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The Sherlock Holmes Museum, City of Westminster | Tourist Information


sherlock-holmes.co.uk

221B Baker Street
City of Westminster, United Kingdom NW1

0207 224 3688

Arts and Entertainment Near The Sherlock Holmes Museum

229 The Venue
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
229 Great Portland Street
London, United Kingdom WC1X 8BZ

+44 (0)20 7631 8379

The Marylebone
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
93 Marylebone High Street
London, United Kingdom W1G 8NX

+442079354373

Whether you fancy a Wednesday night cocktail, lunchtime glass of wine or early evening pint, The Marylebone has it all. A carefully selected cocktail list, variety of home-made infusions and hand-picked wine selection make the 'go to' venue in this part of town.

Pontefract Castle
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
71 Wigmore St
London, United Kingdom W1U 1

020 7935 8034

Baker Street London
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
baker street, london
London, United Kingdom

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The Golden Hind
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
73 Marylebone Lane
London, United Kingdom W1U 2PN

+44 (0) 20 7486 3644

Il Bottaccio London
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
4 Mandeville Place, Mayfair
London, United Kingdom W1U 2BG

020 7235 9522

Il Bottaccio is a leading international event production, catering and entertainment company headquartered in London. From large scale corporate events, fashion shows and state of the art product launches, to intimate birthday parties and elegant weddings — our outstanding team boasts over 30 years of experience in providing professional planning services and delivering truly unforgettable memories. Always striving to challenge the boundaries of what is possible, with remarkable attention to details and impeccable taste — from Shanghai to New York, to Istanbul to Rome, your Dream is the limit when it comes to what the team at Il Bottaccio can create.

The Hellenic Centre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
16-18 Paddington Street, Marylebone
London, United Kingdom W1U 5AS

02074875060

The London conference venue offers a programme of exhibitions, lectures, concerts and cultural events and Greek language courses.

Rudolf Steiner House
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
35 Park Rd
London, United Kingdom NW1 6XT

+44 (0) 20 7723 4400

Cavendish Conference Centre
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
22 Duchess Mews
London, United Kingdom W1G 9DY

+44 (0)20 7706 7700

The Potting Shed
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
39-40 Dorset Square
London, United Kingdom NW1 6

20-75350709

Tiger Tiger Croydon
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
11
London, United Kingdom sw87yh

07987765453

32 Marbel Arch, Hyde Park, london., W2 2BP
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
32 Marbel Arch
London, United Kingdom

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Bickenhall Mansions
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
london
London, United Kingdom

00218914099902

Marylebone Summer Fayre
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
77-79 Marylebone High St
London, United Kingdom

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Barracuda Club
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
8 The Mall
London, United Kingdom

Madame Tussauds
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
Baker St
London, United Kingdom

ETX Entertainment
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
6 Dorset Square
London, United Kingdom NW1 6QA

07515362313

Sportsman Casino
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
Old Quebec St
London, United Kingdom W1H 7

20-74140061

Future Publishing
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
99 Baker St
London, United Kingdom W1U 6LW

020 7317 2600

Air-Edel Associates Ltd
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
18 Rodmarton Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 8BJ

020 7486 6466

Air-Edel offers full music supervision and production services for feature film, television, commercials and video game projects. Working closely with the composer, director, producer, musicians & artists, we can handle all aspects of music production including: -creative briefing -budgeting -booking of all musicians -score supervision -in house recording studios -copyright clearance -contract negotiations -music publishing A production company can use any or all of our expertise to create their very own "music department", on a project by project basis. Whether it's music for a micro budget indie film or the Oscar winning triumph of Dario Marianelli's score for Atonement, we always bring the same level of passion and expertise to the project.

Museum Near The Sherlock Holmes Museum

Madame Tussauds London
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LR
London, United Kingdom NW1 4

0871 894 3000

Wellcome Collection
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
183 Euston Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 2BE

020 7611 2222

221b Baker Street
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6XE

The Wallace Collection
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

020 7563 9500

Royal Academy of Music
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5HT

020 7873 7373

Since 1822 the Royal Academy of Music has prepared students for successful careers in music according to the constantly evolving demands of the profession. Academy musicians study instrumental performance, composition, jazz, musical theatre and opera. The Academy’s student community is truly international, with over 50 countries represented. As the Academy approaches its bicentenary it goes from strength to strength. In the past three years alone, the Academy has been rated the best conservatoire for research by the Times Higher, the top conservatoire and the second-highest rated institution in the country for student satisfaction in the National Student Survey, and top conservatoire in The Times University Guide. The Academy's Alumni Network provides all former students of the Royal Academy of Music with a wide-ranging professional support service and social network.

221B Baker Street
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
221B Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6X

+44(0) 20 7224 3688

221B Baker Street is the London address of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, created by author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In the United Kingdom, postal addresses with a number followed by a letter may indicate a separate address within a larger, often residential building. Baker Street in Holmes' time was a high-class residential district, and Holmes' apartment was probably part of a Georgian terrace.At the time the Holmes stories were published, addresses in Baker Street did not go as high as 221. Baker Street was later extended, and in 1932 the Abbey National Building Society moved into premises at 219–229 Baker Street. For many years, Abbey National employed a full-time secretary to answer mail addressed to Sherlock Holmes. In 1990, a blue plaque signifying 221B Baker Street was installed at the Sherlock Holmes Museum, situated elsewhere on the same block, and there followed a 15-year dispute between Abbey National and the Holmes Museum for the right to receive mail addressed to 221B Baker Street. Since the closure of Abbey House in 2005, ownership of the address by the Holmes Museum has not been challenged, despite its location between 237 and 241 Baker Street.Conan Doyle's intentionsWe met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows.(Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet, 1887)

The Magic Circle
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
12 Stephenson Way
London, United Kingdom NW1 2HD

221B Sherlock Holmes - Baker Street
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
221b Baker Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 6XE

+442079358866

Maddame Tausads
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

+44 (0) 871 894 3000

Madame Tussauds
Distance: 0.1 mi Tourist Information
nw10
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

Madame Tussauds is a wax museum in London with branches in a number of major cities. It was founded by wax sculptor Marie Tussaud. It used to be known as "Madame Tussaud's"; the apostrophe is no longer used. Madame Tussauds is a major tourist attraction in London, displaying waxworks of famous people.HistoryBackgroundMarie Tussaud was born as Marie Grosholtz in 1761 in Strasbourg, France. Her mother worked as a housekeeper for Dr. Philippe Curtius in Bern, Switzerland, who was a physician skilled in wax modelling. Curtius taught Tussaud the art of wax modelling.Tussaud created her first wax sculpture in 1777 of Voltaire. Other famous people whom she modelled at that time include Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Benjamin Franklin. During the French Revolution, she modelled many prominent victims. She claims that she would search through corpses to find the severed heads of executed citizens, from which she would make death masks. Her death masks were held up as revolutionary flags and paraded through the streets of Paris.

