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St. Paul's Cathedral, London | Tourist Information


st paul's churchyard
London, United Kingdom EC4M 8AD

Visits enquiries: 020 7246 8350

Anglican Church Near St. Paul's Cathedral

Westminster Abbey, London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Broad Sanctuary
London, SW1P 3PA

020 7222 5152

St George the Martyr Southwark
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Borough High Street London, Greater London SE1 1J
London, SE1 1JL

020 7357 7331

St George the Martyr is a church in the historic Borough district of south London. It lies within the modern day London Borough of Southwark on Borough High Street at the junction with Long Lane, Marshalsea Road, and Tabard Street. St George the Martyr is named after Saint George. The church is a Grade II* listed building.The church has strong associations with Charles Dickens, whose father was imprisoned for debt in the Marshalsea prison. The surviving wall of the prison adjoins the north side of the churchyard. Dickens himself lived nearby, in Lant Street, lodging in a house that belonged to the Vestry Clerk of St George's. This was during the darkest period of his life when, as a teenager, with his father in prison, he had to work in the 'blacking factory', and his literary career must have seemed an impossible dream. Later, he was to set several scenes of the novel Little Dorrit in and around St George's Church. There is a small representation of Little Dorrit in the east window of the church.It is also a recognised church of the City of London Company of Parish Clerks and the guild church of the Guildable Manor. From 2008 the annual Southwark Quit Rents ceremony, before the Queen's Remembrancer has taken place there.

Southwark Cathedral
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
London Bridge
London, SE1 9DA

+44 20 7367 6700

Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for more than 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since the creation of the diocese of Southwark in 1905.Between 1106 and 1538 it was the church of an Augustinian priory, Southwark Priory, dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Following the dissolution of the monasteries, it became a parish church, with the new dedication of St Saviour's. The church was in the diocese of Winchester until 1877, when the parish of St Saviour's, along with other South London parishes, was transferred to the diocese of Rochester. The present building retains the basic form of the Gothic structure built between 1220 and 1420, although the nave is a late 19th-century reconstruction.HistoryLegendary originsThe 16th-century London historian John Stow recorded an account of the origins of the Southwark Priory of St Mary that he had heard from Bartholomew Linsted, who had been the last prior when the priory was dissolved. Linsted claimed it had been founded as a nunnery "long before the Conquest" by a maiden named Mary, on the profits of a ferry across the Thames she had inherited from her parents. Later it was converted into a college of priests by "Swithen, a noble lady". Finally in 1106 it was refounded as an Augustinian priory.

Anglican Diocese of Southwark
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Trinity House, 4 Chapel Court, Borough High Street
London, SE1 1HW

020 7939 9400

The Diocese of Southwark is one of the 42 dioceses of the Church of England, part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The diocese forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. It was created on 1 May 1905 from part of the ancient Diocese of Rochester that was served by a Suffragan Bishop of Southwark (1891–1905). Before 1877 the area was part of the Diocese of Winchester.The diocese covers Greater London south of the River Thames (except for the London Borough of Bexley and London Borough of Bromley) and east Surrey. Since the creation of the episcopal area scheme in 1991, the diocese is divided into three episcopal areas each of which contains two archdeaconries: Croydon Episcopal Area (overseen by the area Bishop of Croydon)Archdeaconry of Croydonincludes Deaneries of Croydon Addington, Croydon Central, Croydon North, Croydon South, and Suttonincludes Deaneries of Caterham, Godstone, and ReigateArchdeaconry of Lambethincludes Deaneries of Brixton, Clapham, Lambeth North, Lambeth South, Streatham, and Mertonincludes Deaneries of Battersea, Kingston, Richmond and Barnes, Tooting, and WandsworthArchdeaconry of Lewisham & Greenwichincludes Deaneries of Charlton, Deptford, East Lewisham, Eltham and Mottingham, Plumstead, and West Lewishamincludes Deaneries of Bermondsey, Camberwell, Dulwich, and Southwark and Newington In other ecclesiastical use, although having lost religious orders in the English Reformation, the diocese has the London home of the Archbishop of Canterbury and records centre of the Church of England in the diocese, Lambeth Palace.

