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The Barry Wise Wise Tour of Soho, London | Tourist Information


Soho Square
London, United Kingdom W1D 3PT

07734800812

Ginglik Productions presents THE BARRY WISE WISE TOUR OF SOHO, a unique new comedy show that will leave you touched, moved and laughing like a fiend. A hysterical historical tour which merges immersive theatre, music and comedy improv on the streets of Soho. Soho resident Barry was born right in the centre of Soho and together with his long suffering apprentice Clive you will learn through laughter celebrating the rich history and present of Soho and walk in the footsteps of legends like Mozart, Hendrix, Dickens, and more. Expect facts delivered in innovative, engaging and entertaining ways, hilarious improvised banter with the public, musical theatre renditions, wild west fact offs, chases down streets and plenty of other surprises along the way. The tour culminates in one of Soho's most historic pubs where you can enjoy a drink or two and banter with Barry and Clive.

Arts and Entertainment Near The Barry Wise Wise Tour of Soho

Wetherspoons Victoria Station
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
Unit 5 (1st Floor above WHSmith) Victoria Station Concourse
London, SW1V 1JT

020 7931 0445

Heaton Park
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Heaton Park, Prestwich
Manchester, M22

The Grosvenor Hotel, 101 Buckingham Palace Road, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
101 Buckingham Palace Road
London, SW1W 0

0800 330 8011

Wicked
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
17 Wilton Road
London, SW1V 1LG

020 7492 9930

Studio 180
Distance: 1.5 mi Tourist Information
180 Lambeth Road
London, SE1 7JY

Studio 180 is a converted Georgian terrace containing five unique artists studios. The basement of the house is a multi functional space which plays host to a number of creative events. These include live music, art exhibitions, dinner club and film nights. For more information on up and coming events and hiring the space, please contact Tom at [email protected]

Channel 4
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
124 Horseferry Road
London, SW1P 2TX

020 7396 4444

Pacha Disco, London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Vauxhall Bridge Road
London, SW1V 1

The Shakespeare
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
The Shakespeare, 99 Buckingham Palace Road
London, SW1W 0RP

02078284913

The Shakespeare pub is opposite Victoria train station. Our range of drinks includes cask ale and an extensive wine list as well as a great range of soft drinks and coffees. With fabulous British food to accompany our drinks, you can relax at this Taylor Walker pub over classics such as hand battered cod, chips and mushy or garden peas, traditional British recipe bangers & mash or a roast of the day seven days a week. Our pub food is freshly prepared and includes all your British favourites. We also offer a range of sandwiches and jacket potatoes. We are delighted to welcome you at Taylor Walker and assure you of friendly service in a relaxing British pub with a welcoming atmosphere.

Pacha London
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Terminus place Victoria
London, SW1E 5NE

0207 485 4628

Konnect the capital''s latest unrivalled, multi-facetted clubbing experience in central London and is set to become the aspirational platform for London clubbers. Party until sun rise and enjoy the expertly tuned Martin Audio sound system throughout two unique rooms, in this tailor-made clubbing experience. Konnect is the place where disco, tech house and deep house from world-renowned and upcoming DJs flows long into the night.

The Qube Project
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
191 Victoria Street
London, SW1E 5NE

0203 752 0468

Victoria Palace Theatre
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Victoria St.
London, SW1E 5EA

+44 207 7492 1618

In the year 1911, the opulent Victoria Palace Theatre was designed by Frank Matcham as a music hall for Alfred Butt. Earlier, it was Butt who purchased the Royal Standard Music Hall. He demolished the Royal Standard Music Hall but retained the gold mosaic and white Sicilian marble pillars. They also retained the exterior faade, canopy and cupola and had a huge occupancy of 1550.

