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Somerset House, London | Tourist Information


somersethouse.org.uk
twitter.com/somersethouse

Strand
London, United Kingdom WC2R 1LA

+44 (0)20 7845 4600

A unique part of the London cultural scene with a distinctive public programme including Skate, concerts, an open-air film season, a diverse range of temporary exhibitions focusing on contemporary culture, an extensive learning programme, free guided tours and 55 fountains that dance in the The Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court in summer. Somerset House currently attracts approximately 2.5 million visitors every year.

Historical Place Near Somerset House

Big Ben
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
The Clock Tower, Houses of Parliament, Palace of Westminister, London
Westminster, SW1A 0AA

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower.

The London Dungeon
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The London Dungeon, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road
London, SE1 7PB

Situated in County Hall next to the Coca-Cola London Eye, the London Dungeon is a 110 minute journey through London's darkest history. The London Dungeon brings 1000 years of authentic London history to life with a unique mix of talented live actors, stunning special effects, edge of your seat surprises and two exciting thrill rides. Guests embark on a journey through a dramatic London landscape going back ten centuries. They are guided through ghastly plague-ridden streets, witness Guy Fawkes’ dramatic plot to blow up Parliament, travel back to Jack the Ripper’s bleak Whitechapel and walk beneath London’s foreboding medieval gates. Expect to meet Sweeney Todd, the infamous Barber, and his evil sidekick, Mrs Lovett alongside Jack the Ripper with one of his unfortunate victims Mary Jane Kelly. They will be joined by murderous monarch Henry VIII ‘virtually’ played by boisterous British acting giant, Brian Blessed, gunpowder plotter Guy Fawkes and a supporting cast of torturers, plague victims and dark jesters. Guests can also expect close encounters with non-human ‘talent’ including giant cockroaches and the Dungeon’s resident family of scurrying rats! As well as 19 shows, and innumerable unexpected surprises, the attraction will boast two state-of-the art thrill rides with high-tech surprises guaranteed to get adrenaline pumping. A fast flowing boat ride sees guests condemned by Henry VIII – played virtually by boisterous British acting legend Brian Blessed - to a turbulent journey along the dank River Thames towards execution. Whilst on a deadly dark drop ride they will literally be sentenced to ‘take the drop’ as they plunge three stories in the pitch dark. A chilling, screams-guaranteed, Whitechapel labyrinth will baffle guests as they try to escape ‘Jack’ and find their way out of the East End and a strange but fun journey through Balzelgette’s Victorian Sewer system will leave guests in a disorientated spin. At the end of your tour, join us in the Dungeon Tavern, a Victorian pub experience. Your first drink is on us!

Piccadilly Circus - London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Picadilly Circus
London, London W1D 7ET

London Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square, Westminster, London
London, WC2N 5DN

Horse Guards
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Horse Guards Parade
London, SW1A 2

020 7930 4832

Horse Guards is a large Grade I listed building in the Palladian style between Whitehall and Horse Guards Parade in London. The first Horse Guards building was built on the site of the former tiltyard of Westminster Palace in 1664. It was demolished in 1749 and was replaced by the current building which was built between 1750 and 1753 by John Vardy after the death of original architect in 1748 William Kent. Horse Guards Road runs north-south on the western boundary of the parade ground, while Horse Guards Avenue runs east from Whitehall on other side of the building, to Victoria Embankment.The building served as the offices of the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces until 1904 when the post was abolished and replaced by the Chief of the General Staff. The Chief of the General staff moved to the Old War Office Building in 1906 and Horse Guards subsequently became the headquarters of two major Army commands: the London District and the Household Cavalry. The building is the formal entrance to St James's Palace via St. James's Park (though this is now entirely symbolic). Only the monarch is allowed to drive through its central archway, or those given a pass (formerly made of ivory).

Windsor Castle
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Windsor Castle
Windsor, SL4 1NJ

+44 (0)20 7766 7304

Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1

020 79476000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

Trafalgar Studios
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
14 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2

Trafalgar Studios, formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004, is a West End theatre in Whitehall, near Trafalgar Square, in the City of Westminster, London.Also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation, the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Othello. Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.History1930 to 1996The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre's licensee. In November 1933 Henry Daniell appeared there as Portman in Afterwards. Hackett presented several other plays of his own before leaving in 1934, and the theatre built its reputation for modern comedies throughout the rest of the decade. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years.

The Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2A 2LL

020 79476000

The Cenotaph, Whitehall
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall
London, SW1A 2BX

The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England. Its origin is in a temporary structure erected for a peace parade following the end of the First World War and after an outpouring of national sentiment it was replaced in 1920 by a permanent structure and designated the United Kingdom's primary national war memorial.Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location. An annual Service of Remembrance is held at the site on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day) each year. Lutyens' cenotaph design has been reproduced elsewhere in the UK and in other countries including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Bermuda and Hong Kong.OriginsThe first cenotaph was a wood-and-plaster structure designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and erected in 1919. It was one of a number of temporary structures erected for the London Victory Parade (also called the Peace Day Parade) on 19 July 1919. It marked the formal end of the First World War that had taken place with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919. As one of a series of temporary wooden monuments constructed along the route of the parade, Whitehall's was not proposed until two weeks before the event. Following deliberations by the Peace Celebrations Committee, Lutyens was invited to Downing Street. There, the British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, proposed that the monument should be a catafalque, like the one intended for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris for the corresponding Victory Parade in France, but Lutyens proposed instead that the design be based on a cenotaph.

Middle Temple
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 7

02074274800

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.HistoryIn the 13th century, the Inns of Court originated as hostels and schools for student lawyers. The Middle Temple is the western part of "The Temple", the headquarters of the Knights Templar until they were dissolved in 1312. The Temple Church still stands as a "peculiar" (extra-diocesan) church of the Inner and Middle Temples.The Inns stopped being responsible for legal education in 1852, although they continue to provide training in areas such as advocacy and ethics for students, pupil barristers and newly qualified barristers. Most of the Inn is occupied by barristers' offices, known as chambers. One of the Middle Temple's main functions now is to provide education and support for new members to the profession. This is done through advocacy training, the provision of scholarships (over £1 million in 2011), subsidised accommodation both in the Temple and in Clapham, and by providing events where junior members may meet senior colleagues for help and advice.

The Banqueting House
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Whitehall House, 41 Whitehall
London, SW1A 2ER

+44 (0) 844 482 7777

This revolutionary building, the first in England to be designed in a Palladian style by Inigo Jones, was finished in 1622 for James I. Intended for the splendour and exuberance of court masques, the Banqueting House is probably most famous for one real life drama: the execution of Charles I which took place here in 1649 to the ‘dismal, universal groan’ of the crowd. One of Charles’ last sights was he walked through the Banqueting House to his death was the magnificent ceiling, painted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1630-4.

Downing Street
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
st. Downing
London, SW1A 2

020 7270 3000

Downing Street in London, United Kingdom, has for more than three hundred years housed the official residences of two of the most senior British Cabinet ministers: the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom; and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister's official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor's official residence is next door at Number 11. The government's Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip's residence is at Number 9.Downing Street is in Whitehall in central London, a few minutes' walk from the Houses of Parliament and a little further from Buckingham Palace. The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. The houses on the south side of the street were demolished in the 19th century to make way for government offices now occupied by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. "Downing Street" is used as a metonym for the Government of the United Kingdom.

Cleopatra's Needle
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Thames Embankment
London, WC2N 6

020 7234 5800

One Great George Street
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
1 Great George Street
London, SW1P 3AA

+44 (0)20 7665 2323

One Great George Street is a four-domed grade II listed Edwardian building used as a conference and wedding venue just off Parliament Square in Westminster, London, England. The building is also the global headquarters of the Institution of Civil Engineers ; it was originally a venue for ICE members to relax, meet and have conferences, and became available for public events in 1989. It is near the Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey, and St James's Park.Building and historyFrom 1839 until 1913, ICE occupied numbers 24–26 Great George Street. In the mid-1880s the government proposed re-development of the area around Great George Street to provide more office space for government departments. This meant the demolition of ICE's first location and led ICE to move its headquarters across the road to numbers 1-7.One Great George Street was built for the ICE between 1910 and 1913 and was the result of an architectural competition won by James Miller, RSA (1860–1947). His winning design was priced at £77,126, with the other architects involved in the design competition including Brigg, Wolstenholme & Thornely, John Belcher, William Emerson, Charles Edward Barry and Thomas Collcutt. The contractor who built the building was Mowlem.

