem St School. Later the school was known as Tollington Park Secondary School and, more recently, as George Orwell School.The facilities were used as a filming location in the Academy Award-nominated 2006 film Notes on a Scandal.PartnershipsPartners vary from across the curriculum and include The Barbican, Arsenal FC, and the Music in Secondary Schools Trust. In addition, the school works closely with a number of local primary schools, sharing skills and expertise in key academic subjects. Each term they open their doors to their primary partners, offering a variety of master classes, workshops, and activity days.Notable students Sydney Carter, author of the lyrics of the song "Lord of the Dance" Jermain Jackman, winner of the third series of the BBC television singing competition The Voice UK in 2014 Don McCullin, photo journalist who attended the school in the late 1940s Kassius Nelson, actress currently starring as Jade Albright in the Channel 4 television programme Hollyoaks Kaya Scodelario, actress starring in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Jay Simpson, professional footballer currently playing for Leyton Orient Troy Titus-Adams, actress

Newington Green Unitarian Church
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
39A Newington Green
London, United Kingdom N16 9

020 7226 0276

Newington Green Unitarian Church in north London is one of England's oldest Unitarian churches. It has had strong ties to political radicalism for over 300 years, and is London's oldest Nonconformist place of worship still in use. It was founded in 1708 by English Dissenters, a community of which had been gathering around Newington Green for at least half a century before that date. The church belongs to the umbrella organisation known as the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, and has had an upturn in its fortunes since the turn of the millennium.Its most famous minister was Dr Richard Price, a political radical who is remembered for his role in the Revolution Controversy, a British debate about the French Revolution, but who also did pioneering work in finance and statistics. The most famous member of its congregation was Mary Wollstonecraft, who drew inspiration from Price's sermons in her work, both in arguing for the new French republic and in raising the issue of the rights of women.The building, which faces the north side of the green, was extended in 1860, and was listed in 1953. It lies within the London Borough of Hackney, although the rest of the green is part of the London Borough of Islington.

Union Chapel, Islington
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Union Chapel, Compton Terrace
London, United Kingdom N1 2UN

+44 20 7226 1686

Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homeless in Islington, London, England. Built in the late 19th century in the Gothic revival style, the church is Grade I-listed. It is at the top end of Upper Street, near Highbury Fields.The VenueThe church hosts live music and comedy events, and was voted London's Best Live Music Venue by readers of Time Out magazine in 2012.Margins Homelessness ProjectThe Margins Project, based in the Union Chapel, provides a range of support services to people facing homelessness, crisis and isolation. It operates a Sunday drop-in that provides meals, showers and laundry facilities. It also offers help with accessing housing, employment and health services and weekly art classes.Church in the ChapelUnion Chapel is a Congregational church, which describes itself as "liberal, inclusive, non-hierarchical, and non-conformist" and meets every Sunday for worship. The church is also open on Wednesday mornings for private prayer, and a Bible study group meets Wednesday lunchtime.HistoryThe congregation first met in 1799 in a house in Highbury Grove as a union of evangelical Anglicans and non-conformists, and moved to a previous building on the present site in Compton Terrace, just off Upper Street, in 1806. The current building is in the Victorian gothic style of architecture. It was designed by James Cubitt of Loughton, and built between 1874 and 1877, with further additions from 1877 to 1890, while Henry Allon was pastor. The chapel was used for a major scene in the 1982 film, Who Dares Wins. Since 1982, the charity Friends of Union Chapel has helped restore and preserve the church and organise activities. Behind the church is the large Sunday School, built on the Akron Plan.

Brahlistan
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
2 Dove Road, The Pinnacle 7
London, United Kingdom N1 3PL

+447702345828

Crouch Hill railway station
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
36 Crouch Hill London Borough Of Islington
London, United Kingdom N4 4AU