221B Baker Street, London
Distance: 0.0 mi Tourist Information
221B Backer Street, London
London, United Kingdom NW1 6XE

3334567652

Sotheby's at New Bond Street
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
34-35 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom W1A 2AA

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Brunei Hall
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
35-43 Norfolk Square
London, United Kingdom W2 1

02074020953

Jewish Museum London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
129-131 Albert Street
London, United Kingdom NW1 7NB

020 7284 7384

The Jewish Museum London celebrates Jewish life and cultural diversity. Our education programmes and activities encourage a sense of discovery and creativity and tell the story of Jewish history, culture and religion in an innovative and compelling way and engage with people of all backgrounds and faiths to explore Jewish heritage and identity as part of the wider story of Britain. Twitter: www.twitter.com/JewishMuseumLDN Instagram: www.instagram.com/JewishMuseumLDN

Cats - the London Palladium
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Argyll Street, London W1F 7TF
London, United Kingdom

Jimi Hendrix's Flat, 23 Brook Street
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
Handel House Museum, 25 Brook Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4HB

+44 20 7495 1685

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
Malet Place
City of Westminster, United Kingdom WC1E 7

+44 (0) 20 7679 2884

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is part of University College London Museums & Collections. The museum contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material. It ranks behind only the collections of the Cairo Museum, The British Museum and the Ägyptisches Museum, Berlin in number and quality of items.HistoryThe museum was established as a teaching resource for the Department of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology at University College at the same time as the department was established in 1892. The initial collection was donated by the writer Amelia Edwards. The first Edwards Professor, William Matthew Flinders Petrie conducted many important excavations, and in 1913 he sold his collections of Egyptian antiquities to University College, transforming the museum into one of the leading collections outside Egypt. Petrie excavated dozens of major sites in the course of his career, including the Roman Period cemeteries at Hawara, famous for the beautiful mummy portraits in classical Roman style; Amarna, the city of king Akhenaten, known as the first king to believe in one God; and the first true pyramid, at Meydum, where he uncovered some of the earliest evidence for mummification.The collection and library were arranged in galleries within the university and a guidebook published in 1915. Initially, the collection's visitors were students and academics; it was not then open to the general public. Petrie retired from UCL in 1933, though his successors continued to add to the collections, excavating in other parts of Egypt and the Sudan. During the Second World War (1939–1945) the collection was packed up and moved out of London for safekeeping. In the early 1950s it was moved into a former stable, where it remains adjacent to the science library of UCL.

Pollock's Toy Museum
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Scala Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2HL

+44 (0) 20 7636 3452

Gagosian Gallery
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
20 Grosvenor Hill
London, United Kingdom W1K 3

+44 (0) 20 7493 3020

Pollock's Toy Museum
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
1 Scala Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 2

0207-636 3452

Pollock's Toy Museum is a small museum in London, England.It was started in 1956 in a single attic room at 44 Monmouth Street, near Covent Garden, above Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop, where Pollock's Toy Theatres were also sold. As the enterprise flourished, other rooms were taken over for the museum and the ground floor became a toyshop. By 1969 the collection had outgrown the Monmouth Street premises and Pollock's Toy Museum moved to 1 Scala Street, with a museum shop on the ground floor to contribute to its support. The museum continues today to be run by the grandson of the founder Marguerite Fawdry.

Museum/Art Gallery Near The Sherlock Holmes Museum

Serpentine Galleries
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Kensington Gardens
London, United Kingdom W2 3XA

+44 (0)20 7402 6075

The Serpentine Galleries are one of London’s best-loved galleries for modern and contemporary art. They attract up to 800,000 visitors in any one year and admission is free. In the grounds of the Galleries is a permanent work by artist and poet Ian Hamilton Finlay, dedicated to the Serpentine’s former Patron Diana, Princess of Wales. The work comprises eight benches, a tree-plaque, and a carved stone circle at the Gallery’s entrance. In September 2013, Serpentine Galleries opened its new space, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. This innovative arts venue for the 21st century is housed in the Grade II-listed building formerly known as The Magazine, situated in Kensington Gardens. In 2016 the Serpentine Pavilion programme expanded to include four Summer Houses in a group show of architecture in the built form. For the second year running the Serpentine, in association with Bloomberg Philanthropies, has opened the Build Your Own Pavilion Challenge, a competition for 8-14 year olds to design and enter their Pavilion models. For more information http://buildyourownpavilion.serpentinegalleries.org/ Getting here Serpentine Gallery Nearest tube stations: Lancaster Gate, Knightsbridge or South Kensington Main bus routes: 9, 10, 52, 94, 148 Serpentine Sackler Gallery Nearest tube stations: Lancaster Gate or Marble Arch Main bus routes: 148, 274, 390 94 Group visits The Serpentine welcomes school, university and community groups to the Galleries on Tuesday through Sunday for self-led visits. All groups must book in advance with the visitor services team. For further information regarding planning a group visit, please visit our group visits page. Parking for vehicles and bicycles There is metered car parking in Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park. There is dedicated cycle parking within the grounds of the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. There are Santander Cycles hire stations on West Carriage Drive near the Serpentine Sackler Gallery and on The Ring near the Serpentine Gallery. Dogs Dogs are not permitted inside the Serpentine Galleries or The Magazine restaurant. There are several dog rings outside the Serpentine Galleries for short visits. Guide dogs are permitted. Accessibility We have full disability access and facilities. Facilities – toilets/baby changing room The Serpentine Galleries have full disability access and facilities. There is a baby changing room located at each Gallery. Refreshments Kofler & Kompanie run a cafe at the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion has a selection of teas, coffees, sandwiches and cakes available daily 10am-6pm until 9 October 2016. The Magazine bar at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery offers visitors a selection of snack items, teas, coffees, cocktails and wine. Opening times vary on a daily basis. Call the bar on 020 7298 7552 for more information.