HMS President
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

Honourable Society of Inner Temple
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Arbitration Rooms, 36-37 Essex St
London, WC2R 3AT

020 7413 0375

Sir John Soane's Museum
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
13 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3BP

Sir John Soane's Museum was formerly the home of the neo-classical architect John Soane. It holds many drawings and models of Soane's projects and the collections of paintings, drawings and antiquities that he assembled.The museum is located in Holborn, London, adjacent to Lincoln's Inn Fields. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.HistoryHousesSoane demolished and rebuilt three houses in succession on the north side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. He began with No. 12 (between 1792 and 1794), externally a plain brick house. After becoming Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806, Soane purchased No. 13, the house next door, today the Museum, and rebuilt it in two phases in 1808–09 and 1812.In 1808–09 he constructed his drawing office and "museum" on the site of the former stable block at the back, using primarily top lighting. In 1812 he rebuilt the front part of the site, adding a projecting Portland Stone facade to the basement, ground and first floor levels and the centre bay of the second floor. Originally this formed three open loggias, but Soane glazed the arches during his lifetime. Once he had moved into No. 13, Soane rented out his former home at No. 12 (on his death it was left to the nation along with No. 13, the intention being that the rental income would fund the running of the Museum).

Unilever House
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
100 Victoria Embankment, Blackfriars
London, EC4Y 0DY

020 7822 5252

Unilever House is a Grade II listed office building in the Neoclassical Art Deco style, located on New Bridge Street, Victoria Embankment in Blackfriars, London. The building has a tall, curving frontage which overlooks Blackfriars Bridge on the north bank of the River Thames.The site of Unilever House was previously occupied by Bridewell Palace, a residence of Henry VIII, which later became a poorhouse and prison. These buildings were destroyed in 1864 making way for De Keyser's Royal Hotel. In 1920, Lord Leverhulme leased the site to build the London headquarters of his soap manufacturing company Lever Brothers, which became Unilever in 1930. Construction did not commence until 1929.ConstructionThe building design and construction is thought to be a collaboration between James Lomax-Simpson, a member of the Unilever Board, and John James Burnet and Thomas S. Tait, partners in the firm of Sir John Burnet and Partners. However, there is some uncertainty over the credit for the design; a note by Simpson claims exclusive credit, suggesting that Burnet and Tait only approved the final design. Burnet and Tait exhibited the design as a joint work with Simpson at the Royal Academy, and the drawings held at the City of London Record Office are signed by Burnet and Tait alone.

Temple, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
2 Temple Place
London, IG8 7

20-85056687

The Temple is an area of central London, in the vicinity of Temple Church, It is one of the main legal districts of the capital and a notable centre for English law, both historically and in the present day. The Temple area of the City of London consists of the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, which are two of the four Inns of Court and act as local authorities in place of the City of London Corporation within their areas.The Royal Courts of Justice are just to the north and Temple tube station is located to the west in the City of Westminster. The wider Temple area is roughly bound by the River Thames (the Victoria Embankment) to the south, Surrey Street to the west, Strand and Fleet Street to the north, and Carmelite Street and Whitefriars Street to the east.It contains many barristers' chambers, solicitors' offices, as well as some notable legal institutions such as the Employment Appeal Tribunal. The International Institute for Strategic Studies has its headquarters at Arundel House.