0845 601 4867

Crouch Hill railway station is a London Overground station on Crouch Hill between Stroud Green and Crouch End in the London Borough of Islington, north London. It is on the Gospel Oak to Barking line between Upper Holloway and Harringay Green Lanes.The National Location Code (NLC) for this station is 7406.DesignThe station has two platforms, one for each direction. Platform 1 is for trains toward and platform 2 is for trains toward. This station does not have a ticket office except for the security office, which is not officially part of the station but is next to the stairs to one of the platforms. However, staff are present on the platforms during the hours trains are running. This station has two ticket and two Oyster card machines; one for each platform as well as two waiting rooms. This station has a shelter on each platform. The platforms are only reachable by stairs.There are no current plans to introduce lift access. The station was briefly equipped with APTIS ticketing equipment in 1988/89.ServicesSince January 2010, trains run every 15 minutes in each direction, towards either or throughout the day. All trains from the station are operated by London Overground. The typical off-peak service in trains per hour (tph) is: 4 tph westbound to Gospel Oak4 tph eastbound to Barking From June 2016 until February 2017, services are disrupted due to ongoing electrification work (including track lowering, bridge reconstruction, overhead wire installation and platform lengthening). Weekday trains are only running between Gospel Oak and South Tottenham until late September, with a total line blockade in place thereafter until February 2017. Weekend services meanwhile will be replaced by buses until June 2017.

Holloway School
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Hilldrop Rd
London, United Kingdom N7 0

0207 607 5885

Holloway School is a coeducational community secondary school, located in the Holloway area of the London Borough of Islington, England.HistoryThe school was first established in September 1907 as a boys' school named Camden Secondary School for Boys, it later changed its name to Holloway County Grammar School and then to Holloway Comprehensive School.PresentHolloway School is coeducational and specialises in sports.Holloway School offers GCSEs as programmes of study for pupils. Although the school does not operate its own sixth form, graduating pupils are guaranteed a place at City and Islington College through the City and Islington Sixth Form Consortium.

Aziziye Mosque
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
117 Stoke Newington Rd
London, United Kingdom N16 8BU

020 7254 0046

The Aziziye Mosque is a mosque in Stoke Newington, London. The mosque was funded by the UK Turkish Islamic Association and the conversion began in 1983. Turks who had once felt reluctant to attend a ‘non-Turkish’ mosque welcomed the congregation as services were provided in the Turkish language rather than in English or Arabic. The total capacity of its Ottoman style mosque is 2,000 people. The mosque also has a Halal butchers, Aziziye Education Centre, Aziziye Wedding hall and a restaurant.Originally built as a cinema, it first opened in 1913 as the Apollo Picture House, was reopened in 1933 as the Ambassador Cinema and from 1974 played martial arts films and softcore sex films as the Astra Cinema, before closing in 1983. It is among Hackney Council's "Locally Listed Buildings."

Abney Park
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Abney Park Trust, Stoke Newington High Street
London, United Kingdom N16 0LH

0207 275 7557

Abney Park Cemetery is an oasis for nature in the middle of Stoke Newington. An atmospheric former cemetery with a ruined chapel and an incredible wild and overgrown atmosphere. Check out our page for information on walks, courses and other activities.

Chik Chicken
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
near venue (New Cross)
London, United Kingdom SE

telephone too greasy to pick up

The Screen On The Green
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
83 Upper Street
London, United Kingdom N1 0

20-72263520

The Screen On The Green is a single screen cinema facing Islington Green in the London Borough of Islington, London. The current building was opened in 1913 and it is one of the oldest continuously running cinemas in the UK. It is an example of the many purpose-built cinemas that followed the regulations set by the Cinematograph Act 1909.It is distinctive in the local area due to its façade outlined in red neon, along with a large canopy used for advertising current and upcoming films and events.Since 2008, the cinema has been operated by Everyman Cinemas Group, who have expanded their interests into a unique premium cinemas across London (including the original Everyman Cinema in Hampstead), Surrey and Hampshire.Now retitled as 'Everyman Screen on the Green', the cinema offers a variety of films and special events, including the National Theatre Live, live Q&As, film festivals and seasons. The venue is equipped with Sony Digital 4K projectors and Dolby Digital surround sound.HistoryEarly history and foundation (1910 - 1913)Cinematic entertainment began at number 83 Upper Street, Islington when the Pesaresi brothers ran their original animated picture show in the then vacant shop. After success, and gaining financial assistance from Thomas Harrold who ran the "fancy drapery" store next door at number 82, they bought out Stean's Printers, Fosdykes' Confectionery and Vivian Lester's Sign Writers, numbers 84 to 86 respectively. They demolished the old shops and built a new purpose-built electric theatre designed by architects Boreham & Gladding, which opened in October 1913.

De Beauvoir Towers
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
10 De Beauvoir Square
London, United Kingdom N1 4LG

Amusement World Fun Fair
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
shoreditch park new north road
London, United Kingdom N1

07970555291

Ruby's Munchbox
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
Enfield Road
London, United Kingdom N1 5EN