ICA
Distance: 1.7 mi Tourist Information
The Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5AH

020 7930 3647

Camden Arts Centre
Distance: 2.2 mi Tourist Information
Arkwright Rd
London, United Kingdom NW3 6DG

+44 (0)20 7472 5500

The year-round programme includes exhibitions, artist residencies, talks and events, school and artists’ projects, courses and off-site activities, ensuring Camden Arts Centre remains a dynamic place for seeing, making and talking about art. Exhibitions feature emerging artists, international artists showing for the first time in London, significant historic figures who have inspired contemporary practice, and artist selected group shows relevant to current debate. Residencies develop artists’ practices with practical support, resulting in new work and public participation. Projects are initiatives to encourage people of all ages, abilities and areas of interest to engage with contemporary art. Events engage audiences in a regular series of talks and discussions, film screenings and live art performances. Courses teach creative and technical skills to people of all ages and abilities, in a range of specialist mediums. A specialist Bookshop is on site, as well as a Café and Garden which is open all year round. Camden Arts Centre is a registered charity. Registered Charity Number 1065829

The Cartoon Museum
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
35 Little Russell Street
London, United Kingdom WC1A 2HH

02075808155

V&A Members' Room
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Victoria and Albert Museum
London, United Kingdom SW7 2RL

020 7942 2271

The Muse at 269 - Gallery / Studio
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
269 Portobello Road
London, United Kingdom W11 1LR

02077928588

The Muse gallery was established in 2003, in order to support emerging artists by combining creative and commercial elements under one roof. We inherited the building from the creators of 'Green & Blacks' to convert the town house into a mayhem of cultural, creative and commercial activities. We offer exhibition space for contemporary artists, whether established or emerging, accepted purely by merit of work. Throughout the year community arts projects, musicians, film makers and live performers are invited to submit proposals for workshops and events at No. 269, Portobello Road and collaborate with our modest team of artists to present to London. We also have a limited number of opportunities for gallery hire within our calendar.

Beaconsfield Gallery Vauxhall
Distance: 2.8 mi Tourist Information
22 Newport Street
London, United Kingdom SE11 6AY

0207 582 6465

Beaconsfield offers a space for artists and audiences to experience high quality (hence ‘beacon’), challenging, new artworks in a wide range (hence ‘field’) of contemporary visual art media through commissions, group exhibitions, performances, publications and events. Set up in 1994 the organisation is still run by its two artist-founder-directors – David Crawforth and Naomi Siderfin - who work collaboratively with the artists they commission from their base in the former Lambeth Ragged School in Vauxhall, central London. The venue retains its historical and architectural character. Beaconsfield believes that the arts should be a guardian of free speech, diversity of expression and democracy. It regards its work as contributing to this principle. The charity's artistic policy promotes dialogue locally, nationally and internationally and seeks to contribute to social and cultural integration. Beaconsfield recycles its waste, works on recycled paper and is probably the first and only arts organisation in London to be powered by 100% green electricity. Besides, it runs the Ragged Canteen, which serves ethically sourced seasonal dishes cooked to order, Cakehole London cakes, Monmouth coffee, fair trade teas and gluten-free selection - at affordable prices. Free Wi-fi, art magazines and week-end newspapers are provided. ‘Beaconsfield has a unique place in London’s cultural landscape. It is distinguished by its history of providing a forum for extraordinary events and exhibitions, stimulating passionate, candid and robust debate about art’s production and its ideological underpinnings, as well as providing a much-needed locus for the thriving artistic community in which it sits.’ Sheena Wagstaff, Chief Curator, Tate Modern

Michael Hoppen Gallery
Distance: 2.4 mi Tourist Information
3 Jubilee Place
London, United Kingdom SW3 3TD

+44 (0)20 73523649

The Michael Hoppen Gallery opened in 1992 and is founded on a passion for photography. As a gallery we are renowned for nurturing the careers of new and interesting artists and exhibiting them alongside acknowledged nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first century photographic masters. Spaced over three floors in the heart of Chelsea, London, we provide both a white-wall arena for our contemporary artists and a more intimate, book and wood lined context for the smaller and more eclectic works we exhibit... http://goo.gl/kiU6FH

Freud Museum
Distance: 1.9 mi Tourist Information
20 Maresfield Gardens
London, United Kingdom NW3 5SX

+44 (0)20 7435 2002

The Freud Museum in London is a museum dedicated to Sigmund Freud, who lived there with his family during the last year of his life. In 1938, after escaping Nazi annexation of Austria he came to London via Paris and stayed for a short while at 39 Elsworthy Road before moving to 20 Maresfield Gardens, where the museum is situated. Although he died a year later in the same house, his daughter Anna Freud continued to stay there until her death in 1982. It was her wish that after her death it be converted into a museum. It was opened to the public in July 1986.Freud continued to work in London and it was here that he completed his book Moses and Monotheism. He also maintained his practice in this home and saw a number of his patients for analysis. The centrepiece of the museum is the couch brought from Berggasse 19, Vienna on which his patients were asked to say whatever came to their mind without consciously selecting information, named the free association technique by him.There are two other Freud Museums, one in Vienna, and another in Příbor, the Czech Republic, in the house where Sigmund Freud was born. The latter was opened by president Václav Klaus and four of Freud's great-grandsons.Location and descriptionThe museum is located at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, one of London's suburbs.