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Middle Temple Lane
London, EC4Y 9BT

020 7427 4800

A modern institution with a long and distinguished history, Middle Temple is a place of many parts. First and foremost, Middle Temple is one of the four Inns of Court which have the exclusive right to Call students to the Bar. The education and training of advocates lie at the heart of the Inn, but we are also a professional society for our membership worldwide; and we maintain a heritage estate in central London housing chambers from which barristers practise. Several important activities support Middle Temple’s core functions. In addition to teaching, training and the management of the Inn’s property portfolio, these include the provision of around £1 million per year in support of our students and other junior members; the running of a modern Law library and an historic archive; the oversight (with Inner Temple) of the historic Temple Church; and the management of a commercial events business. All of these activities represent the 21st century Middle Temple, but training and education will always be at its core. Our core purposes The Inn’s estate on the banks of the Thames was provided by Letters Patent to ‘The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple’ in 1608 on condition that it would always be used for the joint objectives of educating and accommodating those practising or training in the Law. Over four hundred years later, Middle Temple’s core purposes are still based on these founding principles: • The education and training of students and barristers; and the promotion of diversity and access to the Bar by the provision of financial support to students and all other means. • The maintenance of the Inn’s estate and its historic heritage; and the provision of professional accommodation for barristers and other services and facilities in support of the Inn’s core purposes. • The achievement of the highest standards of advocacy in support of the judiciary and the rule of law; the promotion of the ethos of the Bar; and the maintenance of the highest professional standards in the public interest. Who we are Middle Temple’s membership comprises students, barristers and senior members of the Bar and Judiciary. Members of the Inn’s Governing Body (Parliament) are known as Masters of the Bench. The Chairman is the Treasurer, who is elected each year for a 12-month period of office. The Chief Executive, who is a full-time permanent member of the Inn’s staff, is the Under Treasurer. A staff of 90 permanent employees assist the Under Treasurer with the day-to-day management and operation of the Inn, along with part-time staff who support our corporate events.

Old Bailey Central Criminal Court
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7EH
London, EC4M 7EH

020 7248 3277

The Reform Club, Pall Mall
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Pall Mall Street 104
London, SW1Y 5EW

020 7930 9374

Summer Set House
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+442078454600

Magpie & Stump
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
18 Old Bailey
London, EC4M 7EP

0207 248 5085

The British Museum Friends
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Great Russell Street
London, WC1B 3DG

0207 323 8195

Bush House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
61 Aldwych
London, WC2B 4

Bush House is a Grade II listed building between Aldwych and the Strand in Central London at the southern end of Kingsway.Now part of the Strand Campus of King's College London, Bush House previously served as the headquarters of BBC World Service. The broadcast from Bush House lasted for 70 years, from Winter 1941 to Summer 2012. The final BBC broadcast from Bush House was the 12pm BST English bulletin on 12 July 2012. The BBC World Service is now housed in Broadcasting House in Portland Place. King's College London has taken over the premises since acquiring the lease in 2015.HistorySections of Bush House were completed and opened over a period of 10 years: Centre Block was opened in 1925, North-West Wing in 1928, North-East Wing in 1929, South-East Wing in 1930, and South-West Wing in 1935. The full building complex was completed in 1935.The building was commissioned, designed and originally owned by American individuals and companies. Irving T. Bush gained approval for his plans for the building in 1919, which was planned as a major new trade centre and designed by American architect Harvey Wiley Corbett. The construction was undertaken by John Mowlem & Co. At least one stonemason, Frederick Horton (died 17 Sep 1920, age 50) is known to have died during the construction, but overall the building had a very good safety record.

Staple Inn
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
11Staples Yard
London, WC1V 7

Staple Inn is a Tudor building on the south side of High Holborn street in the City of London, London, England. Located near Chancery Lane tube station, it is used as the London venue for meetings of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, and is the last surviving Inn of Chancery. It was designated a grade I listed building in 1974.HistoryIt was originally attached to Gray's Inn, which is one of the four Inns of Court. The Inns of Chancery fell into decay in the 19th century. All of them were dissolved, and most were demolished. Staple Inn is the only one which survives largely intact. It was an extra-parochial area until 1858 and then a civil parish. It became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn in 1900 and was abolished in 1930.On 1 April 1994 boundary changes meant that the Inn was transferred from the London Borough of Camden to the City of London (and the City ward of Farringdon Without).It was the model for the fictitious Inn of Court "Bacon's Inn" in Arthur Moore's 1904 novel 'Archers of the Long Bow'. The ancient switch-tailed double pump referred to was replaced in 1937 by a mock single pump, to mark the site.