23 Grosvenor Gardens
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
23 Grosvenor Gardens
London, SW1W 0BP

02079765591

The Albert Pub Victoria St Nw1
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
52 Victoria Street
London, SW1H 0NP

02072225577

Abbey
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
3, Abbey Orchard St
London, SW1P 2

0207 222 5084

Make Space Studios
Distance: 1.4 mi Tourist Information
Newnham Terrace
London,

020 7928 5677

Royal Mews
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
Buckingham Palace Road
London, SW1W 0SR

020 7766 7302

A Royal Mews is a mews (i.e. combined stables, carriage house and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family. In London the Royal Mews has occupied two main sites, formerly at Charing Cross, and since the 1820s at Buckingham Palace. Many open days are held each year.Charing CrossThe first set of stables to be referred to as a mews was at Charing Cross at the western end of The Strand. The royal hawks were kept at this site from 1377 and the name derives from the fact that they were confined there at moulting (or "mew") time.The building was destroyed by fire in 1534 and rebuilt as a stables, keeping its former name when it acquired this new function. On old maps, such as the "Woodcut" map of London of the early 1560s, the Mews can be seen extending back towards the site of today's Leicester Square.This building was usually known as the King's Mews, but was also sometimes referred to as the Royal Mews, the Royal Stables, or as the Queen's Mews when there was a woman on the throne. It was rebuilt again in 1732 to the designs of William Kent, and in the early 19th century it was open to the public. It was an impressive classical building, and there was an open space in front of it which ranked among the larger ones in central London at a time when the Royal Parks were on the fringes of the city and the gardens of London's squares were open only to the residents of the surrounding houses.

Carrara At St James Theatre
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
12 Palace Street
London, SW1E 5JA

020 7592 0348

Delfina Foundation
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
29 Catherine Place
London, SW1E 6DY

0207 233 5344

Delfina Foundation is an independent, non-profit foundation dedicated to facilitating artistic exchange and developing creative practice through residencies, partnerships and public programming.

Italian Cultural Institute London
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
39 Belgrave Square
London, SW1X 8NX

020 7235 1461

102 Petty France
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
102 Petty France
London, SW1H 0BB

0203 334 3555

102 Petty France is an office block on Petty France in Westminster, London, overlooking St. James's Park, which was designed by Fitzroy Robinson & Partners, with Sir Basil Spence and completed in 1976. It was well known as the main location for the UK Home Office between 1978 and 2004 when it was known as 50 Queen Anne's Gate and now houses the Ministry of Justice and Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service. The building is 56m high, with 14 floors providing 51000m2 of office space.HistoryThe site was previously occupied by the 14-storey mansion block Queen Anne's Mansions which were despised by some architectural commentators - Lord Reigate speaking in the House of Lords in 1972 against the plans for the new building used Pevsner's description "that irredeemable horror" However, the new building's architecture was not favourably received, either, due to its scale and massing with protruding elements at the upper and lower floors, often being described as a Brutalist design: it was sometimes known to those who worked there as "the Lubyanka". Fodor's guide to London described it as "hulking", and Lord St John of Fawsley remarked that "Basil Spence's barracks in Hyde Park ruined that park; in fact, he has the distinction of having ruined two parks, because of his Home Office building, which towers above St James's Park." The building was originally built as a speculative office development but the Home Office moved to it due to lack of space in its previous headquarters in Whitehall.

Central Hall Westminster Storey's Gate London, Westminster, London
Distance: 1.1 mi Tourist Information
1 Storey's Gate, Westminster. SW1H 9NH London
London, SW1H 9NH

Maya London Escorts
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Elgin Avenue, Paddington
City of Westminster, W9 2HD

07423609027

People can find great dates when they visit the Maya London Escorts website. This is an agency focused on providing men with a host of classy women from all walks of life. These women are talented and beautiful. Visitors can look for women nearby or by specific traits.