Contemporary Ceramics
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
63 Great Russell Street
London, United Kingdom WC1B 3BF

0207 242 9644

Contemporary Ceramics Centre is a retail gallery showcasing the best of British studio ceramics. Situated opposite the British Museum, the gallery has an annual exhibition program featuring national and international artists. With a regularly changing display, it is always possible to see and buy a wide range of work from functional tableware to individual collector's pieces.

Somerset House Learning
Distance: 2.0 mi Tourist Information
Somerset House Trust, Somerset House,Strand
London, United Kingdom WC1R 1LA

02074209406 or 02078454690

Somerset House offers a range of creative learning opportunities for families, young people and adults. Inspired by the lively programme of events and exhibitions, year-round activities include practical workshops, talks and film screenings, and late studios with a blend of making, music and projections. Families can enjoy free regular drop-in workshops.

Gallery Elena Shchukina
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
10 Lees Place
London, United Kingdom W1K 6LL

020 7499 6019

From its base in Mayfair, Gallery Elena Shchukina brings emerging contemporary artists to London. London's art scene is the most vibrant in the world. Gallery Elena Shchukina is one of the most exciting contemporary art spaces in the city. Dedicated to international contemporary artists, most of whom have never before been exhibited in the UK, this superbly curated gallery has become a must-see location for international artists and their clients. The gallery recognises no international or artistic borders. We believe in choosing international contemporary artists, painters and sculptors, who display exceptional talent, technical skill and creativity, and in exhibiting them with empathy, comprehension and judgement. Through our carefully thought out programme, we deliver confident, engaging modern art exhibitions which are accessible to everyone. A lecture programme accompanies each exhibition - it is an opportunity not only to find out about the artist but also about the particular vision underlying the gallery itself. Elena's vision combines a love of the technique of creation coupled with a passionate interest in colour. These two aspects inform our exhibitions: our artists tend to have mastered a unique skill or have a particular talent that has not been shown before in the UK. Their use of colour is complex and emotionally engaging; the combination of skill and colour produces a synthesis that is essentially Elena Shchukina. Explore our most recent addition - the online shop! http://galleryelenashchukina.com/store/artists/

18 Stafford Terrace
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
18 Stafford Terrace
London, United Kingdom W8 7

020 7602 3316

18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844–1910) in Kensington, London. The house is currently open to the public as a museum.18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. It was Linley Sambourne who set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.LegacyLinley Sambourne died in 1910 but it wasn't until his wife Marion's death four years later that the house passed to their bachelor son Roy. Roy kept the house's interior largely unchanged until his own death in 1946. The house then passed to Roy's sister Maud Messel. Maud already had a large London residence therefore 18 Stafford remained mostly unoccupied and unchanged. In the years leading up to Maud's death in 1960, the house had become increasingly fascinating to her daughter Anne, Countess of Rosse. This fascination led to Anne proposing the foundation of The Victorian Society in 1957, and in turn the continued preservation of the house largely as it had been lived in by Linley.Lady Rosse negotiated the sale of the house to the Greater London Council and the lease to the Victorian Society in 1980; the house was then opened to the public as a museum which included the furniture, art, and decorative schemes retained from its original inhabitants, Linley Sambourne and his household. Following the demise of the Greater London Council the ownership of the house transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1989. The Royal Borough continued to work with the Victorian Society until 2000, when the lease to the Victorian Society wasn't renewed.

Box Galleries
Distance: 2.9 mi Tourist Information
402 Kings Road
London, United Kingdom SW10 0LJ

07786 033180

Multiplied
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
Christie's South Kensington, 85 Old Brompton Road
London, United Kingdom SW7 3LD

+44 (0)20 7930 6074

The fourth edition of the contemporary art in editions fair, Multiplied, returns to Christie's South Kensington this October. Christie's is pleased to announce forty-one international contemporary galleries will be participating, in what continues to be the UK's only contemporary print fair. Once again the salerooms in South Kensington will be transformed during Frieze week. The fair will be open to the public with free admission from 18-21 October 2013. http://www.multipliedartfair.com

Prince Henry's Room
Distance: 2.1 mi Tourist Information
17 Fleet St
London, United Kingdom EC4Y 1AA

020 7353 1190

Prince Henry's Room is situated on the first floor at the front of No.17 Fleet Street, London. The house is one of the few surviving buildings in the City of London dating from before the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is a Grade II* Listed Building.HistoryThe site was once owned by the Templars, but after the dissolution of the Order of St John, the building was rebuilt in 1610 and became a tavern called Prince's Arms. This coincided with the investiture of Prince Henry, son of James I, as Prince of Wales. During the 17th century, the house was known as the Fountain Inn and was visited by Samuel Pepys on 14 October 1661. He wrote "In the afternoon Captain Ferrers and I walked abroad to several places; among others, to Mr.Pim's my Lord's tailors and there he went out with us to the Fountain tavern and did give us store of wine." On 28 November 1661, Pepys wrote "to the Fountain tavern and there stayed till 12 at night, drinking and singing, Mr.Symons and one Mr.Agar singing very well. Then Mr.Gauden, being almost drunk, had the wit to be gone; and so I took leave too" During the early 19th century a famous exhibition "Mrs Salmon's Waxworks" was held in the front part of the house, whilst the Tavern continued in the rear. The house became the property of the London County Council in 1908 with the aid of a contribution from the City Corporation. It later passed to the City of London Corporation, which administers the property now.