St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
St Andrew's Hill & Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 5DE

+44 20 7329 3632

St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is a Church of England church located on Queen Victoria Street, London in the City of London, near Blackfriars station.HistoryFirst mentioned around 1170, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe was almost certainly founded considerably earlier. During the 13th century the church was a part of Baynard's Castle, an ancient royal residence. In 1361, Edward III moved his Royal Wardrobe (a storehouse for Royal accoutrements, housing arms and clothing among other personal items of the Crown) from the Tower of London to just north of the church. It was from this association that the church acquired its unique name.The Wardrobe and the church, however, were both lost in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Of the 51 churches designed by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire, St. Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe is among the simplest of his designs; it was rebuilt in 1695.The church was again destroyed during the London blitz by German bombing; only the tower and walls survived. It was rebuilt and rededicated in 1961.AdvowsonThe advowson of St Andrew's was anciently held by the family of FitzWalter to which it probably came from the holding by Robert Fitzwalter (d.1235) of the office of Constable of Baynard's Castle. In 1417 it was held by Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Baron Berkeley (d.1417), as his charter dated 24 June 1417 appointing feoffees to his estate records. Berkeley's Inn, the town house of that family stood nearby, at the south end of Adle Street, against Puddle Wharf, as reported by John Stow in his "Survey of London" (1598)

Tourist Attraction Near Somerset House

Royal Opera House
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Bow Street
London, WC2E 9DD

+44 (0) 20 7240 1200

The Royal Opera, under the direction of Antonio Pappano, is one of the world’s leading opera companies. Based in the iconic Covent Garden theatre, it is renowned for its outstanding performances of both traditional opera as well as commissioning new works by today’s leading opera composers such as Harrison Birtwistle, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Thomas Ades. Some of the most famous singers of all time have performed with the Company including Plácido Domingo, Angela Gheorghiu, Anna Netrebko, Renée Fleming, Bryn Terfel, Jonas Kaufman, Rolando Villazón, Juan Diego Flórez, as well as the late Luciano Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland. The Royal Ballet, led by Director Kevin O’Hare, is Britain’s largest ballet company. The Company has a wide-ranging repertory showcasing the great classical ballets, heritage works from Founder Choreographer Frederick Ashton and Principal Choreographer Kenneth MacMillan, as well as new works by the foremost choreographers of today. Access is a key issue for the Company and its work is seen not just at the Royal Opera House but via televised and cinematic performances, outdoor Big Screen performances, international touring and through the work of the Company’s Education Department.

The Punch and Judy - real page covent garden
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
40 The Market Covent Garden Piazza
London, WC2E 8RF

0207 379 0923

The Punch & Judy is a traditional British pub in Covent Garden Piazza serving great cask ales and freshly cooked traditional pub food

Southbank Centre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, SE1 8XX

20-74012636

Hello, and welcome to the official Southbank Centre Facebook page. Keep up to date with our latest news, forthcoming events and festivals and please feel free to comment and review as we love to hear what you think. Southbank Centre includes: › Royal Festival Hall › Hayward Gallery › Queen Elizabeth Hall › Purcell Room › Saison Poetry Library

National Portrait Gallery
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2 St Martin's Place
London, WC2H 0

+44(0)20 7306 0055

Covent Garden & Picadilly Circus
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Covent Garden
London, WC2H 0

London Trafalgar Square
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square, Westminster, London
London, WC2N 5DN

Royal Courts of Justice
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1

020 79476000

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. Designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics. The nearest London Underground stations are Chancery Lane and Temple.The courts within the building are open to the public, although there may be some restrictions depending upon the nature of the cases being heard. Those in court who do not have legal representation may receive some assistance within the building. There is a citizens' advice bureau based within the Main Hall which provides free, confidential and impartial advice by appointment to anyone who is a litigant in person in the courts. There is also a Personal Support Unit where litigants in person can receive emotional support and practical information about court proceedings.