St Magnus-the-Martyr
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Lower Thames Street EC3R 6DN
London, EC3R 6DN

+44 20 7626 4481

St Magnus the Martyr, London Bridge is a Church of England church and parish within the City of London. The church, which is located in Lower Thames Street near The Monument to the Great Fire of London, is part of the Diocese of London and under the pastoral care of the Bishop of London and the Bishop of Fulham. It is a Grade I listed building. The rector uses the title "Cardinal Rector", being one of three clerics in the Church of England to use the title Cardinal.St Magnus lies on the original alignment of London Bridge between the City and Southwark. The ancient parish was united with that of St Margaret, New Fish Street, in 1670 and with that of St Michael, Crooked Lane, in 1831. The three united parishes retained separate vestries and churchwardens. Parish clerks continue to be appointed for each of the three parishes.St Magnus is the guild church of the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers and the Worshipful Company of Plumbers, and the ward church of the Ward of Bridge and Bridge Without. It is also twinned with the Church of the Resurrection in New York City.

St James Garlickhythe
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Garlick Hill
London, EC4V 2AL

+44 20 7236 1719

St. James Garlickhythe is a Church of England parish church in Vintry ward of the City of London, nicknamed ‘Wren’s lantern’ owing to its profusion of windows. Recorded since the 12th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. It is also the official church of eleven City livery companies.HistoryThe church is dedicated to the disciple St James known as ‘the Great’. St. James Garlickhythe is a stop on a pilgrim’s route ending at the cathedral of Santiago da Compostela. Visitors to the London church may have their credencial, or pilgrim passport, stamped with the impression of a scallop shell.'Garlickhythe' refers to the nearby landing place, or "hythe", near which garlic was sold in medieval times.The earliest surviving reference to the church is as ‘ecclesiam Sancti Jacobi’ in a 12th-century will. Other records of the church refer to it as ‘St James in the Vintry’, ‘St James Comyns’, ‘St James-by-the-Thames’ and ‘St James super Ripam’.The ships from France loaded with garlic also carried wine and St James has a long association with wine merchants. The church is located in the city ward of Vintry and in 1326, the Sheriff of London and Vintner, Richard de Rothing, paid to have the church rebuilt. Another company with long associations with the church is the Joiners' Company, who trace their origins back to a religious guild founded in St James in 1375.

St James Garlickhythe
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Garlick Hill
London, EC4V 2AL

020 7329 3632

St Mary le Strand
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Strand
London, WC2R 1

+44 (0) 20 7836 3126

St Mary le Strand is a Church of England church at the eastern end of the Strand in the City of Westminster, London. It lies within the Deanery of Westminster (St Margaret) within the Diocese of London. The church stands on what is now a traffic island to the north of Somerset House, King's College London's Strand campus, and south of Bush House (now also part of King's College London). It is the official church of the Women's Royal Naval Service, and has a book of remembrance for members who have died in service. The nearest tube station is Temple, with the now-closed Aldwych station nearly opposite the church. It is known as one of the two 'Island Churches', the other being St Clement Danes.HistoryThe church is the second to have been called St Mary le Strand, the first having been situated a short distance to the south. The date of its foundation is unclear but it was mentioned in a judgment of 1222, when it was called the Church of the Innocents, or St Mary and the Innocents. It was pulled down in 1549 by Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset to make way for Somerset House. The parishioners were promised a new church, which was never built, forcing them to move to the nearby church of St Clement Danes and afterwards to the Savoy Chapel. The site now occupied by the modern church was formerly occupied by a great maypole which had been the scene of May Day festivities in the 16th and 17th century but was severely decayed by the early 18th century.

St Stephen's, Walbrook
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
38 Walbrook
London, EC4N 4

20-76269000

St Stephen Walbrook is a church in the City of London, part of the Church of England's Diocese of London. The present domed building was erected to the designs of Sir Christopher Wren following the destruction of its medieval predecessor in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is located in Walbrook, next to the Mansion House, and near to Bank and Monument Underground stations.Early historyThe original church of St Stephen stood on the west side of the Walbrook, a stream running southwards across the City of London from the City Wall near Moorfields to the Thames.The church was moved to its present site, on the east side of the Walbrook (later concealed in a culvert), in the 15th century. In 1429 Robert Chichely, acting as executor of will of the former Lord Mayor, Sir William Stondon, bought a piece of land on the east side of the Walbrook, and presented it to the parish. Several foundation stones were laid at a ceremony on 11 May 1429, and the church was consecrated ten years later, on 30 April 1439. At 125ft long and 67ft wide, it was considerably larger than the present building.The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It contained a memorial to the composer John Dunstaple. The wording of the epitaph had been recorded in the early 17th century, and was reinstated in the church in 1904, some 450 years after his death. The nearby church of St Benet Sherehog, also destroyed in the Great Fire, was not rebuilt; instead its parish was united with that of St Stephen.