Chelsea space
Distance: 2.6 mi Tourist Information
16 John Islip Street
London, United Kingdom SW1P 4JU

0044(0)2075146983

CHELSEA space is a public exhibiting space where invited art and design professionals are encouraged to work on experimental curatorial projects that may not otherwise be realised. The programme is international and interdisciplinary covering art, design and popular culture. The emphasis is on curatorial experimentation, the exposure of process and ideas, and re-readings of artworks and archives and their re-presentation for contemporary audiences. CHELSEA space is a platform for discussion and questions rather than definitive answers. The ethos at CHELSEA space is welcoming - a meeting place where informal social networks can develop. CHELSEA space is sited on the Millbank campus of Chelsea College of Arts, next to Tate Britain, and provides extra-curricular interest for the school and open access to the widest possible audiences. 2014 will see the introduction of the Exhibition Studio Workshop into CHELSEA space, which will show a changing selection of works and objects from the CHELSEA space, Chelsea College of Arts Library and Special Collections, in addition to the established exhibition programme. The Exhibition Studio Workshop is the practice-based strand of the new MA Curating and Collections postgraduate taught course which will give students the opportunity to work within the professional gallery environment. This unique workshop will engage students in live curatorial practice within a renowned public space.

Narrative Projects
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
110 New Cavendish Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 6XR

+ 44 (0) 20 7637 9715

The gallery’s primary objective is to open up a creative dialogue highlighting the wider cultural milieux within which our selected artists are working, and setting up provocative and enlightening juxtapositions and engagements between these and the London contemporary art scene through exhibitions and special off-site projects.

Philip Mould & Co.
Distance: 1.6 mi Tourist Information
18-19 Pall Mall
London, United Kingdom SW1Y 5LU

+44 (0) 20 7499 6818

Philip Mould & Company are a leading specialist dealer in British art and Old Masters. Our gallery is a new three-storied space in Pall Mall. We have a large selection of fine paintings for sale, from Tudor and Jacobean panel pictures to eighteenth-century landscapes, as well as works by Old Masters such as Titian and Van Dyck, antique portrait miniatures and nineteenth-century and modern British art. We also host regular exhibitions, with loans from national and international institutions. Philip Mould OBE has specialised in British art for thirty years and is regarded as the foremost expert in British portraiture. He works closely with private collectors and institutions to build their art collections and is widely consulted by the media. Our specialist on portrait miniatures is Emma Rutherford, who was previously head of the miniature department at Bonhams, and before that worked at the V&A. She is one of the most widely respected portrait miniature specialists, and has published extensively on the subject.

Lamberty
Distance: 2.3 mi Tourist Information
46 Pimlico Road
London, United Kingdom SW1W 8

020 7823 4433

Lamberty was started by Andrew in 1997. We have been based in our 2500 Square feet shop in Belgravia, 5 minutes from Sloane Square, for 10 years. "We buy and sell internationally, with a clientele ranging from royalty to rock stars, and we love our entrepreneurs too! Our only criteria for our clients and visitors is that you share our enthusiasm." I like to think we have the most exciting and stimulating furniture shop in the world. Visit us and you’ll enter a James Bond world. You’re on an exotic island when you come here. Enjoy yourselves – you’re on holiday!" Andrew Lamberty

Museum/Art Gallery Near The Sherlock Holmes Museum

Cube Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
16 Crawford Street
London, United Kingdom W1H 1BS

+44 (0) 207 9352600

Established in Bristol in 2002, Cube Gallery quickly established itself as one of the UK's finest art galleries showcasing both renowned and new artist talent. Opening a second gallery in London in 2011, both galleries show a wide range of works and exclusive events always attract a buzz amongst the viewers. We exhibit both nationally and internationally at art fairs, frequently visiting both America and Europe. If you have any queries about any of the art pieces featured on this page please don't hesitate to email us at the gallery at [email protected]

Atlas Gallery
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
49 Dorset Street
London, United Kingdom W1U 7NF

+44 (0) 20 7224 4192

ATLAS Gallery was founded in 1994 by Director and Owner Ben Burdett. Originally located in the Hoxton neighbourhood of London during the late 1990’s, the gallery became a well-known exhibition space in the heart of London’s new and vibrant contemporary art scene. In 2001 ATLAS moved to its present location in the centre of London and has, over the last decade, become one of the foremost galleries in London dealing exclusively in fine art photography. ATLAS Gallery hosts approximately six exhibitions per year. The gallery specialises primarily in classic and modern 20th Century vintage photography, photojournalism and fashion photography, in addition to representing work by a number of important contemporary photographers. In 2005 ATLAS became the official gallery agent of Magnum Photos in the United Kingdom. In June 2012 ATLAS Gallery will launch ATLAS Contemporary, introducing an exclusive group of extraordinary young to mid-career contemporary artists to the London art scene. The gallery is both active in encouraging work by young artists and photographers and assisting collectors to come into closer contact with these works. The gallery works closely with private clients and corporate collections to assemble important and unique art collections, as well as being actively involved in the acquisition of exceptional modern and contemporary works by many museums and public collections worldwide. ATLAS has a small amount of material represented on our website to view: www.atlasgallery.com There is no admission fee to ATLAS Gallery. We look forward to welcoming you to the gallery. Staff: Ben Burdett: Owner / Director Kathlene Fox-Davies: Gallery Manager Fiona Osborne Will Elliot Laura Norman

Star Art
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
Oil Drum Mansions
London, United Kingdom W12

St Pancras Editions
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
223-231 Old Marylebone Road
London, United Kingdom NW1 5QT

+44(0)2075352255

St Pancras Editions works directly with contemporary masters and up-and-coming artists to create and publish exclusive sculptural editions and signed, hand-printed, limited edition silkscreen prints. These will be available to collectors and guests through www.stpancraseditions.com and through the St Pancras Renaissance Hotel— a masterpiece in itself.

Lisson Gallery
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
27 Bell St
London, United Kingdom NW1 5

+44 (0)20 7724 2739

The Wallace Collection
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Manchester Square
London, United Kingdom W1U 3

020 7563 9500

Narrative Projects
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
110 New Cavendish Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 6XR

+ 44 (0) 20 7637 9715

The gallery’s primary objective is to open up a creative dialogue highlighting the wider cultural milieux within which our selected artists are working, and setting up provocative and enlightening juxtapositions and engagements between these and the London contemporary art scene through exhibitions and special off-site projects.