Bateaux London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Embankment Pier, Victoria Embankment
London, WC2N 6NU

0207 695 1800

Bateaux London is the capital's best restaurant cruise. We offer Lunch, Afternoon Tea, Dinner and Sunday Lunch Cruises as well as options for groups, Private Dining and Exclusive Hire of our vessels. www.bateauxlondon.com

Shaftesbury Theatre
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
cyberjaya
London, WC2H 8DP

The Shaftesbury Theatre is a West End Theatre, located on Shaftesbury Avenue, in the London Borough of Camden.HistoryThe theatre was designed for the brothers Walter and Frederick Melville by Bertie Crewe and opened on 26 December 1911 with a production of The Three Musketeers, as the New Prince's Theatre, becoming the Prince's Theatre in 1914. It had a capacity of 2,392 and a stage 31' 10" wide by 31' deep.The Prince's was the last theatre to be built in Shaftesbury Avenue, and is located near New Oxford Street, perhaps explaining the many gaps between performances in its early years. It had considerable success with an 18-week season of Gilbert and Sullivan operas, presented by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, in 1919. These became a regular attraction at the theatre in the 1920s, interspersed with runs of theatre productions transferred from other venues. Basil Rathbone appeared at the Prince's Theatre in May 1933 when he played Julian Beauclerc in a revival of Diplomacy. The Rose of Persia was revived at the theatre in 1935. The D'Oyly Carte returned in 1942.The theatre was sold to EMI in 1962, and became the Shaftesbury Theatre the following year. Broadway productions that transferred to the theatre for long runs in the 1960s included Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1962)and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1963).

La Soirée
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Leicester Square
London,

Impossible to define and impossible to resist, LA SOIRÉE is an ever-changing collection of some of the most outrageous, hilarious, beautiful and downright bizarre acts you will ever see. With its edgy fusion of cabaret, new burlesque, circus sideshow and contemporary vaudeville, LA SOIRÉE offers audiences the kind of entertainment it has not seen for years.

Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
River Thames
London, SE1 8

0870 500 0600

The Hungerford Bridge crosses the River Thames in London, and lies between Waterloo Bridge and Westminster Bridge. It is a steel truss railway bridge – sometimes known as the Charing Cross Bridge – flanked by two more recent, cable-stayed, pedestrian bridges that share the railway bridge's foundation piers, and which are named the Golden Jubilee Bridges.The north end of the bridge is Charing Cross railway station, and is near Embankment Pier and the Victoria Embankment. The south end is near Waterloo station, County Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, and the London Eye. Each pedestrian bridge has steps and lift access.

The Courtauld Gallery
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
150 Strand
London, WC2R 0RN

+44 (0)20 7848 2526

Discover our world-famous collection of paintings, drawings and decorative arts. Ranging from the Middle Ages to the 20th century the collection is displayed in the elegant surroundings of Somerset House. The Courtauld is best known for its outstanding Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, including celebrated works by Monet, Renoir, Degas and Gauguin as well as a major group of paintings by Cézanne. Visitors can enjoy iconic masteries such as Manet's 'A Bar at the Folies-Bergère' and Van Gogh's 'Self-Portrait with Badaged Ear.'

Hunterian Museum, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Royal College of Surgeons, 35- 43 Lincoln's Inn Fields
London, WC2A 3PE

020 78696560

John Hunter's collection was purchased by the government in 1799, and given to the Company (later The Royal College) of Surgeons. The collection formed the basis for a museum constructed as part of the new Royal College of Surgeons of London's building on the south side of Lincoln's Inn Fields. _____________ Hire the Hunterian: In the evening this fantastic space can be hired for your private event. Ideal for drinks receptions, pre-dinner drinks and canapés, or an intimate networking event; the Hunterian Museum will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for your guests. For further information, please call the events team on 020 7869 6702 and quote FB13 for 15% off your first event.