Protocol Security International
Distance: 1.3 mi Tourist Information
Unit 22, Northumberland Park
London, N17 0YL

+447739576057,+44 7869607840

London Irish Art
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
Central Hall Westminster, Storey's Gate, Westminster, London, SW1H 9NH
London, SW1H 9

00353 1 675 0972

London Irish Art endeavours to explore the personal understanding and the experience of the Irish diaspora living in the U.K., specifically in relation to culture, identity and creativity. A dynamic programme of art, poetry and music, will inform this exciting investigation. A vast array of media will be explored, ranging from the more traditional forms of painting, photography, mixed media and sculpture to the more contemporary means of expression such as video work, installation and stop-motion animation. As London holds the largest Irish diaspora in the world, this exhibition endeavours to represent an on-going dialogue between these two countries. Striving to build ties and cultural relations with the Irish art scene in the U.K., this event is organised to provide artists with cross border exposure.

Westminster Arms Public House
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
9 Storeys Gate
London, SW1H 9

20-72228520

Piccadilly Circus London
Distance: 1.2 mi Tourist Information
1 Regent Street
London, W1D 7ET

St Stephen's Club
Distance: 1.0 mi Tourist Information
34 Queen Annes Gate
London, SW1H 9AB

020 7222 1382

St Stephen's Club was a private member's club in Westminster, London, founded in 1870.St Stephen's was originally on the corner of Bridge Street and the Embankment, in London SW1, now the location of Portcullis House. From 1962 it occupied a building at 34 Queen Anne's Gate, overlooking Birdcage Walk and St. James's Park.According to Charles Dickens, Jr., writing in 1879:HistoryTaking its name from St Stephen’s Chapel, the original meeting place of the Commons, the club was initially connected with Conservative Party Members of Parliament and civil engineers. Benjamin Disraeli, twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was among the founding fathers.The original premises were sold to the government in the early 1960s and the club moved to 34 Queen Anne's Gate, the former private house of Lord Glenconner, in 1962.The club was reopened at Queen Anne’s Gate by Harold Macmillan, then prime minister. Traditionally the Chairman of the Conservative Party was the club's president.The club closed as a proprietary membership club and was acquired in January 2003 by James Wilson and Myra Jauncey. It became officially apolitical and operated as a private members' luncheon club and venue for evening functions.

Landmark and Historical Place Near The Barry Wise Wise Tour of Soho

Gurpreet stitching
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Danson road
London, United Kingdom

07539374394

Sydenham and Forest Hill Community Yoga
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
Forest Hill Pools
London, United Kingdom SE23

St Martin-in-the-Fields
Distance: 0.5 mi Tourist Information
Trafalgar Square
London, United Kingdom WC2N 4JH

020 7766 1100

Lyric Theatre, London
Distance: 0.3 mi Tourist Information
29 Shaftesbury Avenue, , London, W1D 7ES, London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom W1D 7

20-74945045

The Lyric Theatre is a West End theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster.Designed by the architect C. J. Phipps, it was built by the producer Henry Leslie with profits from the Alfred Cellier and B. C. Stephenson hit, Dorothy (he made £100,000 from this opera), which he transferred from the Prince of Wales Theatre to open his new venue on 17 December 1888. It was the second theatre to be constructed on this stretch of Shaftesbury Avenue and is now the oldest in the street. The foyer and bars were refurbished in 1932–33, and the facade was restored in 1994. At present it seats 967 on four levels, although it originally was designed with a seating capacity of 1,306. The theatre still uses an electric pump to operate its iron curtain.Early in the theatre's history, it staged mostly comic operas, and later it has been a home to light comedies, musicals and straight dramas.The theatre retains many of its original features (including being built behind an original 1767 house front, at the rear to Great Windmill Street, the former house and museum of Sir William Hunter) and the theatre was Grade II listed by English Heritage in September 1960.