St Mary Aldermary
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Watling St
London, EC4M 9BW

020 7248 9902

St Mary Aldermary is an Anglican church in Bow Lane in the City of London. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt from 1510. Badly damaged in the Great Fire of London in 1666, it was rebuilt once more, this time by Sir Christopher Wren, unlike the vast majority of his City churches in a Gothic style.HistoryThere has been a church on the site for over 900 years. Its name is usually taken to mean that it is the oldest of the City churches dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The patronage of the rectory of St Mary Aldermary belonged to the prior and chapter of Canterbury, but was transferred to the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1400.In 1510, Sir Henry Keeble financed the building of a new church. The tower was still unfinished when he died in 1518. In 1629, two legacies enabled it to be completed, and the work, begun 120 years before, was finished within three years. Keble was buried in a vault beneath the floor of church, but his grave was not allowed to remain for long. Richard Newcourt recorded that Sir William Laxton, who died in 1556, and Sir Tho. Lodge, who died in 1583 (both which were Grocers and had been Mayors of this City), were buried in the Vault of this Sir Henry Keeble, his bones unkindly cast out, and his Monument pull'd down, in place whereof, Monuments were set up of the others. John Stow mentions various dignitaries buried in the early church in his 1598 Survey of London. They include Richard Chaucer, vintner, said by Stow to be the father of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer. John Milton married his third wife, Elizabeth Minshull, in the church in 1663. The parish registers date from 1558, and are now deposited in the Guildhall Library.

St Clement Danes
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
The Strand
London, WC2R 1

020 7242 8282

St Clement Danes is an Anglican church in the City of Westminster, London. It is situated outside the Royal Courts of Justice on the Strand. Although the first church on the site was reputedly founded in the 9th century by the Danes, the current building was completed in 1682 by Sir Christopher Wren. Wren's building was gutted during the Blitz and not restored until 1958, when it was adapted to its current function as the central church of the Royal Air Force.The church is sometimes claimed to be the one featured in the nursery rhyme Oranges and Lemons and the bells do indeed play that tune. However, St Clement Eastcheap, in the City of London, also claims to be the church from the rhyme. St Clement Danes is known as one of the two 'Island Churches', the other being St Mary-le-Strand.

Old St Paul's Cathedral
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
St Paul's Churchyard
London, SW1W 0

Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built from 1087 to 1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill.Work on the cathedral began during the reign of William the Conqueror after a fire in 1087 that destroyed much of the city. Work took more than 200 years, and construction was delayed by another fire in 1135. The church was consecrated in 1240 and enlarged again in 1256 and the early 14th century. At its completion in the middle of the 14th century, the cathedral was one of the longest churches in the world and had one of the tallest spires and some of the finest stained glass.The presence of the shrine of Saint Erkenwald made the cathedral a pilgrimage site during the Medieval period. In addition to serving as the seat of the Diocese of London, the building developed a reputation as a hub of the City of London, with the nave aisle, "Paul's walk", known as a centre for business and the London grapevine. After the Reformation, the open-air pulpit in the churchyard, St Paul's Cross, became the stage for radical evangelical preaching and Protestant bookselling.

St Dunstan-in-the-West
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
186a Fleet St
London, EC4A 2

020 7405 1929

The Guild Church of St Dunstan-in-the-West is in Fleet Street in the City of London. It is dedicated to a former Bishop of London and Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is of medieval origin, although the present building, with an octagonal nave, was constructed in the 1830s to the designs of John Shaw.HistoryMedieval churchFirst founded between AD 988 and 1070, there is a possibility that a church on this site was one of the Lundenwic strand settlement churches, like St Martin in the Fields, the first St Mary le Strand, St Clement Danes and St Brides, which may pre-date any within the walls of the city. It is not known exactly when the original church was built, but it was possibly erected by Saint Dunstan himself, or priests who knew him well. It was first mentioned in written records in 1185. King Henry III gained possession of it and its endowments from Westminster Abbey by 1237 and then granted these and the advowson to the "House of Converts" i.e. of the converted Jews, which led to its neglect of its parochial responsibilities. The House of Converts was eventually transformed into the Court of the Master of the Rolls.William Tyndale, the celebrated translator of the Bible, was a lecturer at the church and sermons were given by the poet John Donne. Samuel Pepys mentions the church in his diary. The church narrowly escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666. The Dean of Westminster roused 40 scholars from Westminster School in the middle of the night, who formed a fire brigade which extinguished the flames with buckets of water to only three doors away.