Cleopatra's Needle
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Thames Embankment
London, WC2N 6

020 7234 5800

Festival of Love Southbank
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Belvedere Road
London, SE1 8XX

Golden Jubilee Bridges
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London,

Abbey Road Studios
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
3 Abbey Road
London, NW8 9AY

020 7266 7000

HMS President
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London, EC4Y 0HJ

HMS Saxifrage was launched in 1918 as a Flower-class anti-submarine Q-ship. She was renamed HMS President in 1922 and moored permanently on the Thames as a Royal Navy Reserve drill ship. In 1982 she was sold to private owners, and having changed hands twice, now serves as a venue for conferences and functions, and serves as the offices for a number of media companies. Technically, she is now called HMS President (1918) to distinguish her from HMS President, the Royal Naval Reserve base in St Katharine Docks. She is one of the last three surviving Royal Navy warships of the First World War. She is also the sole representative of the first type of purpose built anti-submarine vessels, and is the ancestor of WW2 convoy escort sloops, which evolved into modern anti-submarine frigates.Design and constructionThe original Flower-class sloops (the Acacia, Azalea and Arabis classes) were all built in 1915 as fleet minesweeping vessels, with triple hulls at the bow to give extra protection against loss from mine damage. When submarine attacks on British merchant ships became a serious menace after 1916, the existing Flowers were transferred to convoy escort duty, and fitted with depth charges as well as 4.7-inch naval guns.

Southbank Christmas Market
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road
London, SE1 8XX

Bb Bakery Afternoon Tea Bus
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 Northumberland Avenue
London, WC2N 5BY

Westminster Embankment
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Victoria Embankment
London,

Museum of Comedy
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
The Undercroft, St Georges Church, Bloomsbury Way
London, WC1A 2SR

020 7534 1744

Founded by Leicester Square Theatre director Martin Witts, the Museum of Comedy is a brand new, immersive museum and performance venue, featuring iconic props and artefacts from our rich comedic history and housing one of the most comprehensive collections of Comedy memorabilia ever to be amassed in one place. The museum has been lovingly put together by Martin from his collection of over six thousand artefacts and print from some the most iconic comedians and comedy shows both past and present, amassed during his career spanning over three decades in the comedy industry. See comic artefacts from Tommy Cooper’s handmade magic props to Steptoe and Son’s stuffed bear! Plus Leicester Square Theatre favourite Bill Bailey’s iconic 6-neck guitar. Accompanying the collection will be revolving exhibitions, currently Steve Ullathorne’s stylish and contemporary images of current comedy stars The Comic Collection. Museum facilities include The Cooper Room, a state of the art traditional performance space hosting all kinds of comedy performance, from theatre and stand up to silent film. The Museum is also home to The Comedy Academy, an educational facility for comedy writing performance and production. The Museum of Comedy. Shining a light on the stars of British comedy. See What's On: http://bit.ly/25WAU79 @museumofcomedy www.museumofcomedy.com

Summer Set House
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1LA

+442078454600

HMS Wellington
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Temple Stairs Victoria Embankment
London, WC2R 2PN

020 7836 8179

HMS Wellington is a sloop, formerly of the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, she served as a convoy escort ship in the North Atlantic. She is now moored alongside the Victoria Embankment, at Temple Pier, on the River Thames in London, England, as the headquarters ship of the Honourable Company of Master Mariners, where she is known as HQS Wellington. It was always the ambition of the founding members of the company to have a livery hall. Up to the outbreak of war in 1939, various proposals were examined, including the purchase of a sailing ship,.After the Second World War, it became apparent that the possibility of building a hall in the City of London had been rendered very remote. In 1947, the Grimsby-class sloop Wellington was made available by the Admiralty. The company decided to buy her with money subscribed by the members and convert her to a floating livery hall, an appropriate home for a company of seafarers.

Kings Road, Chelsea
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
69 brothel mansions kings rs
London,

Prince Henry's Room
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
17 Fleet St
London, EC4Y 1AA

020 7353 1190

Prince Henry's Room is situated on the first floor at the front of No.17 Fleet Street, London. The house is one of the few surviving buildings in the City of London dating from before the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is a Grade II* Listed Building.HistoryThe site was once owned by the Templars, but after the dissolution of the Order of St John, the building was rebuilt in 1610 and became a tavern called Prince's Arms. This coincided with the investiture of Prince Henry, son of James I, as Prince of Wales. During the 17th century, the house was known as the Fountain Inn and was visited by Samuel Pepys on 14 October 1661. He wrote "In the afternoon Captain Ferrers and I walked abroad to several places; among others, to Mr.Pim's my Lord's tailors and there he went out with us to the Fountain tavern and did give us store of wine." On 28 November 1661, Pepys wrote "to the Fountain tavern and there stayed till 12 at night, drinking and singing, Mr.Symons and one Mr.Agar singing very well. Then Mr.Gauden, being almost drunk, had the wit to be gone; and so I took leave too" During the early 19th century a famous exhibition "Mrs Salmon's Waxworks" was held in the front part of the house, whilst the Tavern continued in the rear. The house became the property of the London County Council in 1908 with the aid of a contribution from the City Corporation. It later passed to the City of London Corporation, which administers the property now.