Noël Coward Theatre
Distance: 0.4 mi Tourist Information
85-87 St Martin's Lane
London, United Kingdom WC2H 7JY

020 7369 1730

The Noël Coward Theatre, formerly known as the Albery Theatre, is a West End theatre on St. Martin's Lane in the City of Westminster, London. It opened on 12 March 1903 as the New Theatre and was built by Sir Charles Wyndham behind Wyndham's Theatre which was completed in 1899. The building was designed by architect W. G. R. Sprague with an exterior in the classical style and an interior in the Rococo style.In 1973 it was renamed the Albery Theatre in tribute to Sir Bronson Albery who had presided as its manager for many years. Since September 2005, the theatre has been owned by Delfont-Mackintosh Ltd. It underwent major refurbishment in 2006, and was renamed the Noël Coward Theatre when it re-opened for the London premiere of Avenue Q on 1 June 2006. Noël Coward, one of Britain's greatest playwrights and actors, appeared in his own play, I'll Leave It To You, at the then New Theatre in 1920, the first West End production of one of his plays.The theatre seats 872 patrons on four levels. The building is now a Grade II Listed structure.Some productionsAfter opening in 1903 with a production of Rosemary starring Charles Wyndham and his wife, Mary Moore, the Noël Coward Theatre has hosted a number productions. I'll Leave it to You, in 1920, was Coward's first play. George Bernard Shaw's St. Joan with an acclaimed performance by actress Sybil Thorndike ran in 1924.

Central Saint Giles
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
1–13 St Giles High Street
London, United Kingdom WC2H 8AG

020 7240 6480

Central Saint Giles is a mixed-use development in central London. Built at a cost of £450 million and completed in May 2010, it was designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano and is his first work in the UK. The development consists of two buildings of up to 15 storeys in height, arranged around a public courtyard lined with shops and restaurants. It is chiefly notable for its façades, covered with 134,000 glazed tiles in vivid shades of green, orange, lime and yellow. It has attracted a number of high-profile tenants including NBCUniversal, MindShare and Google.Location and backgroundThe development is located in the district of St Giles, a short distance to the east of the east end of Oxford Street. The area was once notorious for being one of the worst slums in London, known as the Rookery – a maze of ramshackle houses, alleys and courtyards inhabited by thousands of destitute people. It was famously depicted by William Hogarth in his 1751 print Gin Lane. Central Saint Giles stands on the site of St Giles Court, an office development originally erected in the 1950s for the Ministry of Supply and latterly used by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). It consisted of a series of linked brick blocks of six to eight storeys high, arranged in an S-shape around two inner courtyards to which there was no public access. The grim appearance of St Giles Court contributed to the area becoming a magnet for prostitutes and the homeless. The building was owned by Legal & General but was occupied by the MOD on a lease that was not due to expire until 2011. However, at the start of the 21st century the MOD began undertaking a process of reducing its London estate and discontinued the use of several buildings in the capital, including St Giles Court. It vacated the building in April 2005.

Sanderson Hotel
Distance: 0.2 mi Tourist Information
50 Berners Street
London, United Kingdom W1T 3NG

020 7300 1400

UCL Institute of Education
Distance: 0.6 mi Tourist Information
20 Bedford Way
London, United Kingdom WC1H 0AL

+44 (0)20 7612 6000

The UCL Institute of Education is the education school of University College London . It specialises in postgraduate study and research in the field of education and is one of UCL's 11 constituent faculties. Prior to merging with UCL in 2014, it was a constituent college of the University of London. The IoE is ranked first in the world for education in the QS World University Rankings, and has been so every year since 2014.The IoE is the largest education research body in the United Kingdom, with over 700 research students in the doctoral school. It also has the largest portfolio of postgraduate programmes in education in the UK, with approximately 4,000 students taking Master's programmes, and a further 1,200 students on PGCE teacher-training courses. At any one time the IOE hosts over 100 research projects funded by Research Councils, government departments and other agencies.HistoryIn 1900, a report on the training of teachers, produced by the Higher Education Sub-Committee of the Technical Education Board of the London County Council, called for further provision for the training of teachers in London in universities. The TEB submitted a scheme to the Senate of the University of London for a new day training college which would train teachers of both sexes when most existing courses were taught in single sex colleges or departments. The principal of the proposed college was also to act as the Professor of the Theory, History and Practice of Education at the University. The new college was opened on 6 October 1902 as the London Day Training College under the administration of the LCC.