St. Paul's tube station
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Cheapside
London, EC2V 6AA

+44 (0) 20 7222 1234

St. Paul's is a London Underground station located in the City of London financial district. The station, which takes its name from the nearby St Paul's Cathedral, is on the Central line, between Bank and Chancery Lane stations, and is in fare zone 1.It should not be confused with City Thameslink railway station which opened in 1990 with the name St. Paul's Thameslink, but is some distance from the Underground station. That station was subsequently renamed City Thameslink to avoid confusion for the emergency services, but for some years afterwards many maps and guidebooks in circulation continued to carry the earlier name.HistoryThe station was opened by the Central London Railway (CLR) on 30 July 1900 with the name Post Office, after the headquarters of the General Post Office on nearby St Martin's Le Grand. The name Post Office was possibly chosen instead of the more obvious St. Paul's to differentiate it from a South Eastern Railway (SER) station which already held that name (but which today is called Blackfriars).

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Holborn Viaduct
London, EC1A 2DQ

St Andrew Holborn
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
5 St Andrew Street
London, EC4A 3AF

020 7583 7394

St Andrew Holborn is - a place of prayer and encounter with God offering services every weekday - home to several charities who offer support and help to those in need - a busy and attractive events centre for meetings, conferences and hospitality WEEKLY SERVICES Monday 1.10pm Mass Tuesday 1.10pm Mass Wednesday 7pm Sung Mass Thursday 1.10pm Mass Friday 12.30pm Mass All are welcome.

St Bartholomew-the-Less
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Saint Bartholomew's Hospital, West Smithfield
London, EC1A 9LA

+44 20 7601 8066

St Bartholomew the Less is an Anglican parish in the City of London and the church of St Bartholomew's Hospital within the ancient hospital precincts.HistoryThe present establishment is the latest in a series of churches and chapels associated with the hospital over the past 800 years. Its earliest predecessor, known as the Chapel of the Holy Cross, was founded nearby in 1123 (at the same time as the priory, now the Priory Church of St Bartholomew the Great) before moving to the present site in 1184. Along with most other religious foundations the hospital was dissolved by Henry VIII. It was then refounded by King Henry VIII, when the chapel became an Anglican parish church serving those living within its precincts. Its suffix, "the less", was given to distinguish it from its larger neighbour, St Bartholomew the Great (the former priory).The church's tower and west façade date from 15th century, with two of its three bells dating from 1380 and 1420. They hang within an original medieval bell frame, believed to be the oldest in the City of London. In 1793 George Dance the Younger, a Royal Academician, created a new octagonal interior within the shell of the medieval chapel, its clerestorey rising above the old walls. The new construction was made entirely of wood and soon became affected by dry-rot. In 1823 it was replaced under the supervision of Thomas Hardwick, who replicated the timber construction in stone with an iron ceiling. He also made alterations to the detailing.

St Bartholomew the Great, West Smithfield
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
West Smithfield
London, EC1A 7JQ

020 7600 0440

Saint Bartholomew the Great is one of London's oldest churches. It was founded in 1123 as an Augustinian Priory and has been in continuous use as a place of worship since at least 1143. It is an active Anglican/Episcopal Church in that part of London known as the City. The Smithfield area, which includes St Bartholomew's Hospital and Smithfield Market, is popular because of the large number of restaurants, bars and pubs both north and south of the Market. At the heart of it all is a church built when Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, was King of England. It survived the Great Fire of 1666 and the bombs dropped in Zeppelin raids in World War I and during the Blitz in World War II. Today the Church has a reputation not only for wonderful architecture, but also for traditional formal worship, marvellous music and intelligent preaching. It has also appeared in a series of award-winning films including Four Weddings and a Funeral, Shakespeare in Love, The End of the Affair, Amazing Grace, Elizabeth: The Golden Age, and The Other Boleyn Girl. It has also appeared in a number of television programmes including Madame Bovary, The Real Sherlock Holmes, Spooks, and The League of Gentlemen Christmas Special. The Reverend Martin Dudley BD MSc MTh PhD FSA FRHistS AKC is the 25th Rector of the Priory Church since the Reformation