Brit Movie Tours
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Brit Movie Tours, Golden Cross House, 8 Duncannon Street,
London, WC2N 4

0844 2471 007

Group Line
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
2nd Floor, 39-41 Charing Cross Road
London, WC2H 0AR

020 7206 1174

Group Line is the leading independent Groups ticketing agency. Our friendly and experienced team are dedicated to helping you organise your theatre trip. • Book Now, Pay Later! • Competitive Group Rates • West End Theatre, Packages & Exhibitions For Groups • Friendly, expert advice, every step of the way

Attractions/Things to Do Near Somerset House

Steph Sinclaire
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Strand, Charing Cross, London E1W3ST
London, United Kingdom E1W3ST

+44 20 7839 7282

Christmas Market at Tate Modern
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Tate Modern
London, United Kingdom SE1 9TG

0044 208 310 2542

Authentic German Christmas Market - Offering a large variety of gifts, treats, food, wine and cider. Perfect for everyone, young and old. Come and celebrate the festive period with us at our new site, The Tate Modern. How to get to our Christmas Market - By Tube The nearest London Underground stations to Tate Modern are: Southwark (Jubilee Line, 600 metres approx.) Blackfriars (District and Circle Line, 800 metres approx.) has now been reopened St Pauls (Central Line, 1,100 metres approx.) By bus The following buses stop near Tate Modern: Routes 45, 63 and 100 stop on Blackfriars Bridge Road Routes RV1 and 381 stop on Southwark Street Route 344 stops on Southwark Bridge Road By train The nearest mainline train stations to Tate Modern are: Blackfriars (800 metres approx.) London Bridge (1,100 metres approx.) There are no parking facilities so we do recommend to use public transport for your visit. http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/access-and-facilities/disabled-visitors

Angry Bird
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8/9 Holborn London, EC1N 2LL, London, GB.
London, United Kingdom EC1N 2LL

00442078232303

Angry Birds is a strategy puzzle video game developed by Finnish computer game developer Rovio Mobile. Inspired primarily by a sketch of stylized wingless birds, the game was first released for Apple's iOS in December 2009.[3] Since that time, over 12 million copies of the game have been purchased from Apple's App Store,[4] which has prompted the company to design versions for other touchscreen-based smartphones, such as those using the Android operating system, among others. The game is also available on HP App Catalog.

Shrek's Adventure
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Westminster Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7P

0871 221 2837

Play your part in 10 fairytale themed shows including a magical 4D flying bus ride brought to you by DreamWorks Tours! There’s breath-taking animation, captivating story-telling and bonkers characters PLUS unexpected surprises, smells and smiles from Shrek® and all his DreamWorks® pals as they bring Far Far Away closer than ever before in London’s newest family attraction! Shrek's Adventure! London is a one of a kind, world first attraction and during your adventure you’ll meet many characters (princesses and donkeys included), but as in all fairytales you may also encounter a witch or two, which some of our younger audience may find scary! Whilst there’s no age limit, we recommend Shrek's Adventure! London for children aged 6-12 (and for those younger knights and princesses feeling especially brave). We have a 4D magical bus ride, driven by none other than the mischievous Donkey! There is a minimum height restriction of 0.9 metres. Rumpelstiltskin is too short. Guests between 0.9 metres and 1.3 metres must be accompanied by an adult on the ride. Full ride restrictions can be found here - https://www.shreksadventure.com/london/visitor-info/helpful-information-guide/ Shrek's Adventure! London lasts for approximately 1 hour and 15 fairy-tale minutes!

SEA LIFE London Aquarium™
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
SEA LIFE London Aquarium, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Road
London, United Kingdom SE1 7PB

+44 (0)871 663 1678