Richard Saltoun Gallery
Distance: 0.7 mi Tourist Information
111 Great Titchfield Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 6RY

02076371225

Based in London (Fitzrovia), Richard Saltoun Gallery specialises in post-war and contemporary art. The gallery has a special interest in conceptual, feminist and performance artists that emerged during the 1970s and seeks to re-establish and promote artists working in that period. Since its foundation in 2008, Richard Saltoun has organised both solo and group exhibitions and has participated in art fairs in the U.K. and internationally. In conjunction with Ridinghouse, Richard Saltoun has also published a number of monographs on British artists. Richard Saltoun represents the estate of artists Helen Chadwick, Ed Herring, Bob Law, Tony Morgan and Jo Spence.

Rose Issa Projects
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
82 Great Portland St
London, United Kingdom W1W 7NW

0207 243 3250

Rose Issa is a curator, writer and producer who has championed visual art and film from the Middle East for more than 30 years. She has lived in London since the 1980s showcasing upcoming and established artists, producing exhibitions with public and private institutions worldwide, and running a publishing programme. Through curating numerous exhibitions and film festivals, she introduced Western audiences to many artists who have since become stars of the international scene, including: Chant Avedissian, Ayman Baalbaki, Shadi Ghadirian, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Bahman Ghobadi, Hassan Hajjaj, Farhad Moshiri, Abbas Kiarostami, Rashid Koraichi and Nja Mahdaoui among many more. As well as holding exhibitions at her own project space in London, Rose Issa collaborates as a co-curator with private and public institutions such as the Beirut Exhibition Center (2010-11); the Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool (2010); Tate Britain, London (2008); the European Parliament, Brussels (2008); the State Museum of Oriental Art, Moscow (2007); the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (2007); ING Bank, Geneva (2007); the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2006); the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin (2004); The CCCB (Contemporary Cultural Centre), Barcelona (2003); the IFA - Institut fur Auslandsbezeihungen (2002-3), Stuttgart; the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam (1996-1997); the Barbican Art Centre, London (2001, 1995); and Leighton House Museum, London (ongoing, since 1992). She also advises and lends works to public and private institutions, including the CAB Art Centre, Brussels (2013); the Boghossian Foundation, Brussels (2012); the Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia (2009); Paul Klee Museum, Bern (2009); Belvedere Museum, Vienna (2009); The British Museum; the Imperial War Museum; The Museum of Mankind; the Victoria & Albert Museum; The Written Art Foundation, Wiesbaden; The National Museums of Scotland; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Smithsonian Institution (Sackler/Freer Gallery and National Museum of African Arts); the World Bank, Washington DC; and The National Gallery of Jordan. Rose Issa was a Jury member for the National Pavillions at the 50th Venice Biennale (2003) and sat on the Jury for the Arab British Centre (2013) and MOPCAP (the Magic of Persia, 2013). Publications Founder of the publishing unit Rose Issa Projects and Beyond Art Production, Rose publishes monographs and comprehensive catalogues addressing the current concerns and trends of the visual arts scene from the Arab world, Iran and Turkey. Recent titles include: Maliheh Afnan: Familiar Faces (2013); Nermine Hammam: Cairo Year One (2012); Raeda Saadeh: Reframing Palestine (2012), Farhad Ahrarnia: Canary in a Coal Mine (2011), Ayman Baalbaki: Beirut Again and Again (2011), Selma Gurbuz: Shadow of My Self (2011), Omid Salehi: a Photographer’s Journey Through Iran (2011), Fathi Hassan (2010); Parastou Forouhar: Art, Life and Death in Iran (2010) and Maliheh Afnan: Traces, Faces, Places (2009). Rose has also co-published the two major overviews on contemporary photography from the Middle East: Arab Photography Now (with Kehrer Verlag, 2011) and Iranian Photography Now (with Hatjie Kantz, 2008). Film from the Arab World and Iran In 1982 Rose Issa launched the first-ever Arab Film Festival in Paris and worked with the Delegations Etrangères at the Cannes Film Festival (1983-1985). For a further 26 years until 2008, she curated Arab and Iranian film seasons in Britain and abroad. She was special advisor to The Berlinale (2003-2007); the International Rotterdam Film Festival (1996-2002); the London International Film Festival (1987-2003); and The British Film Institute (1988-1995). She also curated Arab and Iranian film seasons at The National Film Theatre (“Hollywood on the Nile”, 2003; “Art and Life: The New Iranian Cinema”, 1999; “First Arab Film Festival”, 1987); the Barbican (“Unveiled Lives: Women and Iranian Cinema”, 2001; “Melodramas, Comedies, and Mysteries: North African Film”, 1995). In addition she curated a season of Iranian films for Britain’s Channel 4 (2005) and collaborated with them on “Cinema Iran”, a series of documentaries on Iranian cinema. She also realised the documentary, “Moving Pictures: Tunisian Women Film Directors”, for BBC2 TV (1995).

National Print Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
56 Maple Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 6HW