St Giles-without-Cripplegate
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
Fore Street, Barbican, London
London, EC2 8DA

St Giles-without-Cripplegate is a Church of England church in the City of London, located on Fore Street within the modern Barbican complex. When built it stood without (that is, outside) the city wall, near the Cripplegate. The church is dedicated to St Giles, patron saint of beggars and the handicapped. It is one of the few medieval churches left in the City of London, having survived the Great Fire of 1666.HistoryThere had been a Saxon church on the site in the 11th century but by 1090 it had been replaced by a Norman one. In 1394 it was rebuilt in the perpendicular gothic style. The stone tower was added in 1682.The church has been badly damaged by fire on three occasions: In 1545, in 1897 and during an air raid of the Blitz of the Second World War on the night of 24 August 1940. German bombs completely gutted the church but it was restored using the plans of the reconstruction of 1545. A new ring of twelve bells was cast by Mears and Stainbank in 1954, and this was augmented with a sharp second bell cast in 2006 by the Whitechapel Bell Foundry.

St Albans Church Holborn
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
18 Brooke Street, London
London, EC1N 7RD

020 7405 1831

Religious Organization Near St. Paul's Cathedral

School of Faith
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
82 Union Street
London, United Kingdom EN5 4HZ

Knockturn Alley Mission
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
12 Knockturn Alley
London, United Kingdom W11 2BQ

44 20 7437 4370

Jade Agatha
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
107 Queen Victoria St
London, United Kingdom EC4 3AL

+44 20 7489 0291

The Salvation Army
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
101 Queen Victoria Street
London, United Kingdom EC4V 4HG

We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments were given by inspiration of God, and that they only constitute the Divine rule of Christian faith and practice. We believe that there is only one God, who is infinitely perfect, the Creator, Preserver, and Governor of all things, and who is the only proper object of religious worship. We believe that there are three persons in the Godhead - the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, undivided in essence and co-equal in power and glory. We believe that in the person of Jesus Christ the Divine and human natures are united, so that He is truly and properly God and truly and properly man. We believe that our first parents were created in a state of innocency, but by their disobedience, they lost their purity and happiness, and that in consequence of their fall, all men have become sinners, totally depraved, and as such are justly exposed to the wrath of God. We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ has by His suffering and death made an atonement for the whole world so that whosoever will may be saved. We believe that repentance toward God, faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and regeneration by the Holy Spirit are necessary to salvation. We believe that we are justified by grace through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and that he that believeth hath the witness in himself. We believe that continuance in a state of salvation depends upon continued obedient faith in Christ. We believe that it is the privilege of all believers to be wholly sanctified, and that their whole spirit and soul and body may be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. We believe in the immortality of the soul, the resurrection of the body, in the general judgement at the end of the world, in the eternal happiness of the righteous, and in the endless punishment of the wicked.

St Sepulchre
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Holborn Viaduct
London, United Kingdom EC1A 2DQ

020 7236 1145

SA Gemeente Londen
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
49 - 51 Shoe Lane
London, United Kingdom EC4A 3BL

+44 (0) 207 353 6124

St Bartholomew the Great, West Smithfield
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
West Smithfield
London, United Kingdom EC1A 7JQ

020 7600 0440

Saint Bartholomew the Great is one of London's oldest churches. It was founded in 1123 as an Augustinian Priory and has been in continuous use as a place of worship since at least 1143. It is an active Anglican/Episcopal Church in that part of London known as the City. The Smithfield area, which includes St Bartholomew's Hospital and Smithfield Market, is popular because of the large number of restaurants, bars and pubs both north and south of the Market. At the heart of it all is a church built when Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, was King of England. It survived the Great Fire of 1666 and the bombs dropped in Zeppelin raids in World War I and during the Blitz in World War II. Today the Church has a reputation not only for wonderful architecture, but also for traditional formal worship, marvellous music and intelligent preaching. It has also appeared in a series of award-winning films including Four Weddings and a Funeral, Shakespeare in Love, The End of the Affair, Amazing Grace, Elizabeth: The Golden Age, and The Other Boleyn Girl. It has also appeared in a number of television programmes including Madame Bovary, The Real Sherlock Holmes, Spooks, and The League of Gentlemen Christmas Special. The Reverend Martin Dudley BD MSc MTh PhD FSA FRHistS AKC is the 25th Rector of the Priory Church since the Reformation