+44(0)207 323 1109

The National Print Gallery is located in the modest drawing room of a house in Fitzrovia. It is a concept, not a marble edifice. In April, 1997 art dealer and organiser of The Contemporary Print Show, Clive Jennings, realised that very few original artists prints could be seen in the national or provincial art institutions, and organised a Symposium entitled “Towards a National Print Gallery” at the Barbican Arts Centre. Sadly, fourteen years on, the situation has not changed enormously, and prints are still largely marginalised and misunderstood by the art establishment, Great artists have always considered prints an important part of their oeuvre. From Durer to Goya to Picasso to the Chapman Brothers, but it is still very rare to see prints on display in the Tate or The National Gallery. The National Print Gallery deals on the secondary market in contemporary prints and also publishes new editions. It has all the facilities that a visitor might expect in a major public space, but in a vastly reduced size. These include an Exhibition Space, Permanent Collection, Project Space, Library, Archive, Friends Room (the sofa), Internet Centre (the macbook) and of course a Cafe, Cloakroom, Gift Shop, Information Desk, and an Audio Guide (a vintage walkman). The National Print Gallery is a moveable feast and has organised exhibitions at several London Venues. The National Print Gallery is proud to be associated with the forthcoming exhibition by Darren Coffield, Masters of Reality, at: Pertwee Anderson & Gold, 15 Bateman Street, London W1D 3AQ. April 12 - 30, 2013. Open Mon - Fri: 11-6; Sat: 12-5 In their exploration of the themes of celebrity, identity, the function of representation and how we perceive each other, these works subvert the viewer's instinctive faculties for reading human features to create some of the most stimulating and provocative portraits of recent years. Initially the eyes and the brain struggle to interpret the information that is presented in reconfigured format, prompting a personal reassessment of one of the most basic and instinctive human reflexes: the ability to read another human face. Coffield explains: "There is now an excessive exposure to faces in the media. We see in the media faces that have been idealised, manipulated and touched up. When viewed, the face creates in the mind a kind of Orwellian doublethink. We know that we are viewing a manipulated 'untruth' and yet we hold the image to be true, a notion of beauty to obtain or aspire to. The face has a strong social, cultural and historical role. An inverted face is not only difficult to recognise but repositions our sensitivity to the spatial relationships between human features. Here, facial features become strange constellations of communication, whilst new facial recognition patterns emerge." These works are not a simple, formulaic inversion of the features, but a sensitive reinterpretation of the physiognomy. Like any intelligent portrait they have a dynamic aesthetic, individually tailored to reflect the personality of the subject. Even in their reordered state, the features retain the character of the sitter - muddled features, that hang down like a bizarre veil. Some are famous and iconic celebrities, who are instantly recognisable by their pose, and the viewer is lulled into a false sense of security by the shape of the head or a familiar hairstyle; others are obscure actors staring out from forgotten publicity stills. It is impossible not to become enmeshed in the process of identifying the subject. In the 175 years or so since the invention of photography, the function of the painted portrait has evolved from its purpose as accurate documentary representation to a more fluid, interpretive role. Technology has progressed but it is facial recognition, the way in which our features are arranged, that still forms the basis of digital and security systems. We intuitively identify faces from birth, expressing ourselves and monitoring others by the slightest change of expression. We interpret any two random circles with a line underneath as a face, the ubiquitous "smiley" for example. It is these primeval conventions that Coffield questions and reinterprets to great effect. Critic David Sylvester, known for his championing of his close friends Alberto Giacometti, Francis Bacon and Lucien Freud, and described in his Guardian obituary as "one of the finest writers on art in the second half of the twentieth century," described Coffield as "Another of those magicians who (probably without knowing) know how to imbue pieces of matter with light". In the early nineties Coffield worked closely with Joshua Compston on the formation of Factual Nonsense, a gallery in Shoreditch that became the centre of the emerging Young British Artists scene. The list of participants reads like a Who's Who of young British art, including: Matt Collishaw, Tracey Emin, Angus Fairhurst, Gilbert & George, Damien Hirst, Gary Hume, Sarah Lucas, Gavin Turk, Jessica Voorsanger, Gillian Wearing, Sue Webster and Tim Noble. A new book by Coffield about this exciting period in British Art, "Factual Nonsense: The Art and Death of Joshua Compston" is to published in the UK in 2012. Darren Coffield was born in London in 1969 and studied at Goldsmiths College, Camberwell School of Art and the Slade School of Art in London. He has exhibited widely in the company of many leading artists including Damien Hirst, Howard Hodgkin, Patrick Caulfield and Gilbert and George at venues ranging from the Courtauld Institute, Somerset House to Voloshin Museum, Crimea. Coffield was the only artist to be shortlisted for these three major UK Art competitions in 2010: The John Moores Contemporary Painting Prize; The BP Portrait Award at The National Portrait Gallery and The Threadneedle Prize. His work can be found in collections around the world. Coffield lives and works in London. "The Stately Aquariums of England" 1 - 13 December, 2011 The National Print Gallery is proud to present The Stately Aquariums o f England by David Ferry. This is a stunning new suite of prints that explore an imagined collision of two very different worlds: the commercial efforts of the asset rich, cash poor aristocrats of the 1960’s who grudgingly opened the doors of their ancestral homes to the great British public; and the desire by aquarists to furnish their fish tanks with increasingly bizarre and inappropriate aquarium ornaments from the human world that bear no relation to the natural domain of fish. In Ferry’s luscious images, bemused fish navigate a strange under water kingdom where state rooms adorned with fine tapestries and paintings are furnished with submerged London buses, and pirate galleons are becalmed in the drives of turreted stately homes. Fish fanciers consider their hobby to be a creative pursuit, the piscine tenants of their fantastic environments bec oming moving elements in a work of art. Ferry has celebrated this conceit and gently acknowledged both the kitsch world of “aquarium ornaments” and the upwardly mobile aspirations of the creators of these miniature environments, a fantasy world in a tank bubbling away on the sideboard. The scale of the images also suggest an alternative interpretation: a sci-fi future in which England is submerged, and giant mutant fancy fish swim freely through the deserted rooms of our great houses. His medium of montage is both a physical and an intellectual pursuit: the interventions he makes in the images, and the juxtaposition of unlikely and disparate aspects of our culture to deconstruct the notion of British national identity and heritage. Ferry’s Book Arts and Printmaking create a very individual footprint in contemporary art, and bear witness to th e influences of John Heartfield and the classic photomontage tradition. The creative process starts with his defilement of existing books (over 20 in as many years), usually tourist guides from the innocent post war years of the 1950’s and 1960’s, which he deftly subverts using highly selected donor material. In this case, the re-titled “English Aquariums in Country Houses in Colour” whose 28 colour plates Ferry defiled with piscine interlopers. (This unique book was purchased by The National Art Library housed in the Victoria & Albert Museum, for their permanent collection, earlier this year.) Ferry explains, “The search for donor material is part of the process of creative recycling, adding a new ingredient, a cycle of change and appropriation”. These ideas are then completely rebuilt, reworked and re-interpreted to inform a capsule collection of original prints that convey the spirit of the unique book. Ferry has exhibited extensively in the UK and throughout the world, including solo exhibitions in Berlin, New York, Poznan and Seoul. His work can be found in public and corporate collections including Museum of Modern Art, New York; Ashmolean, Oxford; Art Institute of Chicago; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, National Museum of Wales, Cardiff and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London. He is a past recipient of a Pollock / Krasner major award, and a new seat as Professor of Printmaking and Book Arts was created for him at the Cardiff Metropolitan University earlier this year.

Modern Art
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row
London, United Kingdom EC1V 3QJ

+44 207 2997950

Gallery Elena Shchukina
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
10 Lees Place
London, United Kingdom W1K 6LL

020 7499 6019

From its base in Mayfair, Gallery Elena Shchukina brings emerging contemporary artists to London. London's art scene is the most vibrant in the world. Gallery Elena Shchukina is one of the most exciting contemporary art spaces in the city. Dedicated to international contemporary artists, most of whom have never before been exhibited in the UK, this superbly curated gallery has become a must-see location for international artists and their clients. The gallery recognises no international or artistic borders. We believe in choosing international contemporary artists, painters and sculptors, who display exceptional talent, technical skill and creativity, and in exhibiting them with empathy, comprehension and judgement. Through our carefully thought out programme, we deliver confident, engaging modern art exhibitions which are accessible to everyone. A lecture programme accompanies each exhibition - it is an opportunity not only to find out about the artist but also about the particular vision underlying the gallery itself. Elena's vision combines a love of the technique of creation coupled with a passionate interest in colour. These two aspects inform our exhibitions: our artists tend to have mastered a unique skill or have a particular talent that has not been shown before in the UK. Their use of colour is complex and emotionally engaging; the combination of skill and colour produces a synthesis that is essentially Elena Shchukina. Explore our most recent addition - the online shop! http://galleryelenashchukina.com/store/artists/

Hanmi Gallery
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
30 Maple Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 6HA

London : + 44 (0)208 286 4426

Hanmi Gallery is a uniquely positioned platform for the dialogue between Asia and Europe, constantly evolving in the global arena of contemporary art. Since Hanmi Gallery in London first opened its doors in 2010, it has established itself as a major exhibiting space for predominantly Asian artists. In contrast, the Gallery’s Seoul premise dedicates itself to exhibiting an exclusive selection of works by British and European artists. Hanmi Gallery is devoted to link Eastern and Western artistic practices and exhibiting modern and contemporary art to an international audience. Working with both emerging and established artists and curators, Hanmi Gallery has a particular commitment to new media and interdisciplinary works, showcasing and fostering visual culture that reflects contemporary art trends. INTERIM EXHIBITIONS Due to upcoming major renovations on Hanmi Gallery’s London premises, the site has been running a successful programme of Interim Exhibitions. All the shows respond to the sites raw, stripped-back state with often site- specific installation works. This gallery setting offers artists and curators an opportunity to engage with a unique space. Hanmi Gallery provides a conceptual and physical laboratory for artistic trials and experimentations in a central London location. The space has become a hub for creative thinking, inspiring artists and spectators to see the space, and the art within it, in a new way. It allows them to explore how the site resonates with an artistic endeavour, and the effects that it has both spatially and psychologically. Since the gallery’s inception, the building has hosted a variety of important exhibitions. Highlights from the programme include the Interim Exhibition ‘Situated Senses 01: Inclined Angles’ curated by Jay Jungin Hwang. The project unfolded with two distinct solo exhibitions of contemporary Korean artists, Shan Hur and Soon-Hak Kwon. Each artist showed the coexistence and collision of contradictory states in the spaces of daily life, and the interrelationship between a sense of distance and space originating from the psychology of visual experience. The works outgrowth was generated from a penetrating observation about the space during the preparation for exhibition. Other notable Interim Exhibitions include works by the artists Leonard Johannson, Shezad Dawood and Yingmei Duan. The gallery will celebrate its 40th Interim Exhibition in November 2014. The inaugural exhibition of Seoul’s premise will be ‘Patrick Hughes: Reading Paradox’ (27 September- 20 December 2014), and will be focused on the artist’s Reverspective technique. Twitter: HanmiGallery Pinterest: hanmigallery Instagram: hanmigallery

FOLD Gallery London
Distance: 0.8 mi Tourist Information
158 New Cavendish Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 6YW

(0) 20 7436 8050

Vigo Gallery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
21 Dering Street
London, United Kingdom w1S1AL

+ 44 (0) 2074933492

Vigo represents emerging and established international artists, conceiving and curating shows in both public and commercial arenas. We enjoy good relations with many Museums, Residencies and Foundations from the TATE to the British Museum and advise the Levett Collection / MACM.

Ronchini Gallery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
22 Dering Street
London, United Kingdom W1S 1AN

020 7629 9188

Ronchini Gallery is a contemporary art gallery founded by Lorenzo Ronchini in 1992, in Umbria, Italy, which expanded in February 2012 with a space in Mayfair, London. Its exhibitions have explored pioneering movements within Italy; the gallery aesthetic is defined by Minimalism, Spatialism, Conceptualism and Arte Povera and it retains an unblinking future-focus on progressive movements. Ronchini Gallery evolved from 20 years of private collecting. Paterfamilias Adriano Ronchini was an early supporter of artists such as Alighiero Boetti, Daniel Buren, Joseph Kosuth, and Michelangelo Pistoletto and collected their work throughout the seventies. Subscribing to the highest standards of curatorship and scholarship, the gallery provides a rigorous context in which its artists can be viewed. Ronchini Gallery also maintains a successful publishing arm which produces exhibition catalogues, monographs, critical texts and artist’s books.

Contini Art Uk
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
105 New Bond Street
London, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 2074955101

Josh Lilley Gallery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
44-46 Riding House Street
London, United Kingdom W1W 7

020 7580 5677

Cecilia Colman Gallery
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
67 St John's Wood High Street
London, United Kingdom NW8 7

0207 722 0686

Handel & Hendrix in London
Distance: 0.9 mi Tourist Information
25 Brook Street
London, United Kingdom W1K 4HB

020 7495 1685

Separated by a wall & 200 years are the homes of two musicians who chose London & changed music. Welcome to Handel & Hendrix in London